Display

Does anyone know which typeface is this on the cover of this magazine? (where it reads "Choice") And also the others? Glosa, Acta?
http://cache.krop.com/marianaochs-4b06b82115afd8.jpg

And also on this magazine:
http://cache.krop.com/marianaochs-4a4bbdd8b3226.jpg

Thank you!

One of TypeTogether's latest releases, the Abril type family, keeps growing. We added two new fonts to the display part of this successful typeface. Abril Display Black and Abril Display Black Italic grant yet a bolder and more contrasted option that is suitable for the biggest headlines and signs.

Learn more about Abril typeface at: http://www.type-together.com/Abril

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Anyone know what this one might be? Or is it a mix of caps?

Hello,
This is my debut typeface (which is still untitled).
What initially meant to be modular serif inspired by arab calligraphy, turned out into somewhat modernist base with elements used by older serif typeface styles.


Some glyphs still need work - namely N, Q, X, f, x, 4, 8.
Also I haven't started to work on kerning yet.
And FL technical features are like a plane cockpit to me.


These analogues are the closest of what I managed to find:
Sahara Bodoni
Poster
Austin Fat
Nouvelle Vague

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched the Doncaster family on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Doncaster is a bold display face which emphasises legibility and clarity, but which combines those qualities with a distinctive flair. The designs have a timeless quality, making them equally at home today or even in Victorian inspired design work. All of the faces are ideal for poster work, signage or for really eye-catching but not ostentatious headings and titles. Seven faces are offered combining upper and lower case forms with incised and embossed decoration as well as an italic form.

Here is a specimen sheet showing all seven faces:

Can anyone identify this font from a Brazilian sports mag? That X looks familiar.

When merely "extended" just would not do, here is Paragraph Stretch™: a super extended or elongated geometric display typeface. It is a modular unicase typeface: the capitals and lower case fit the same height and width, so they are interchangeable: fancy a round "W" in all caps? Use the lower case. Want a straight "x" in lower case? Use the cap. And so on. Designed for use at larger sizes for logotypes, short titles or headings. It supports Western plus Nordic, Eastern European and Turkish languages.

Available from MyFonts.

Greater Albion have jusst released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts:

Corsham:
Corsham was inspired by traditional stonemason's engraved lettering designs. Designed to be used alone, or in combination with our Corton family, ithas wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Four faces are offered-regular bold and black weights as well as a condensed form. All faces include a range of Opentype features, including ligatures and old-style numerals. The Corsham faces merge 'olde-worlde' charm with fun character, yet remaining clear and legible for text use.

Metropole:

Hi all, designing a logo from a drawing I made,
I need to make the type more legible for the client,
any advice is welcome! The company name is liquid violet.
They are a young

The below was sent to the client as explanation:

'The logo here is typographic. A bespoke
typeface has been created for Liquid Violet
which draws on liquid forms taken from the
name. This logo represents a more modern
approach. Please note the typeface can be
made more legible if desired and the word
‘liquid violet’ can be placed within the
logo-mark.'

Liquid seems to be more legible than violet right now?

Thanks all.

rosaiani's picture

Exotique

Hello!
I'd like to share and get feedback on a set of capitals I have designed for a client work, maybe it will see the light of day as a font. I'm calling it Exotique, and it's a Modern Display Serif. It is made to be seen at big display sizes.

Cheers and thanks!
Rodrigo

Need help to ID the font at the bottom of the logo (sort of a tag line). If the main name is a font, I'd love to know that, too (I don't think it is but I could be wrong).
Currently in use as a logo for a local Burger Bar.

Thanks in advance!

BTW, received a server error on the first attempt. If this double posts - my bad, sorry!

Hi can anyone help me identify this title font from the Horniman Museums (South East London) display cases?

Leibix, inspired by a jolly trademark of the past, is a fun family of five typefaces which transcends different eras of the past. It has elements of the 1920s in its design, but is equally at home with projects having a 1970s theme of an up to the minute modern one. Leibix is intended for eye catching cartoon captions, in posters of anywhere else a casual impact is required.

Greater Albion is offering Leibix at an introductory 40% discount on Myfonts.

Albia Nova is a bit of a new departure for Greater Albion-an unashamedly futuristic typeface. It was originally developed for a friend of ours-a set designed who needed some lettering on props for a science fiction play-the brief was to evolve conventional letter forms and speculate as to what they may look like in the future. As released Albia Nova is a more refined version of this idea, placing a bit more emphasis on readability (today) over evolution of the letterforms. The result is good for giving design projects a futuristic feel, but also has something of the 1970s and 1980s about it.

AlbiaNova has released on Myfonts at a 40% introductory discount.

Anyone know the name of the font in blue? I can't find it to save my life...

You may recognize this as being the First Edition of Moby Dick printed in New York 1851. I am hoping to source typefaces that are from the period that have a very close DNA.

Monotype Modern seems like a logical relative but I cannot find anything condensed/compressed enough.

Your help on this is greatly appreciated.

i-o

P.S. Please omit the conjunction "OR," from your type identification.

P.P.S. My apologies if I am not using the word "Transitional" properly.

Good afternoon.

I could use some help identifying this handwriting font for a logo I need to rebuild...

Thanks in advance!

You are looking for a contemporary upright script family?
Lignette Script is an elegant monoline font consisting of 535 glyps, with a wide range of languages covered (including greek) and 71 beautiful ligatures – please make sure to use applications that support OpenType features. Moreover Marcus Sterz created Lignette Deco to complete the graceful look with frames and ornaments.

Right now it is on special sale on MyFonts
http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/facetype/lignette/

Or visit our own website
http://www.facetype.org/family/lignette

I am in the early stages of developing a chromatic face that, by design, employs a lot of slight diagonals (1 to 5 degrees off the horizontal or vertical). The glyphs are made to look as if they were formed by folding strips of paper (I know, I know it's been done before). In addition to the pair of companion chromatic fonts within the family (each representing a different side of the strip of paper), I want to make a monotone version that somehow achieves the 2-sided effect without the use of multiple colors.

The solution I've arrived at to simulate that 2-sided effect is to, in the areas representing the back of the strip of paper, block or mask out strokes that run parallel with the strip. The problem I've encountered in testing the viability of this solution is that the edges of the strokes (set at the aforementioned slight diagonal angles), as well as the edges of some of the solid sections, appear quite "jaggy" when I test the PS OpenType font in Illustrator or InDesign.

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