First typeface (and first post) - Please have a look and provide any feedback

Just Be Thankful's picture

Hi,

after playing around on Illustrator for a while, I seem to have fallen into creating my first typeface. Initially based around impossible shapes inspired by Escher etc the typeface soon evolved rather naturally to what you see now. Built up by a strict grid all characters are the same width except for the m w and i and the numbers are slightly thinner.

I am looking to open up fontlab for the first time and hopefully cement this as a working font. If you guys could provide me with your thoughts that would be great, I feel like this is a whole new world I have uncovered!

Also so far I have created just letters and numbers, how many other characters would you advise designing for a display font?

Many thanks

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Riley.gif25.43 KB
Just Be Thankful's picture

My first typeface draft, feedback is very much welcome

hrant's picture

An Escherian font is a nice idea, and I really like your curvy terminals.

all characters are the same width except for the m w and i

I can't think of a good reason to do that... Either all the characters should be the same width (AKA monospace font) which can be a useful feature, or let each character be the width it needs.

BTW, call it Maurits.

hhp

eliason's picture

Working well: I, K, N, 4 (though the triangular counter is too small), 8
Not working: B, 3
Q would be more legible if the tail went rightward instead.
The grid has served its purpose, now be ready to depart from it where useful.

Just Be Thankful's picture

Thanks for the replies. My initial plan was to have it monospaced but after developing it some letters didnt suit being the same width such as the i. Departing from the grid definately seems like a good idea.

The terminals were originally set as straight 45 degreed lines but I ended up going with the curves to make it a bit different. In the end I would quite like to have the curved and straight options available.

I had considered Maurits as the name. I put down Riley after Bridget Riley but its all still in consideration and open to offers.

William Berkson's picture

Fun idea! Some nice execution, some problems as Craig notes. If you can get more depth illusions into some characters, like the C, it would make it more consistent and stronger.

Just Be Thankful's picture

Thanks, I did seem a bit unsure of referring it to Escher when not all the letters were impossible shapes! I'll see what I can add to the rest of them

dberlow's picture

"...all characters are the same width except for the m w and i and the numbers are slightly thinner..."

This is perfectly normal for a modular display face.

Just Be Thankful's picture

If I keep it as a modular typeface should I be optically refining it or keeping it strict within its composition?

William Berkson's picture

Visual coherence is much more important than relationship to the grid, in my opinion, but then I've never tried to stick to a grid. If you have the marked depth illusion on all the characters, then those that are impossible will have even more punch, I think. Remember they will be in words, so the conflict between possible and impossible will have its own play. I think having the terminal curves and width more consistent will help a lot. This part needs to be a bit more uniform, I think. Eg the C terminals are different.

eliason's picture

If I keep it as a modular typeface should I be optically refining it or keeping it strict within its composition?

Get this into a font editor, set some words, and make your decision based on that.

hrant's picture

But David, wouldn't the "G" for example benefit from being allowed to be wider? As long as even just one letter is breaking the monospace mold (thus making the font generally unusable for making everything line up) why not just fugetaboutit?

hhp

dberlow's picture

Hrant, I think monospace and modular, are two different things.

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