"Hardware" for typographers

sendoushi's picture

Hey,

I was searching today for pens to help typographers do they work.
Found out Pilot Parallel which seems pretty interesting since i'm left-handed and it's an afordable pen but... what better place to question this than typophile?

What "hardware" do you use to help yourself creating letters?

Chris Dean's picture

@enne_son: Thank you. I look forward to more of the same. I’m an advocate of plain language, and by making complex ideas like these accessible to the lay-typographer, we are empowering them, and facilitating their participation in such discussions. It’s been my experience that it is far more difficult to communicate complex ideas to a general audience than it is to another specialist.

Chris Dean's picture

Don’t forget those silly bendy blue rulers.” I never could get the hang of these.

Ryan Maelhorn's picture

Get a ruler with cork on the back, no sliding.

Chris Dean's picture

Ah, however, when I started and we did things by hand, the cork on the back of the ruler raised it about 1/16" off the surface of the page which left too much room for play when using a pen or blade. We were instructed to turn it upside-down for greater accuracy. That, and the measurements weren’t nearly accurate enough compared to our precision rules.

Ryan Maelhorn's picture

Very good point, Chris. It's surprising how hard it is sometimes to make a straight line with a straight edge, especially when you have to apply enough pressure to cut through something else.

Is it better to have an edge that likely wont move, or an edge that is right on top of the paper and so minimizes wobbling? It is a good question.

hrant's picture

The only important thing about a ruler (besides being straight) is that you can see through it.

hhp

russellm's picture

Accuracy is a thing unto itself. If it looks right, it is right.

Chris, I have one of those, my wife bought for me years ago at Charette in NYC, now long since disappeared.

Chris Dean's picture

@hrant: Agree. The translucency of the Schaedler Precision Rules was always a great help.

@russellm: :P

russellm's picture

... & hand grenades.

"if it looks right it is right"... I work with engineers. They need to have hands held when it comes to optical correctness in graphic design.

:o)

It would appear I have consumed all available beer.
:o\

BTW, Chris, nice new icon... Mr. Dean

Chris Dean's picture

Thanks. It’s an original Shinn. See:

http://typophile.com/node/96485

hrant's picture

Peter, your suggestion is interesting, in terms of trying to extract what really works in spite of details which might be misconceived. I guess sort of "meta" what Rogers did when making Centaur.

hhp

enne_son's picture

Hrant I was thinking the the blurring should be so extreme that even a vague sense of edges is missing. The exercise is not one of finding edges but of creating new pathways through a frosted glass darkly.

sendoushi's picture

@Cristopher Dean: Why and what for do you use flexible curve? Never really found a use for it on typography

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