Cyrillic

Hi,
does anyone recognise the typeface below?
Thanks, Steffen

Tosche's picture

Greek Phi and Cyrillic Ef

Hi everyone,

I'm making Greek capital Phi Φ and Cyrillic capital Ef Ф.
While comparing several typefaces, I noticed that many of them include Phi and Ef designed separately.

Basically it seems that you can extend the stem beyond the baseline and Cap line for the sake of visual adjustment, and you can do it further with Phi (I've seen some inscriptions that have O part of Φ aligned to the baseline and Cap line).

But even with those which do not include extended Phi Φ and Ef Ф, they are still designed differently.
For example, Lucida Grande's Greek Phi is made slightly bolder and wider than Cyrillic Ef.

If you are aware of this issue, please tell me why they are treated that way (historical or practical reasons behind it), and the problem of using identical outline.

Hi there,

I'm looking for nice serif for a magazine.
It's a Magazine about Cars so the Serif should not be to sweet :)
It's published in several languages:
German
English
French
Italian
Spanish
Portuguese
+ Russian

(also in Japanese, Chinese and Korean, but this is another problem but don't hold back)

Can anyone recommend a good latin+cyrillic serif?
I liked Arnhem and Albertina but don't know if they work.

I would be very happy if anyone could help!!


Rosetta Type Foundry (Press release)
Strong focus on multi-script typography

Brno, Czech Republic (February 2011) The new independent type foundry Rosetta released its website (www.rosettatype.com) and online store on January 2011. The foundry intends to provide typefaces for new and rapidly growing markets that require special language support for particular orthographies, languages and writing systems.

Rosetta was created by David Březina and the prolific duo responsible for the successful foundry TypeTogether (www.type-together.com), Veronika Burian and José Scaglione. The three Co-Founders are graduates of the University of Reading, which has a long standing tradition of research in non-latin typography.

Rosetta is an independent foundry, created by David Březina, José Scaglione and Veronika Burian, with a strong focus on multi-script typography. It is a response to the increasing interest and need, within the global market, for multi-script typefaces that are both technically and aesthetically of the highest standard. Rosetta is committed to promoting research and knowledge in that area and to support excellence in world script type design.

Hi, all.

I'm seeking a nice/good/usable, reasonably condensed handwritten font which includes Cyrillic characters.
Having a good level of readability at smaller sizes would also be a bonus (allowing for longer strings within limited title space — hence condensed).

Examples of what I mean by 'nice/good/usable'…
Nothing too scrawly. No classic/classical scripts.

http://www.fontshop.com/fonts/singles/dalton_maag/verveine_corporate_reg...
http://www.fonts.com/findfonts/detail.htm?productid=151003
http://typekit.com/fonts/ff-market-web
http://www.fontshop.com/fonts/singles/suomi_type_foundry/suomi_hand_scri...

^^ Suomi Hand Script would be a great choice if it had Cyrillics chars.

Many thanks for any recommendations y'all can share.

Rosetta Type Foundry announced (Press release)
Strong focus on multi-script typography

Brno, Czech Republic (February 2011) The new independent type foundry Rosetta released its website (www.rosettatype.com) and online store on January 2011. The foundry intends to provide typefaces for new and rapidly growing markets that require special language support for particular orthographies, languages and writing systems.

Rosetta was created by David Březina and the prolific duo responsible for the successful foundry TypeTogether (www.type-together.com), Veronika Burian and José Scaglione. The three Co-Founders are graduates of the University of Reading, which has a long standing tradition of research in non-latin typography.

happy New Year, typophiles!
I am glad to present a new Osnova family, sans serif workhorse.

bigbird's picture

Modern serif cyrillic...

Hi all - I am working on an identity project for a client in Russia. I need to find a cyrillic font which reflects a contemporary interpretation of a heritage brand. I am thinking something along the lines of Fedra Serif, but I need a cyrillic character set. Any suggestions?

The title says it all!
I'm looking for a Jenson-esque webfont that covers both roman and cyrillic alphabets... any suggestions?

<3

ATF's picture

Georgian type design

Is anyone out there able to help me with a small Georgian-language assignment? Someone that can read Georgian (not Cyrillic)? I have to set three words in an existing custom font in Georgian language.

Thanks in advance...

Wayne

Hi,

I'm seeking some advice on kerning of Cyrillic glyph afii10093, picture attached. My question is: Since it's made up of two separate 'mini-glyphs', should it be kerned as two glyphs or one? That is, should the spaces either side equal the space in between the two sections, or be larger (so that the glyph appears more as a unfied whole)?

Could there be a special reason behind the consistent use of the Cyrillic К (Ka, Kako, U+041A) in the name of Nikola Tesla (Никола Тесла)?


