german

I'm making a big multilingual sans serif and by default, the "a" and the "g" are double storey. I do include the single story versions available by "salt" because this feature works virtually everywhere, where there is Opentype).

However, I've heard that the Germans mostly use the single story g. I've searched pictures of various street signs in Germany and Austria and I haven't found any double story g's.

Would it be ok to include 'locl' feature for German language to substitute only the g (while leaving the "a" double story)? I do understand that the single story g has its roots in Fraktur. And is it a German-only preference or the neighbour languages like Dutch, Danish, Swedish, etc. look more natural with a single storey g?

Pendula™ is an adaptation of Pittorseques Droites (Scenic Casual) found in the circa 1924 specimen book of La Fonderie Typographique Francaise. Changes to a very small number of the original characters were made to make the typeface work better with more languages, as well as for aesthetic reasons. A newly designed Cyrillic character set was added to make the design even more useful, enlarging the character set from the basic Latin set to over 650 glyphs covering seven languages. Pendula™ also includes tabular and proportional number sets plus a bonus set of over thirty monetary symbols. Other international symbols were included too. It is a wonderfully casual and flexible design, usable in many situations.


Alphabet Soup Type Founders and Michael Doret are proud to announce the Release of Dark Angel, a “blackletter/hybrid” font. This font had its genesis in a logo sketch for the Anaheim Angels baseball team—thus its name.
Type purists may be appalled by the lack of adherence to traditional forms, but the font should be seen as only “in the spirit of” blackletter, and attempting something that hasn’t been seen or done before—something that feels traditional, yet at the same time fresh and perhaps unexpected.


Alphabet Soup Type Founders and Michael Doret are proud to announce the Release of Dark Angel, a “blackletter/hybrid” font. This font had its genesis in a logo sketch for the Anaheim Angels baseball team—thus its name.

Type purists may be appalled by the lack of adherence to traditional forms, but the font should be seen as only “in the spirit of” blackletter, and attempting something that hasn’t been seen or done before—something that feels traditional, yet at the same time fresh and perhaps unexpected.

Hi everyone,

I'm currently trying to talk somebody (trying to reproduce late 1700s style in an English text) out of using the OpenType ›Contextuals‹ feature as a tool to substitute every (!) non-final s by an ſ -- as ſ usage is a lot more complex than that.

Now what this issue reminded me of was having seen a longs_s ligature in an English text once -- an ß, effectively. 17th or 18th century, I guess. I just can't find it. Un-ligated longs_s + s are everywhere, but that's not what I'm looking for.

Used by Decca Music Group in cover and booklet for DVD set released in 2012.
No luck at Bowfin, where I flipped through "formal connected scripts," Identifont, or MyFonts search--which produced over 900 non-matching fonts for the tags "script-calligraphic."
The Z is very Germanic -- appropriate for Mozart's Die Zauberflöte.
So any idea as to the ID of the font?
Don

So this font was found on an old book. Having a real hard time trying to classify this font. I presume it's hand rendered with a calligraphic pen but i have no info on the origins or style of these letter forms. Anyone here got any ideas?

I am looking for a script that would have been used in Germany (specifically the Hessen-Kassel region) in the last quarter of the 18th century. As I understand it, this would have been some type of Fraktur with the long s and ligatures. Perhaps someone here could point me in the right direction?

Hello,
This is an example of a movie-poster typeface drawn by German poster designer Hans Otto Wendt. I am looking for a font with a similar feel. What I particularly love is the brushstroke-look this has goin' on.
Any ideas would be much appreciated!

Greetings! I'd like to know the font of following sentences: "Das Ziel!" and "Sieg für HYDRA!".

The former one looks like Tannenberg, but I don't think it's actually Tannenberg.

Thanks in advance.

Sincerely,
Felix M.

P.S.: The picture is attached to this message, but can also be found here: http://i.imgur.com/L9oTs.jpg

Hello Typophilers.

I was hoping I could get a few recomendations on fonts that feel & look similar to the examples below.

Thanks

jeanly's picture

German San-Serif

I need help identifying this German font face:

Anybody know this one?

Its from an old German Type Catalog. Also, any ideas of other fonts that use the same style as the "n"s?

This one is going on a business card for a distributor, anyone have a guess? No luck with WhatTheFont or IdentiFont. It's the lowercase 'm' that makes me think it's German somehow?

My new project, a compact, solidly constructed realist sans serif that draws its influences from Germany.


It's only got one weight right now (hopefully over time I'll make this a large font family with 6 or 7 weights). I'd love some help getting the rhythm and consistency just right. I can spend hours just focused on one glyph, so it's hard to remember sometimes how crucial rhythm, weight and color are as well.

I just built it from scratch in 48 hours, but any input would be much appreciated!

Cheers,
TB

! UPDATE (2/21): New pdf here!

Prokopius's picture

Font from Gimp

Hi can anybody identify this font. I used it in a presentation which I want to complete now with the same type but I cant remember the name.

Thanks for your help

Prokopius

Greetings type enthusiasts. On a recent trip to Europe I was browsing the newsstands and came across these two lovely typefaces. I thought they were great. I'd like to buy them/download them if possible for my own uses and I was hoping someone out there could help me identify them. Much thanks in advance.

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