japanese

As most of contents are now written in unicode, there are some cases where two (or more) slightly different character from different language are emerged into one unicode codepoint, making them shared the same codepoint, but usually two (or more) different fonts would required to display them correctly because one glyph style are pointing to one codepoint only. So, what I'm thinking now is how can I merged them and include both glyph in one font because I am using both in same article, and there are some programs which can only load one font at one time despite have language tag support in it.

Dear typophiles,

I wonder if you can help me with this;
I'm looking for a Japanese font with Japanese characters for numbers.
So, not using our own 1-9 'characters' but Japanese characters representing them.
Does such a thing exist?

I am working on an exhibition about Samurai for an American art museum and am looking for designers that I might consult in choosing an appropriate Japanese typeface.

Japanese will only be used for select wall graphics and headings, and not for lengths of text. We have a curator on staff that is available to write, edit, and proof any text, but I am very much out of my league when it comes to understanding the design connotations of Japanese fonts. I am not so terrified of pairing Garamond with the Japanese version of Hobo (an obvious clash), as I am with pairing the Latin and Japanese equivalents of Bodoni and Tisa in a single headline.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gKsvu3
Download Japanese Fonts now: http://bit.ly/19RNg5D
View Monotype’s OEM Font Catalog: http://bit.ly/1apiFHF

Monotype has engaged with several of Japan’s top typeface foundries and distributors to enhance company’s portfolio of high-quality Japanese fonts. Typefaces from Iwata, JiyuKobo, Motoya, Ricoh and Type Project comprise the latest additions, bringing the total to more than 500 high-quality Japanese fonts that can be licensed from Monotype for a wide variety of uses.

Hello, I found this vintage poster online, and I really like the font at the bottom of the poster. I tried a couple different methods to try and see if there was a font for it, but didn't find anything. I figured maybe someone has seen the font before or maybe something similar?

The link to the actual poster is below. I am also attaching a rough tracing of the font as a jpeg in case that helps.

Thanks in advance!

http://www.enjoyart.com/library/travel_tourism/japanvintagetravelposters/large/Japan.jpg

mariyac's picture

Japanese Font on

Hey! Anyone know what font is used on http://www.avast.co.jp/index? Or any other versatile muti-weighted japanese fonts to use for web and app design? Thanks!

Hi,

I've come into a problem whilst trying to compile a font which contains some Japanese characters.
I have a basic Latin character set (MacOS Roman encoding), but with some additional unicode characters such as uni6782, uni571F – these total around 20 different characters.

The font compiles fine from Fontlab, and the characters are accessible in (All on Mac OSX 10.8) TextEdit, Adobe InDesign CS3->CS6, as well as OpenOffice. However, when I try and type these characters (via a japanese keyboard layout) or paste them in, the font reverts to a default system font which contains the characters.

Is there a certain Japanese name I need to apply for Microsoft Office (Word 14.2.0) Mac?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Terry

I have seen this font (digits and math symbols only?) in a number of places having to do with Japanese abacus and mental arithmetic practice.
If you google "flash anzan" (that is, a rather intense form of mental arithmetic practice), you will likely see this font used for the numbers.
I chose this for my sample because it contains all ten digits. The character that looks like a solidus is really the digit 1 (one). I believe that commas, decimal points, and symbols for basic arithmetic exist for this font, but as far as I know, it contains no characters beyond this.

I have this free font provided by EPSON. It's a very old font that used to be shipped with printer drivers in the 90s. I can use it in Windows without a problem. I now want to use it on my Mac (OSX 10.8) and see that the font name is garbled when I install it but the contents in the preview show up fine. I can use it in Photoshop alright but I mainly want to use it in MS Word 2011. In Word I can see the font listed (name garbled) but can't select it. I tried selecting some text and then choosing the font but it defaults to the previously selected font.

I'm an Asian font newbie utterly flummoxed with trying to find appropriate web fonts for a website.

For western European languages the site will use Helvetica Neue Light, Helvetica Neue Bold and Baskerville Italic.

But the site will also appear in Mandarin, Cantonese, Japanese and Korean, and I'm trying to find web fonts for those languages that are appropriate equivalents of Helvetica Neue and Baskerville Italic.

Googling for recommendations has just confused me further. Some people even suggest there's no sense using web fonts for Asian character sets because the file sizes would be impractically large. Others suggest that italic fonts aren't appropriate.

Can anyone help suggest what approach I should take here?

Any advice very much appreciated.

I design a magazine, each issue is about a specific city. Previous issues have included Sarajevo, Detroit, London and Athens. The next city is Kyoto. I am trying to get in touch with any type designers who live and/or work in Japan, preferably Kyoto. Do you know of anyone? Do you know of any great examples of typefaces produced in Japan (that are Latin/Roman etc not Kanji/Hiragana etc.)

I'm also currently investigating whether stacked/vertical type would be a suitable alternative to regular horizontal type. Can anyone recommend any interesting monospace/unicode faces that would make for a pleasing vertical stack?

Any help or opinions on Japanese type please get in touch! thanks. Feel free to email me here: hello@luketonge.com

Hi guys!

So I'm a graphic design student, and I'm interested in designing Japanese Typefaces. Since I don't have the budget to purchase the Asian Fontlab (and since I foresee type design as a hobby versus a profession) I've been considering purchasing TypeTool so I can do basic type editing. I noticed that it has the option of using 65,000 glyphs, so I think it would probably serve my needs.