St.Sava Cathedral, 25th St. and Broadway, New York City.


Hotel New Yorker, West 34th St., off 8th Ave., New York City.

I'm fascinated by the numeral 4 in this publication, but I can't identify what the typeface is. I've checked the usual suspects, but unless there's some kind of opentype alternate glyphs hiding in some variant of Trade or the like, I've no idea what it is. It's the face 14 and 58 are set in here (rather fond of the 8 too). There are more pictures of the whole thing here: http://qus-qus.com/projects/28/orekhprom

I was asked to substitute Cyrillic text into Illustrator CS4 pages that now have text in Japanese. The Cyrillic text (set in Times New Roman) is longer than would fit nicely in the given spaces. This is for a church booklet so it would be nice to have a sober Old-World serif which is also narrower than the Times and more beautiful. Any recommendations? Any free fonts out there that would suit? Spasiba.

SBLLM's picture

Cyrillic & Greek extensions

Hey guys, I just need a bit of advice/opinions really.
I've been commissioned to build a display font for a client which I've done. They are now requesting cyrillic & greek extensions for other territories to use. Now what I'm wondering is what's the norm for this, ie. do you build the extra glyphs into the same font as extra unicode characters or do separate font files for the European, Cyrillic and Greek versions?
Thanks in advance, any help is gratefully appreciated!
Si

Hi everybody!
I'm from Bulgaria.
Long time I've wanted to discuss the issue of neglected Cyrillic alphabet.

Hi everybody!
I'm from Bulgaria.
Long time I've wanted to discuss the issue of neglected Cyrillic alphabet.

It's a kind of orphan at the moment. It was developed during the Medieval time in the Bulgarian kingdom. Following very close graphical characteristic of Greek alphabet, together with Latin, the new alphabet become third one from the same family. After Bulgaria was conquered from the Ottoman empire the development of this alphabet stopped. It was like that until 18th century, when Peter The Great of Russia decided to make some reforms in it. Some letters were disregarded, others emerged, third received graphical changes.Initially good, this Reform somehow made the gap between similar Greek and Latin grow bigger.

om's picture

Locl features for Cyrillic

I try to create locl feature for Serbian and Bulgarian letters. But while working in FontLab, they don’t work both in Illustrator and InDesign (CS4). My initial feature code:

feature locl { # Localized Forms
# Latin
language MOL exclude_dflt; # Moldavian
sub Scedilla by uni0218;
sub scedilla by uni0219;
language ROM exclude_dflt; # Romanian
sub Scedilla by uni0218;
sub scedilla by uni0219;
script cyrl; # Cyrillic
language BUL exclude_dflt; # Bulgarian
sub @russ by @bulg;
language SRB exclude_dflt; # Serbian
sub afii10066 by b.serb;
} locl;

It works for Moldavian and Romanian, but doesn’t work for Bulgarian and Serbian.
Then I used lookups:

feature locl { # Localized Forms
# Latin
lookup locl1 {
sub Scedilla by uni0218;
sub scedilla by uni0219;
} locl1;

I am new at this forum, so I’m not sure whether this is the right place to post these kind of questions, but I need a typeface for everyday use with Cyrillic letters. Being a poor student, I don’t think I can afford an expensive, professional one. Does anyone have an idea or two?

What I’m looking for is to begin with, a good all-round typeface, like Garamond but for Cyrillic. The only thing I have now is Times Cyrillic, which I find rather boring. But if anyone has great tips for sans serif fonts, I’d appreciate that as well. And, as previosly stated, I’d prefer free fonts if that is possible.

Thanks in advance!

Caspian Rehbinder

andrijtype's picture

more Turbota please

my new typeface Turbota ('care' in Ukrainian), drawn for a rehabilitation center for disabled children, is now released on MyFonts. it is a monolinear semi-serif font with soft terminals, it suits well for formal and informal writing in Cyrillic and Latin scripts.

http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/andrijtype/turbota/

and here are my son's paper models in this poster

Hey!
Anybody now any decent typefaces for magazine design which comes with support for cyrillic text? I'm not too picky at this moment since I'm struggling to find anything at all...
Thanks in advance!
/Fredrik

Updated description: this is a contemporary serif family I'm working on since January 2010. It was initially just for personal use, but the project grow up to embrace complete Latin, Cyrillic and Greek scripts, besides phonetic alphabets, arrows and dingbats.

It's a text font and the family is planned to have several weights in roman and italic versions. I believe it will be released in early 2013.

Goals:

1. it must be suitable for books and magazines, with more contrast than contemporary typefaces like Meta Serif, Greta Text or Stuart.

2. it must be clean and legible, with high x-height, generous counterspaces and reduced ornamental elements.

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