Please Read: Typophile (TEMP)

Jared Benson's picture

Change is hard.

But the Flash home page had to go. We all knew it was way past its prime.

This temporary Typophile theme you're seeing now puts us back at our roots, in a way. Since 2000, Typophile has been a vibrant community focused around these very forums. It's a community built around a love for the craft of typography and design, and these forums have been home to hundreds of thousands of conversations around type.

Don't worry, this is not the new permanent look for Typophile. It's merely a temporary state while we tighten up a new look for Typophile. Removing the Flash is the first big necessary step toward correcting a number of other bugs (file upload, anyone?) that have been plaguing us. Rather than take the site down while we get things squared away, we opted to keep it up so you can talk type while we're heads-down on the new Typophile.

Yes, we know the theme is not perfect. Go easy, make constructive suggestions and we'll make CSS tweaks as we go.

Most of all, get involved!

Renaissance Man's picture

How about a way of sorting by the number of new replies?

oldnick's picture

I really don't want to wade through six pages of replies to see if this comment is redundant, but you have some serious issues with your imageWrap class.

Thomas Phinney's picture

I'd love to not have to drill down a level to get to "track" my threads I am involved in. You already display the "my blog" link on the main page under "My profile," why not put "track" under there? I think it gets used a lot.

T

Mark Simonson's picture

Just go to this URL then bookmark it:

http://typophile.com/tracker/(yourTypophileMemberNumber)

Note: Use your Typophile member number instead of that parenthetical thing.

eliason's picture

On some posts (example: http://typophile.com/node/91091) anchors like #new or #comment- don't work.

I'm still seeing this and hoping it gets fixed!

kentlew's picture

Me, too. And I’ve even tried to figure out what could be causing it, but I haven’t yet uncovered the culprit.

The anchors look to be properly set in the html. But for some reason, on certain nodes, after loading the page, it immediately returns to the top, overriding the named anchors.

kentlew's picture

Actually, I think I might have just figured out the culprit. I believe that this behavior only happens on threads with attachments. And I believe the culprit is the "sticky-enabled" class that is written on the table that presents any attachments. The class itself doesn’t seem to have rules in the CSS, but it is triggering some Javascript which then rewrites an invisible "sticky-header" table, which forces the pageload back to the top.

I believe that the "sticky-enabled" class is a mistake and shouldn’t be enabled by default on those threads.

I’ll write to Jared and have him investigate the template.

apankrat's picture

Ahem... with regards to tracking and/or following (bookmarking, etc).

There should really be a simple per-thread flag called "track", and all flagged threads will go onto the list on the /track page. The flag should be automatically set when one adds a comment to a thread, and it should be possible to toggle it manually.

This way if I want to follow particular thread without participating, I'd click on "track" button on thread's page and it will do it. Alternatively, if I commented on a thread, but no longer interested in it, I'd click on "track" the same way and it will remove thread from /track.

If anyone knows a simpler way to organize this, do speak out.

hrant's picture

Sounds just right.

hhp

Jared Benson's picture

@Thomas: I've added "My posts" under "My profile" which links to your personal tracker.

@apankrat: We've tried a few methods for this in the past, but none have quite delivered the results we had wanted. I'd like to see this feature happen too, and will keep looking into it.

Thomas Phinney's picture

Jared: Thanks!

Yes, @pankrat's suggestion would be ideal. This was just the low-hanging fruit.

hrant's picture

Feature request: sort by unread. What I mean is a way to see the threads that have a new post (and/or threads that have never been visited) no matter how old they are (but sorted reverse-chronologically).

hhp

brianskywalker's picture

I agree with Hrant's comment. It's easy enough to sort by number of replies, and that's almost useless. Sorting by unread replies is what is needed.

riccard0's picture

If you’re not going to axe the the various “Solved IDs” subsections, you could at least remove the “Solved IDs” part and leave them for the good willing posters.

hrant's picture

For the record, assuming anybody cares: I've come to terms with no longer doing manual linebreaks*. I do have to think however that Typophile's new narrow and leaded layout has been key to that. Anyway, thank you.

* Although I'm still doing them in email, because I'm assuming the more important something is the less likely it will be viewed on a small screen.

hhp

marcox's picture

Hrant, I think your email thinking may be inverted. In the Always-Connected World of Commerce and Communication©, the important emails are read when they arrive, regardless of location, and often on a mobile device.

hrant's picture

I agree that their receipt is usually on-the-go, but if important emails are being read when focus is in short supply, that's pretty sad. But it would explain a lot, so maybe you're right. :-/

I guess I'm just not in sync with this mess that passes for society. Actually I was never in sync, even before mobile browsing, or even (personal) computers. It's a good thing I make text fonts and not Hollywood movies.

