Oblique

Our largest type family just got bigger! Originally designed by Veronika Burian and José Scaglione as a titling typeface, Tablet Gothic is quickly becoming a news designer's favourite. The font delivers the sturdy, straightforward and clean appearance expected from a grotesque combined with a good measure of personality. Now with the obliques making it a total of 84 fonts with six grades of condensation, Tablet Gothic can deliver consistent impact even better, whatever the publication format.

Vintage / antique seltzer bottle from Argentina.

Looking to identify the type - or find a close match

I'd like to ask you for help with identifying the typeface that's used in the Serpent logo on the company's website http://www.serpent.com. In case it somehow doesn't work here's a picture:

Cursive

Indices : Terminology : Cursive

Being Cursive is a property of typography and Calligraphy which implies a certain inclination or angular tilt, either positive or negative, relative to the orthogonal "y" axis.

In type, both Oblique and Italic are Cursive in the sense that they imply some sort of inclination, somehow reminiscent of written language. Other examples of Cursive may include some Script types.

Oblique

Indices : Terminology : Oblique or Sloped Roman

Oblique or Sloped Roman letterforms are sometimes incorrectly called italic. Like italics, obliques are used to offset, or give emphasis to, certain parts of a text otherwise set in upright roman type.

Oblique styles may also be called slanted roman since they are the same letterforms found in the roman face but have been slanted. In some instances they are mechanically slanted (where a slant is created by the font software) or hand-drawn slanted by the designer.

Italic letterforms (sometimes called "true italics" to further distinguish from obliques) have been drawn so that they are more formally differentiated from upright roman letters.

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