19th century

Hi typophiles! I am doing a massive history paper on typography during the 19th century. There was a lot of innovation in the typographic in this period due to the new demand and ability of the industrial revolution, including the creation of the first slab serif and sans serif fonts.

Does anyone know what the primary font is (heading and body) in the attached ad, and if there is a modern digital version of it? My intuition tells me that if there were, I would see it used, because it really is beautiful. It seems to have been very common back in its day, but I'd never seen it until I recently started looking at old print ads and such.

I'd like to make sure I've researched it thoroughly before putting in the time to recreate it myself. Any help is much appreciated. I'm a new member on this forum, so hello to all.

Greetings typophiles!

Does anyone know of any sans-serif typefaces of the 19th century from England? It's rather specific, but hope many typographically-knowledged folk here would know of some.

Cheers all!

Can anyone help me out with these typefaces? It was printed around 1882
Both the type "Showprinting" "poster cuts" and "colored and pained design"

Apologies for the blurry photo...

I'm looking for a good serif for a project with a late 19th century look to it (Alternate Gothic and Clarendon bold are also involved).

I think I'd like to use something like Brunel (http://www.christianschwartz.com/brunel.shtml) or Benton Modern Display (http://www.fontbureau.com/fonts/BentonModernDisplay/).

The former seems to be in limited release and the latter could work but I'd like to know what other similar fonts are out there. I tried to search for information on "English Modern" (Which is what the designer says Brunel is) but I can't find anything.

I know the moderns like Bodoni, Century and Modern No. 20 but I don't think they're right for this.

What do you think?

Greater Albion have jusst released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts:

Corsham:
Corsham was inspired by traditional stonemason's engraved lettering designs. Designed to be used alone, or in combination with our Corton family, ithas wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Four faces are offered-regular bold and black weights as well as a condensed form. All faces include a range of Opentype features, including ligatures and old-style numerals. The Corsham faces merge 'olde-worlde' charm with fun character, yet remaining clear and legible for text use.

Metropole:

I'm looking to ID the types used in "The Amazon an Madeira Rivers" (via the Library of Congress.) Both the title page and body text please. Images are attached as well.

I was looking at Nick Shinn's Scotch Modern and it looks very close to the body.

Thanks for all your help fellow typophiles.

Andrew

Doing a motion graphics piece using 18th & 19th century engravings of mythical animals, etc... Very fanciful and over the top. Need a font for some Initial caps that resembles an embellished engravers, similar to fonts used on currency, but more fanciful. Like this, only much nicer. This, I think, is rather blunt and vulgar.

I can only explain what I'm looking for as "Baroque Victorian" which I know is no help at all.

What are your favorite fonts (or EPS resources) for something like this?

Hi all,

At the antiquarian book fare in Stockholm the past weekend, I came across this book in a shelf. The title page caught my attention because of a peculiar hyphen.

Has anyone seen this typeface before? It is scanned out of a history book about Francis Bannerman. It is a sample page from the Bannerman 1888 catalog.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched 'Corton' a pair of display Roman small capitals faces.

Corton was inspired by the traditional lettering on a gravestone in an English village. While that might sound a rather solemn beginning, Corton has wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Two faces are offered-regular and titular. Between them they are ideal signage and display faces, merging 'olde-worlde' charm and fun character.

Corton is currently available through Myfonts, and is offered at a 35% introductory discount.

Greater Albion has just released three new families on Myfonts.com.

Jonquin was inspired by some hand lettering seen on a World -War One recruiting poster. It’s a family of three faces for display work and headings designed to be used readily as an 'All-Capitals' face as well as in upper and lower case format. Regular and bold weights are offered, as well as an even more decorative incised form. The whole family is ideally suited for poster and advertising work, as well as book and record covers and period themed signage.

Maybe I'm just using the wrong keywords, but I'm finding this surprisingly hard to find on Google. I'm hoping the Typophile think-tank can help point me in the right direction. :-)

We're rebranding a company that was founded in the early 19th century (yes, they're *that* old) in the United States, and we're trying to find authentic typefaces from the era, or modern reinterpretations that offer a comparable effect.

I don't know what the early 19th-century designers used, whether they were American typefaces or imported, but whatever was relatively common at the time for promotional materials, we're hoping to emulate as closely as reasonably possible.

Syndicate content Syndicate content