signage

Bengala is a trendy new type system. The family is made up of a script style, an extended all-caps style, and an ornament set that includes the animal illustrations shown here.






Hello all,

I’m currently looking for any information about vintage hand lettering signage in the city of OPorto in Portugal. I know it’s a difficult subject to find information about, but anyone who knows something about it, please let me know. Also, any info about the history of hand lettering signs would be really helpful. Thanks to everybody!!!

Best,
Ricardo C.

Hi! I'm in search of the typeface used for signage all over Venezia, as the one showed in the picture. In the last Biennale di Architettura, designer John Morgan used it as inspiration for the biennale posters and branding typeface. It sure is much like Didot, but then is worked as stencil, like Charrette (which is mainly associated with Le Corbusier) and which is heavier and thicker than the one used in Venezia... I've done a basic search and found no information on the matter. Could you please help me out?
Thank you all!

Friend takes me for a font guru and asked if I knew which font was used in the Tampa airport. Which I didn't. Do you?

Hi guys, this has gotten me stumped and I thought I'd turn to the experts for some help. I would be happy with something that's just close and isn't exact, but that triangular capital A is something I've never seen before in a typeface like this.

The subject says it all: this is from a photo presumably taken in Manila some time before the building got damaged in a fire in 1931.

I'm hoping you could help me out! Thanks.

Having trouble identifying the typeface used on these old signs, and the dates that they were in use. I could dig up a few conflicting dates, between early 1900's and into the 40's, but haven't found anything definite. Also, they were apparently printed white on Navy, and used in several neighborhoods in New York. I checked a couple type specimen books from the 1905-1915 era and got nothing. Any help identifying this typeface would be greatly appreciated!

Hi all,

Long time no post! Sorry about that. I got married, bought a house, had a kid-- forums were the first thing to get cut. I guess I was never super active here, but nevertheless I'm glad my account is still around. I still think of this as the premiere place to talk about type.

I work at the Chicago Humanities Festival, and we just posted a video of a presentation by Chicago designer Jason Pickleman. He's created identities and branding for some great restaurants and cultural organizations here in Chicago.

His talk covers three areas:

  • A philosophical look at the role of text and type in our lives
  • A look inside his own creative process
  • (My personal favorite) A biting critique of trends in Chicago signage

Buy the letters from the old Toronto Four Seasons Hotel sign. (18 out of 44 already sold!)

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched the Doncaster family on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Doncaster is a bold display face which emphasises legibility and clarity, but which combines those qualities with a distinctive flair. The designs have a timeless quality, making them equally at home today or even in Victorian inspired design work. All of the faces are ideal for poster work, signage or for really eye-catching but not ostentatious headings and titles. Seven faces are offered combining upper and lower case forms with incised and embossed decoration as well as an italic form.

Here is a specimen sheet showing all seven faces:

This was found on old University signage at the University of Minnesota. It looked hand painted so it may not be a specific font but perhaps it was based on one.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

We are looking for a Design Development Associate (this means a designer who has management skills as well, and can contribute to business development) to work out of our partner company Merson Sign Design in Surrey, UK, and the University of Reading. The designer will working alongside the MSD team to develop their expertise in the field of multi-script airport wayfinding and sign design; there is also a brief to broaden the skills and knowledge within MSD, and to explore Middle East sales opportunities and management methods.

The post is for two years, with further potential at the end of that contract. Full details here:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/ABW333/design-development-associate/

I would appreciate general feedback on this image database I've been working on, and I would also like fellow Typophiles to get involved and contribute on any level. Cheers, RD

http://www.typarchive.com/

Similar to DIN or something, the rounded A however...?

Greater Albion have just released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

The first of these, Cirflex was inspired by a 1930s shop sign, and makes an ideal typeface for Streamline Era and Art Deco design. Cirflex is offered in regular and bold weights.

Mynaruse Royale is an expansion of Mynaruse Titling. It features script capitals and widely tracked and smaller titling capitals. Mynaruse Royale has plenty of character and, with its powerful and sharp serifs that draw the eye. Mynaruse Royale is useful in settings that call for titling with an extra touch of elegance, such as a storefront, wedding program or formal invitation.
Mynaruse Royale contains a number of OpenType alternates, including alternate forms for the capitals that are large, drop cap like capitals instead of the calligraphic script capitals found in the default forms. Additionally there are non widely tracked lowercase forms that work well with the included alternate characters and ligatures.

A friend of mine got this from a fleamarket in Normandie/France. Must be from the 50s. I’m not asking for an ID since this is obviously custom made. But maybe someone knows something about this kind of wonky style or of similar looking typefaces. Any input is appreciated.

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