My TypeTool question is, is it possible to make fonts in TypeTool that react to the usual input method of Japanese characters? For example, I don't want "k" to represent a single character- I want to type "ka" and have the corresponding characters か, カ, 火, 科, 家, etc etc appear. as options. I've been doing some researching, but I'm unfamiliar with the terms associated with this input method.

hello!

does anyone know if there is any source for japanese & chinese display fonts - or even webfonts - (if there are any)?

thank you
alex

WhatTheFont didn't turn up an exact match but it does look like Lorimer No.2 with a more egg-shaped lower-C and quite a different R. The differences are not subtle enough to convince me this is modified from Lorimer No.2 and I've never seen anything like it plus this is a Japanese publication so I'm guessing what else it could be. Perhaps a Japanese foundry?

http://leyline-publishing.com/arc/arc15号 Click on the book cover to see it enlarged. I'm referring to the font used in "arc/15".

Many Japanese typefaces have areas in which the stroke width reduces to literally nothing in certain areas of certain characters. I don’t have an example handy right this instant, but I can probably come up with some if no one knows what I’m talking about.

Just out of curiosity, can someone explain why this is?

Chikako Larabie

Chikako Larabie is a font design assistant at Typodermic Fonts in Nagoya, Japan. She specializes in kerning, kerning classes, Latin based language expansion and fractions. She occasionally consults on Japanese kana/kanji glyph design.

http://new.myfonts.com/person/Chikako_Larabie/

I've posted the first public version of the Tsukurimashou parametric font family on my Web site at http://ansuz.sooke.bc.ca/entry/160.

さてさてなにが、できるかな?

The main goal of this project is to support my own study of the Japanese language, so the finished product is less important than the process of getting there. However, you might still enjoy looking at it. To my knowledge, there's never been a native MetaFont family with glyph coverage for Japanese; there exist a couple that are conversions from other formats, and there was also the Quixote Oriental Fonts Project, announced more than two decades ago, apparently never usable, and now long abandoned.

I've downloaded some free Japanese fonts and want to use them in programs like Illustrator or InDesign. They come as .ttf for Windows and .suit for OS X. Neither have displayed anything but rectangles in Adobe or word processors. On both operating systems, the fonts seem properly installed but they don't work with the Japanese text I copy and paste in.

The Japanese fonts which appear to have been preloaded on my system work fine, so i know I can display Japanese but no other fonts i acquire work.

Help!

I'm currently working on a project at university, trying to create a typeface in both English and Japanese that work with each other seamlessly. What Im curious to find out is;

- Your thoughts on the idea
- Any suggestions or recomendations
- Any really good or even really bad examples of these two languages at play.

Thanks for your help.

I'm looking for a font that will be able to translate some text my sensei sent me. I'm trying to design a card for him but for the life of me can not find a decent Japanese font for it (with Kanji, found a few kana ones). I think I might need unicode ?

http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/samples/AoyagiKouzanFont2OTF__Japanese.gif
looks awesome. but doesn't seem to work on my computer. I've installed for 20 and none seem to translate well, which makes me think I need unicode version?

found it here http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_Japanese.html

I need to use this text:
山下武道こくさいきょかい

and help/direction would be amazing.

Hey Guys,
I'm wondering if anyone can identify the typeface (Japanese Sign Language)? I'm also looking for alternate suggestions for asian inspired serif fonts (I've done a typophile search and have discoved a few limited options) I really want to stay away from any "cheesy" chinese style chop socky/takeout fonts. As well, I'm looking for a nice high quality calligraphy option (I realize the example provided is likely hand drawn) Thanks for any suggestions guys!
m

Hi,

I'm working on a set of packagings in different languages and I'd need to know what difficulties I could find in terms of type, composition, if it's written from left to right or top to bottom. If there's a wiki or a site where I can read information about it please let me know. Here's the list of the languages and what I know so far:

- greek: left to right, no problems with Myriad

- indonesian: from left to right, can work it out as english, no problem

- corean: top to bottom, no problems in terms of type but wondering how to work the text direction

- hindu: not sure if it's left to right, problems with type

- thai: not sure if it's left to right, problems with type

I am looking for a good primer on Global Typography, i.e. the 'ins' and 'outs' of working with multiple translations and language/character sets (English, Chinese, Japanese, Cyrillic, etc)

could be as simple as a break down of terms: 'what's a sans serif' equivalent called in Chinese simplified? to more technical side of working with fonts across languages (addressing missing characters, accessing and using fonts etc.)

anyone have some good reference sites or pointers?

many thanks
/brad

Hi,
I'm in the process of creating a masthead for a fictional magazine, and I'm using futura extra bold – All caps.
I'm translating the title in other languages, and I want to try to make a japanese and/or korean version.
The problem is that japanese kanji/katakana/hiragana are really bound to calligraphy: is it possible, in your opinion, to create a "geometric" version of them (example: ん) and maintain legibility and recognizability?

Thank you in advance,
AM

From time to time i had to design documents that are tri lingual, or bi-lingual.
its almost always, spanish, english and another language, the last two were Chinese and Korean...

Usually i receive documents in word, with the text in chinese, and usually i don't have problems opening it. The trouble comes when i import or copy it in Indesign, because most of the times the font used by word is not the same that indesign uses for the same language.

I understand that in the mac there are some system fonts that are there to be used in this cases. For example, for the chinese document I used the MS Mincho, and after looking carefully I understood that the other two fonts (MS PGothic and MS PMincho) are like te times and helvetica versions of this font.

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