Elegant Font?

manyaldesign's picture

I'm creating a logo for an interior design/architecture company, attached image is one of my proposals, but the client keep telling that he need more elegant typeface. I've tried san serif fonts like gill sans and skola sans.
What does he mean by elegant? is it like bodoni/didot, or some scripts or what?


here is my client comment for this design:-
" Can try to add color yellow in the name HAITHAM JAFFER OR in TAG LINE
tag line font size to be revised
try to change name HAITHAM JAFFER font to be more elegant"

Any suggestion for the font(preferably free)? especially something that suits interior design/architecture company

apankrat's picture

Your first task is to understand what he means by "elegant" and the only way to do it is to compile a list of options and see which ones he picks. For all we know he might be thinking something like this.

hrant's picture

Elegant could be: narrow, high contrast and/or gentle modulation (like in Optima, but don't use Optima!).

hhp

Luma Vine's picture

Coming from a client, elegant could be almost anything. Definitely focus on what they are trying to achieve and how it fits into the brand identity they are imagining.

JamesM's picture

Like apankrat said. You need to figure out what the client means; maybe show them some different font samples and ask which one(s) have the feel they're looking for.

Of course as the designer your recommendation may be something totally different than they have in mind, but understanding what they have in mind may help clarify how they view their company and the company's future direction.

manyaldesign's picture

Thanks everyone! I already figure it out, the client meant elegant serif like Bodoni/didot. I've always been confused about the meaning of elegant=Thin/Calligraphy/Fashion etc.

JamesM's picture

> I've always been confused about the meaning of elegant

Words like "elegant" can mean different things to different people.

Same thing with color names. Google a descriptive color name (such as "teal") and you'll see considerable variations. If a client tells me they want a certain color, I pull out a swatch book and make sure we're both thinking of the same thing.

hrant's picture

It's not as bad as that. Sure, ask the client for examples, but if you try too hard to nail down his terminology he's going to think you're dumb and/or insecure.

BTW I need to add to my list: thin.

hhp

Luma Vine's picture

But if you guess wrong then you actually are being "dumb". Don't try to nail down the terminology, just be sure you know what they are trying to communicate and really hear what they are saying to you.

JamesM's picture

> he's going to think you're dumb and/or insecure

Not if it's handled properly. In fact most clients are pleased that you want to understand them clearly.

And it's better to spend 30 seconds pinning down what they mean instead than spending hours on a layout they won't like because you misunderstood them.

hrant's picture

I guess it depends on how much the client wants the designer to follow directions versus doing some creative interpretation. I think the most fruitful client-designer relationships are founded on a sort of trust where making things too explicit neuters the positive potential.

hhp

litera's picture

...and asking them for every single thing makes you look as if you're just creating what they told you. So they don't actually need you to charge them more than any school kid would to just put pieces together.

A nice questionaire at the beginning with letter forms, shapes, colours is a nice test to ask them what they relate each of these shapes to? And then from their brief of the company get the actual liking what will fit their mind. While also giving you enough space of creativity.

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