Colvert typeface

Jonathan Fabreguettes's picture


I am happy to announce the release of our new typeface: Colvert.

Colvert is made by four designers: Natalia Chuvatin, Jonathan Perez, Kristyan Sarkis and Irene Vlachou.

 Colvert is comprised of four families: Colvert Arabic, Colvert Cyrillic, Colvert Greek and Colvert Latin. These four type families can be used alone, or blended with one another, in an harmonious way. Each family has been made by a designer native speaker of the concerned writing system. 



This character has been envisioned as a peculiar approach to the question of the relationship between different writing systems. Each of the four families that make up Colvert is as visually differentiated as possible. We have tried to establish a minimum optical continuity and not to seek homogeneity between these type families, so each one can express at the best its own characteristics. 



Colvert includes all that seems to us necessary for the professional use of a publishing typeface for print: extended support for languages (more than 100 languages), small capitals (Cyrillic, Greek and Latin), oldstyle figures, polytonic Greek and Arabic ligatures.



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To download the type specimen, see this page on the website of our foundry.
For more information on Colvert Arabic, see this page on the website of Kristyan Sarkis.
Arabic Production made by Mathieu Réguer.

Yours sincerely
 
Jonathan Perez
www.typographies.fr

riccard0's picture

Impressive feat!

hrant's picture

Wow. Deep congrats.
I need to take a closer look at this...

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

It’s interesting that the common glyphs in Greek-Latin-Cyrillic are not identical.
There’s no reason they need to be, except perhaps in multi-script display settings.
Did you experiment with that kind of layout?

Jonathan Fabreguettes's picture

Thanks for your comments.
About your question: the goal was to work on differenciation, but we have tried to avoid taking systematic decisions. For each glyph, we have tried to think wether it is interesting/logical or not to make a differenciation.
Then, when we have taken the decision, I think we must keep this, even at display sizes (even if we can imagine how we design the difference could change between text and display sizes).

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