Pronounciation of Calibri?

LadyJemima's picture

There's been a recent discussion at my school on how to pronounce this font. Did a Google search and a bunch of different opinions came up. There seem to be three possibilities:

ka-LEE-bree

KAL-ih-bree

ka-LIHB-ree

Now, I personally say "KAL-ih-bree" but am wondering if it is actually "ka-LEE-bree". Does anyone know the OFFICIAL pronunciation?

Thomas Phinney's picture

ka-LEE-bree

At least, that's how the designer and the folks in the Microsoft typography team refer to it.

froo's picture

"Calibri" means "calibers".

Té Rowan's picture

I tend to pronounce it like KAH-lih-bree.

Trevor Baum's picture

ka-LEE-bree

riccard0's picture

Calibri. In Italian you pronounce it as it is written ;-)

froo's picture

Certamente ;-)

HVB's picture

Slightly off-topic, but it has bothered me since its anouncement that the name "Corbel" was given to a sans-serif font, given that a corbel is a supporting bracket - eminently suitable for supporting a serif!

- Herb VB

johndberry's picture

For the record, the pronunciations of the six Western font families introduced by Microsoft in the ClearType font collection, as their designers pronounce them:

Calibri – kah-LEE-bree
Corbel – kor-BELL
Candara – kan-DAH-rah
Cambria – KAM-bree-ah
Constantia – kon-STAN-tsee-ah*
Consolas – KON-soh-lahs

* Even within Microsoft, there are variant pronunciations. Although the designer, John Hudson, pronounces Constantia with a "ts" sound for the second t, I've mostly heard it as kon-STAN-tee-ah, with a simple "t" sound, and that's how I read it myself. (Perhaps this is just a residue of my having learned classical Latin pronunciation.)

In a similar vein, the font name Segoe is usually pronounced sih-GOH within Microsoft, although the designer, Tom Rickner, named it after a street in Madison, Wisconsin, where it's pronounce SEE-goh. (The street was named after a city planner of that name.) But I've even heard people ask whether it should be pronounced SEG-way – which I suppose is a logical extrapolation from the musical term "segue." That's the trouble with only reading a word, and not hearing it spoken.

Mark Simonson's picture

It's not a real typeface unless a substantial number of people are not sure how to pronounce its name.

Té Rowan's picture

So much for Times New Roman, then. Anyway, with the C-class, I tend to pronounce their names with emphasis on the first syllable. Very common in Icelandic, btw. Suspect that the other pronunciations are due to regional influences.

John Hudson's picture

John B: Although the designer, John Hudson, pronounces Constantia with a "ts" sound for the second t, I've mostly heard it as kon-STAN-tee-ah, with a simple "t" sound, and that's how I read it myself. (Perhaps this is just a residue of my having learned classical Latin pronunciation.)

I think either is fine. I pronounce it with the 'ts' sound because around the time when I was looking for a name for the typeface -- which had to begin with C, to fit with the other CT fonts -- I was singing some Gregorian chant and this word leaped off the page at me. So I pronounce it according to the liturgical Latin convention.

Susiehuff's picture

It's not a real typeface unless a substantial number of people are not sure how to pronounce its name.

True that.

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