edwardian

AlexGMac's picture

An Edwardian era font

I'm looking for a font from (or derived from) the Edwardian era - (Not the font, 'Edwardian' or Edwardian Script)
It must be...
Legible on HD res screen for relatively quick reading
Hint at Elegance and Romance without being overtly so
It could be either...
A font from that era
or...
A contemporary interpretation derived from signage or calligraphy of the era.
Any advice would be gratefully received,
Thanks
Alex

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Having trouble finding any information on this poster type, printed in 1912 advertising Titanic. I would much appreciate some help identifying it and even gathering any other examples of it in use.

Thanks,
C

http://i51.tinypic.com/fva2w0.jpg

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

Greater Albion has just released three new families on Myfonts.com.

Jonquin was inspired by some hand lettering seen on a World -War One recruiting poster. It’s a family of three faces for display work and headings designed to be used readily as an 'All-Capitals' face as well as in upper and lower case format. Regular and bold weights are offered, as well as an even more decorative incised form. The whole family is ideally suited for poster and advertising work, as well as book and record covers and period themed signage.

Upstairs Downstairs was a well regarded UK show of the 70s.... about an Edwardian family and their servants.

The titles were in a gourgeous 'period' lettering style.

Anyone know what it is?

Howlett, which is now released on Myfonts.com, combines great character with extreme legibility.

It’s a simple display face that offers a sense of coziness and order, that speaks of all being well with the world. It is a modern design which pays due Acknowledgment to the past.

An extensive range of Opentype features, including old-style numerals, terminal forms, ligatures and stylistic alternatives are included.

Use it for headings and titles as well as eye catching poster work.

You can try out Howlett on Myfonts.com or see some examples of it in action in our blog.

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