Titling

To preface, this is my first post to the forum and I've done a fair amount of digging on the issue, but haven't found any solution to my question. Apologies in advance if it has been answered somewhere else. And I must say, that the community here has been extremely invaluable so far!

I have designed Titling Alternates (labeled titling in OpenType Classes) for the Uppercase (upcs in OpenType Classes) glyphs in my font.

For this, my feature is as follows:

feature titl { sub @upcs by @titling; } titl;

I came across this a few years ago in a museum exhibiting a few pages from a 1950s edition of Picasso's bullfight drawings. Being no fan of either Picasso or bullfighting, the thing I found most interesting about this was the titling face used on the front page, particularly its U, which has its »straight« top part and its curved bottom clearly separated, and this separation empasised by serif-like hook-ish embellishments on both sides.

The guards interfered my trying to take a picture of it, but I found this blurry one online, from someone selling their edition for €6000,-.


http://ciudadmalaga.olx.es/la-tauromaquia-de-picasso-iid-436853891

Hello,
have been endlessly searching for these but to no avail, if you could help I would be greatly thankful ;-)

About Concord
Yet another typeface with simplicity as it's core element. Concord is derived from a successful type family 'Accord Alternate' by giving geometric touch to it. Hence Concord is a geometric sans serif. It has large counters which enhance readability. It is available in seven different weights for emphasis.












Available at following websites:
MyFonts.com
Fontspring.com

Greetings,
I've been developing this typeface for the past month, and I've got to a point where I'm feeling kind of blocked, so I thought it would be a good idea to come here for some help. I'm happy with the lowercase, although I'm sure you'll find lots of problems with it (problems which I'd be more than happy correcting, by the way), the main issue I'm having is with the uppercase; due to its geometric construction some letters (E,F,I,T,L,H mainly) aren't quite fitting with the curviness of the other ones.
I've made a really quick pdf with the first sentences that came to mind (feel free to ask for more material if you need it for a better judgement!), and I'd be really glad to hear the criticism of better trained eyes (and hands).

Can anyone help me find an alternative titling face to Matthew Carter's Mantinia for use on the cover of a fantasy novel?

My biggest, perhaps only, complaint with Mantinia is how heavy it appears at larger sizes—especially when it comes down to flowing nicely, not being in competition, with the imagery of a fantasy novel's cover. The current interior typeface is Minion Pro. A titling face that pairs well with Minion Pro would be a big plus. However, I do not know if that is the finalized interior face, so it is not an absolute necessity.

  • I love the ligatures, so a typeface with an assortment of ligatures is a must.
    • An alternate capital R with an extended leg is preferred

It bothers me that I couldn't work it out. The K and the R throw me the most but they're delicious to look at and the negative space within the C.

Could you guys lend a hand?

I've spent hours trying to ID this font for a future project and can't for the life of me figure it out.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

http://www.alisonowendesign.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/bexandwi...

What is the beautiful sans serif used in
the titling of this journal? Thanks )

roberlan's picture

My first font Calzone

This is a font ive been working, is inspired by the amazing "Mostra" from Mark Simonson. I wanted a font with a old feel to use on my vintage artworks and graphics, it started as a vector file that i use, but them i keep adding more characters and turned it into a real font. I would like to know the opinion of the people here about this font. Thanks.
Calzone

I love this video, directed by Keith Schofield. Justice is the French duo formerly known with their previous great typographical video, DVNO.

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