--

So what's it gonna take for the web to implement a max-column-width feature?

hhp

Thomas Phinney's picture

I agree with Marcox.

I read at least half my email on my cell phone the first time. If it warrants response, and I don't feel like doing that from the phone, I flag it or mark it unread so I will look at it again when I have a proper keyboard.

riccard0's picture

And, in any case, e-mail softwares do have a “max-column-width feature”.
Outllook even has a “remove excessive line breaks” “feature” on by default, which, of course, wreaks havoc on manually formatted e-mails.

dezcom's picture

Since the beginning of word processing, I have always been driven mad by the use of hard returns. In those days, people were used to the typewriter where a carriage return, multiple tabs or spaces all had the same effect. It was printed on paper and then re-typed by a type house so what the customer did formatting meant little. Along comes the transition to electronically captured word processing being sent via tape or disk to the type house which then was bound to absorb the tedious labor of taking away all the problematic typing done by his clients. Now comes the all-in-one process where the page layout person and type house are the same individual. Even much worse, today comes the multiple device viewing of a single digital flow of text. Bunches of browsers, bunches of hand-held devices, bunches of resolutions, bunches of default typefaces, different platforms and versions of the software, some subpixel rendering and some not, some greyscale and some not. The odds of what the enduser sees on his device looking exactly like it did on the original authors source device is quite slim. The only prayer of workable shifts in devices is if everyone strictly avoids hard returns or multiple tabs or spaces to push a line break that only looks good on their screen. The end user at least knows where a paragraph ends. This is one heck of a lot better than trying to mind read the original author or guess what system they used to write the darn thing. What you may think you are fixing for 2% of your readers, you are totally fuchking up for 98% of your readers.

Chris Dean's picture

The scaling here is funky. Its hard for me to articulate as I don’t make internets, but:

If I make the type smaller, the column width stays the same so my character count goes up.

But, there appears to be a max column width (or min char count?). When I increase the type size to what I find comfortable, it maxes out at about 30 cpl, which is far too short (it just means a shit-ton of return-saccades which results in fatigue). If I try to make it bigger, the column width and the type get bigger at the same time.

I’m really happy to see black type, but if increasing the size of the type so I can read it results in me having to read 35 character lines, I simply won’t bother reading.

And you can check my metrics on that. Since the redesign, I have gone from ~1 visit an hour to ~1 visit/day.

Perhaps we can have a no comments thread for admins to provide status updates? Given the afore mentioned typographic problems, I simply am quite simply physically incapable of sifting through 6 pages of comments to find relevant updates.

hrant's picture

I've been having a HELL of a time searching Typophile, I mean even through Google... Stuff that I used to be able to find immediately simply won't show up any more no matter how smartly I search. Is there some kind of blocking going on? Maybe due to that stupid FontQueen phishing site?

hhp

Chris Dean's picture

Totally agree w hrant. Same problems for me just the other day.

riccard0's picture

I experienced the same from some time now. I’m not sure it’s just the result of Google rebuilding its indexes or a more general problem.

Michel Boyer's picture

I had not noticed, but you are right. I get nothing after April 17. Bing seems to work fine.

Chris Dean's picture

Any progress on the line length? As it stands, I simply can’t read long posts without getting tired/frustrated.

hrant's picture

Here's how a long paragraph currently looks on my system:

I think it's relatively easy on the eyes and brain (although more paragraph breaks would help). But to be fair I'm using a very old OS. :->

hhp

dezcom's picture

Hrant,
What you posted above is about 30% longer, 50% lighter, and 25% smaller than what I see on my system. Mine is less than a year old, if that matters.

Bert Vanderveen's picture

Ouch Hrant, that is unbelievably wretched… Hurts the eyes. Must take years of the sustainability of your eyesight.

hrant's picture

Are you serious? I would like it more with some judicious anti-alaising (which would additionally put some nice extra weight on it) but to me it's worlds better than the rendering on Chris's system: dark , blurry, too tight.

Might there be a gamma issue at play?

BTW, I've been looking at forms like this since 1977, and my eyesight is still 20/15.

hhp

apankrat's picture

Well, good thing hrant didn't post a photo of a green-on-black monochrome CRT screen :)

hrant's picture

Not green dude!
http://oldcomputers.net/pics/pet2001.jpg
But we got the high-end model: 8K of RAM! The floppy drive though was too expensive - I remember it was such a hot thing to daydream about...

