Fontlab TT Encoding Cross Platform?

peterbruhn's picture

I've just finished the work of a type family for a client. The fonts are Reg, Italic, Nold and Bold Italic.
Since I wanted to learn more about Fontlab, I did the the last kerning and hinting there.

Now I'm ready to generate, but there's so many encodings to choose from my head is spinning.

It's a TrueType family and it should work for both Mac and PC. I used the Fontlab Standard Encoding (in Name mode) to be sure I didn't get any platform conflicts.
When I try to change to Unicode mode everything changes. Which codepages should I choose?

If I choose Mac Roman, which is the equalent PC encoding in Fontlab? I still need to keep the standard diacritic characters.

alan's picture

I think Adobe Standard encoding is the safest bet. I only use that for Type 1 fonts, but it should work for TT as well. The naming also has to be right for them to work cross-platform.

Alan

peterbruhn's picture

Thank you Alan.
Unfortunaly, with Adobe Standard Encoding I loose all the standard diacritics.

I finally used MacOS Roman and MSWindows 1252 Latin1. I'll loose some unimportant (for the client) characters but that's OK.

alan's picture

That's odd. If you have them already designed, they should not be lost. Which version are you using?

peterbruhn's picture

4.5.1 - macOSX 10.2.4

If I choose Adobe Standard encoding some of the charcters aren marked with yellow anymore.
I thought it was a sign of those charcters not being able to be used? Or am I wrong?

alan's picture

I think the grey bar above the character just means that it is outside the normal scope of the encoding, but they will still be included. It's true, if you create a new "empty" font and immediately switch it to Adobe Standard, those accented slots won't be there. But if they're already represented in your font file, they should export properly.

My understanding is that that is the entire point of Adobe Standard encoding: to be cross-platform. It provides a basic set of characters that can be extended, without the font then being considered as "custom" encoding.

Alan

Syndicate content Syndicate content