Anybody have an idea what this (seemingly simple) font is?

projectxz2005's picture

The font is in this logo. I think it is something like Gotham / Avenir / Proxima Novo...?
Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Josev's picture

Gotham Medium

projectxz2005's picture

Thank you! That was killing me!
:)

Josev's picture

You're welcome. You knew what it was, I just confirmed. You can set sample text using the fonts on most sites. Just click on "Test Drive" in the nav on H&FJ's page: http://www.typography.com/fonts/font_overview.php?productLineID=100008&p...

R.'s picture

Slightly off-topic: There are decent ‘test drive’ implementations on a couple of foundry websites (at Typotheque, for one), but to my mind, H&FJ’s is particularly unhelpful. You can’t change the size of the letters and you get all the samples on a lined background, which makes it nearly impossible to judge the glyphs especially of light cuts. And when you want to include characters as exotic as ‘é’, these will be replaced by a question mark. Apparently, their clientele does not need a more sophisticated sample setting system.

hrant's picture

I used to say this all the time, and this is a chance to bring it up again: any type tester that adds a disruptive pattern to the rendering is unnecessarily paranoid. In fact letting people swipe screengrabs is more beneficial than harmful: it creates a dependency that can translate into a sale of the actual font. And really, you can't convince people to buy your fonts by not letting them abuse the tester - they'll just move on to another font house.

hhp

R.'s picture

Well, H&FJ apparently have enough customers who don’t move on to other foundries, the type tester notwithstanding. Still, I don’t understand the approach of neither offering PDF samples nor providing the potential customer with a proper instrument to try out the fonts. Why would you want your own typefaces to look bad and incomplete, as they do in a type tester with a patterned background and not even complete ASCII support? In any case: I agree with you, Hrant, that type testers like this will rather frighten off genuine customers than prevent unlicensed font use (or whatever they are supposed to prevent).

hrant's picture

What is "enough customers"? I think H&FJ do a lot of things well, some things exceptionally well - but I also think they are protectionist to the point of harming themselves. Note that this is a foundry that used to be accused of being way too sue-happy; fortunately they changed. Hopefully their type-tester/PDF attitude will too.

hhp

R.'s picture

I don’t know what ‘enough customers’ would be for H&FJ. But: I am not surprised that they stick with existing solutions if they are satisfied with the way their business is going. I as a potential customer have always been put off by the fact that I couldn’t get a detailed sample of their typefaces on their website. They probably can send you a PDF, but I don’t like having to ask for that. However: Not offering PDFs for download, like deciding to not implement a better type tester, seems to be a deliberate choice to attract certain customers (who don’t need this or who want to get in touch with them anyway). Do you agree?

hrant's picture

But their prices don't correlate with the "elitist" attitude of the tester. TEFF for example gives out PDFs that are 600dpi images, and all they have in the way of a tester is large horizontal GIFs! But that matches their stratospheric pricing: their products are things you need to spend time getting intimately familiar with before putting down the money.

hhp

oldnick's picture

As I see it, the basic idea behind the backgrounds in type testers is to prevent cheapskates from using them as free headline generators—à la PLINC—for web projects, or—if the cheapskates are also disinterested in the quality of the finished project—for print projects as well.

My long experience with offering freebies tells me two things: a) determined thieves will have their way, regardless of any precautions you may take to thwart them; and b) it is highly unlikely that you will ever turn inveterate cheapskates into paying customers.

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