BTW, you try making Armenian and Arabic fonts on an 8×7 grid! :-)
(Actually though that was on my C64.)

hhp

riccard0's picture

It's clear by now that Google has stopped indexing Typophile.
Typophile's own search function is notoriously pretty useless. And now the internal Google search is too.
Searching for something using "site:typophile.com" yields only useless list views results. The few single posts hits are from improbable subdomains such as, among others, "ww.typophile.com", "dev.typophile.com", and my favourite so far "area51.academy.typophile.com".
I don't know if this situation is the result of some setting not being adjusted once the new version went live, or if it's the rel="nofollow" applied to RSS, or some misconfiguration of robots.txt.

All I know is that not trying to address this problem is suicidal.

Demmy's picture

More girls.

hrant's picture

There's certainly something fishy (phishy?) going on and I wish the Typophile boys would give us a clue... It's pretty frustrating (when you have to look for something). Those 3rd+ level domains are of course under Typophile's control, so it seems to be a sort of effort at protection. Recently thefontqueen.com was indexing everything, but then anti-phishing message started popping up... In any case, it's a mess.

hhp

dezcom's picture

I used to see thousands of hits on Typophile when searching typographic material via Google. It seems Google has blackballed Typophile for some unexplained reason?

sim's picture

I've just made a search on Google for Typophile material and to me it's still working.

kentlew's picture

It seems Google has blackballed Typophile for some unexplained reason?

Possibly because of all the SEO spam. There’s tons of it in the database, even if pages/nodes are unpublished. (you don’t even want to know how much ends up in the profile fields of bogus accounts — it’s impossible to stay on top of). I don’t know if these end up getting harvested by Google bots and result in blacklisting or not, but I worry about it.

dezcom's picture

You are right, Kent. The spam barrage is just maddening.

paragraph's picture

Anonymous posting welcome? Typophile gets what it deserves ...

JamesM's picture

The spam would end immediately if a new person's first post had to be approved by a moderator before appearing.

It's a procedure that's used at many forums to prevent spam.

dezcom's picture

James, would that prevent it or just delay it until the second post?

JamesM's picture

If the first post contains spam, the account gets deleted. Now if a spammer takes the time to post a legitimate, on-topic message about typography, and then comes back later to make a 2nd post that is spam, I suppose that's conceivable, but I doubt if that would happen. They use a hit-and-run strategy.

dezcom's picture

Then it just becomes a labor problem for Punchcut

JamesM's picture

It's easy for me to give advice since I'm not the one who'd have to do the work. ;)

William Berkson's picture

Has Typophile enabled e-mail verification as a requirement before posting? Does that reduce spam?

kentlew's picture

Typophile has a captcha on the registration form and requires a valid e-mail account to receive an activation link with a system-generated password. No, it does not reduce spam. (Or rather, there seems to be plenty in spite of this; who knows how much worse it could be.)

There is no e-mail verification required to post (and no way to require it, within the current setup), since it’s assumed that that was handled at account registration.

James, as you must realize, your suggestion is labor-intensive at this point. That’s not to say that Punchcut couldn’t revamp the back-end and maybe find some Drupal plug-ins to manage something along those lines. (Or pay someone to manage the site ;-) But history would suggest that this is not likely.

And you might be surprised at how many spam accounts already post seemingly innocuous comments initially (as well as other strategies) in an attempt to validate their presence.

JamesM's picture

> your suggestion is labor-intensive at this point

Actually I'm not sure that it would be. Does anyone know how many new accounts are set up per day? If there are, say, 4 new accounts one day that make a 1st post, and a moderator takes 15 seconds to glance at each and click an "approved" button, then it takes 1 minute.

If a 1st post is spam and the account needs to be deleted, then no more time is spent than it takes under the current system to delete a spam account.

(This assumes that the software is set up to present a moderator with a list of 1st posts from new accounts that need to be approved, so that he/she can review them efficiently.)

> And you might be surprised at how many spam accounts already
> post seemingly innocuous comments initially

OK. I'm not saying the system would be perfect, but I think it would weed out a lot of the spam.

Just a thought. I know it's unlikely to be tried.

hrant's picture

We're at ~200,000 users, divided by ~12 years = almost 50 new users a day.

That's the price of being important (but there must be ways to reduce abuse).

Besides spam, one thing we can/should do is exterminate the ID parasites.

hhp

JamesM's picture

> almost 50 new users a day.

Wow, that's way more than I expected! Although my guess is that the majority of them are readers rather than posters.

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