feature tag

I need advice on the most appropriate feature tag to use for discretionary substitution of word final letters by the miniscule superscript top mark forms found in the unicode ranges [0363 - 036F] and [1DD3 - 1DE6]. I am currently using 'clig' as a working feature tag and treating each minisculle superscript as a contextual ligature of a full stop plus its base glyph to be substituted whenever a space, comma, or another full stop follows.

feature clig { # contextual liguatures
# Latin
sub period' a' @class58 by uni0363;
sub period' e' @class58 by uni0364;
sub period' i' @class58 by uni0365;
sub period' o' @class58 by uni0366;
sub period' u' @class58 by uni0367;
sub period' c' @class58 by uni0368;
} clig;

Indices : Technical Info : Feature Tags : sups

'sups' is an OpenType feature tag with the friendly name "Contextual Swash". Click here to read the spec from the Microsoft Layout Tag Registry.

Discussion:
OpenType Superiors Feature: Why Do Letters and Numbers Have Different Baselines?

cswh

Indices : Technical Info : cswh

'cswh' is an OpenType feature tag with the friendly name "Contextual Swash". Click here to read the spec from the Microsoft Layout Tag Registry.

Discussion:
Contextual Swashes for Beginnings
OpenType Scripts, Swash

calt

Indices : Technical Info : Feature Tags : calt

'calt' is an OpenType feature tag with the friendly name "Contextual Alternates". Click here to read the spec from the Microsoft Layout Tag Registry.

Discussion:
OpenType Contextual Glyph Replacement
Contextual Swashes for Beginnings
Substitute the First Letter of a Word Using OpenType?

Indices : Terminology : Case

In current practice, usage of the term case most likely refers to the use of uppercase (capital) or lowercase letters. See some examples below. In letterpress practice, case refers to the physical box (case), usually wooden, that a given set of letters is stored. Capital letters were stored in the upper (top) case and lowercase letters were stored in the lower (bottom) case.

Examples:

ALL CAPS -- All letters are capitalized.

Title Case -- The first letter of each word is capitalized.

Sentence case -- where the first character is capital and the remaining words are lowercase.

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