justified

I am taking a poll among the cognoscenti here on the proper use of the term "justify" in typography.

Has it become acceptable to use such terms as "justified left," or "left justified"? Does anyone else wince at this?

I was taught many years ago that type can be set centered, justified, flush left or flush right. Those were the only choices. There was no such thing as "justified left" or "justified right." Sometimes we would add "rag right," or "ragged right" to the "flush" direction, or abbreviate "FL/RR," for example. Perhaps the "rag" language has dwindled. Specifying the rag was extra clarification. But in my mind, one should only use "justified" in one way, when both sides of a column are flush. Am I right?

I'm using Illustrator CS, though I also downloaded a trial of CS5 and this behavior is the same.

I have a brochure with columns of justified text 5" wide. I noticed that Illustrator wasn't breaking "multi-functional" on the hyphen and instead gave the previous line tons of word spacing. Testing with a new document, I can't get Illustrator to break on a hyphen, which seems baffling.

I don't want auto-hyphenation, but I tried turning it on and fiddling with its settings until it broke at the hyphen. Strangely, it then didn't justify the line ending with "multi-". Not good.

I also tried inserting a soft-return after "multi-" and again Illustrator didn't justify that line.

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