character

Two pictures of my “Girl” character. g was inspired by beautiful Natalia.


Hello Everyone,

I'm a Graphic Designer learning new skills in typography and type design. Actually I'm about to design my first typeface. I have a rough idea. But I'm stuck at making decision on the character set that I want to cover. What character set should I cover? I'm pretty confident I want to cover all (ALL) Latin scripts. Nothing non-latin for starters. And no specials such as phonetics etc. But I would like say SmallCaps etc. I'm just confused. Can someone tell me how to go about it? How to choose which character ranges I need to include?

(I have FontLab Studio 5.1.2 on Mac)

Thanks a lot for help!

I've been working with Lunatix Bold recently. It has all the accents and special characters I need.
However, when I'm writing something in Photoshop, it doesn't support certain characters, such as ¡, ¿, Ñ and the acute accented vowels (to be precise, it doesn't accept anything that is not the standard English set of characters). Then I write the text, using the same font, in Word. It's fine. I copy-paste the text into Photoshop... and it's fine!

Does anyone know why this happens? If this helps, I use FontCreator 5.6 to view the characters, and all non-standard characters are blue (the standard are green or sometimes red).

Hi!

My name is Mario and this is my first post in this great forum. Sorry for my english if I don't write correctly hehe.

I have a trouble designing my first Tamil script. Specifically with the character ஷ (Ssa). The typography I designing will be for wayfinding, and of course I want to be the most legible as possible. Searching in webs, I found three ways to draw this character, and my question is if one of them is more common, more correct, or more legible. I also could create an alternative character, but I prefer to know the best drawing for Ssa and then choose it as default.

I attach a jpg with my three versions of Ssa.

Thank you very much in advance!!!

Hi guys!

So I'm a graphic design student, and I'm interested in designing Japanese Typefaces. Since I don't have the budget to purchase the Asian Fontlab (and since I foresee type design as a hobby versus a profession) I've been considering purchasing TypeTool so I can do basic type editing. I noticed that it has the option of using 65,000 glyphs, so I think it would probably serve my needs.

My TypeTool question is, is it possible to make fonts in TypeTool that react to the usual input method of Japanese characters? For example, I don't want "k" to represent a single character- I want to type "ka" and have the corresponding characters か, カ, 火, 科, 家, etc etc appear. as options. I've been doing some researching, but I'm unfamiliar with the terms associated with this input method.

Dear Forum
this is my first post here!

I have a little question: I’m currently creating a font which contains 3 different widths for each character.
Imagine condensed, normal, extended.

Is it, and how, possible to let the typeface itself change, or say randomly pick, one of these 3 possible widths while i’m typing it in inDesign? In heard that some handwriting typefaces apply such glyph-exchange-techniques to not let the typeface appear to stiff in a larger text.

Any help or further reading is very much appreciated!
best wishes
Johannes

Hello Everybody,

Short: would you think a Sans-Serif, Futura, Bifur Type describes our time today?

Explanation:
I have a question which I would be very grateful if you could give me an answer to, a tip, your point of view. I am about to do my Bachelor this semester and I would like to do a Font Specimen 'in/with' pictures i.e involving human faces/models. It should be something like bringing fashion photography and typography together, on both booklet and poster.

I wanted to do something for the age, like portraying a feeling of today, like contemporary people.
For me - and of course for all of us I can guess - Types are more than just Fonts, forms and words put together, there is a soul, a character behind and there is only one accurate or the right one for a topic.

Greater Albion have jusst released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts:

Corsham:
Corsham was inspired by traditional stonemason's engraved lettering designs. Designed to be used alone, or in combination with our Corton family, ithas wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Four faces are offered-regular bold and black weights as well as a condensed form. All faces include a range of Opentype features, including ligatures and old-style numerals. The Corsham faces merge 'olde-worlde' charm with fun character, yet remaining clear and legible for text use.

Metropole:

I have been corresponding with Hoefler Frere about customizing the standard character set for Whitney. Whitney has a default character set and an alternate set. We want to have some of the alternate characters to replace their default characters in the main set, and are told that choosing an alternate character can only be done manually, one at a time, through the glyphs palatte in InDesign/Illustrator.

eng

Eng or engma (majuscule: Ŋ, minuscule: ŋ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, used to represent a velar nasal (as in English singing) in the written form of some languages and in the International Phonetic Alphabet.
Lowercase eng is derived from n with the addition of a hook to the right leg, somewhat like that of j. The uppercase has two variants: it can be based on the usual uppercase N, with a hook added (or "N-form"); or it can be an enlarged version of the lowercase (or "n-form"). The former is preferred in Sami languages that use it, the latter in African languages.
Early printers, lacking a specific glyph for eng, sometimes approximated it by rotating a capital G, or by substituting a Greek eta (η) for it.

Typophile Threads:

Greater Albion have just released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

The first of these, Cirflex was inspired by a 1930s shop sign, and makes an ideal typeface for Streamline Era and Art Deco design. Cirflex is offered in regular and bold weights.

Remember those 1970s science fiction dramas which had such charming 'futuristic' sets and backdrops? Remember the intriguing 'future' lettering and signage the set designers would devise-often coupled with interesting 'futuristic' spellings? Movella, Greater Albion's latest release, is something of a new departure for us and is a family of three typefaces inspired by that design ethos. The three faces- regular, italic and the 3d solid form - are all capitals faces which combine a feeling of 'retro-futuristic' design with easy legibility.

Movella can now be found on Myfonts and Fontspring. Here'a sample of it in action:

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched 'Corton' a pair of display Roman small capitals faces.

Corton was inspired by the traditional lettering on a gravestone in an English village. While that might sound a rather solemn beginning, Corton has wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Two faces are offered-regular and titular. Between them they are ideal signage and display faces, merging 'olde-worlde' charm and fun character.

Corton is currently available through Myfonts, and is offered at a 35% introductory discount.

Help! I hate the childish, inconsistent, heavy-handed scrawl that passes for my handwriting. However, I'm not much happier with the readily available learn-at-home alternatives: italic or modern cursive. They are legible, but that's about it. They reek practicality, without having elegance or sophistication or individuality.

I am looking for a font to use as a model for my handwriting. My ideal would be something modern, distinctive, legible, fairly easy to write quickly and arresting or "cool" (whatever that means when applied to handwriting). A lot to ask, I know.

I would so appreciate any suggestions. Thank you in advance for your help.

Nick

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