Contrasting types - what do you think?

dl's picture

I'm trying to finish my own logo - it's an update for my established design business, and my customers are home industry contractors, historic architectural preservation, food, wine, coffee, non-profit and other odds & end industries.

For type, I'm going for a hint of Arts & Craft/Art Nouveau, without going overboard. The san serif is custom, and the serif is Mackinac Pro (just put out by P22). I like how its ampersand matches the curves of my icon.

What do you think of this combination? Is the Mackinac too round for the custom type?

I'm only asking for opinion on the type. The icon is not up for discussion.

Note: PLEASE SCROLL TO COMMENT BELOW FOR TYPE IMAGE.

Nick Shinn's picture

Why not "Insert image"? (See below).

dl's picture

Is the image not inserted? I thought it was, but I can never figure this out. Let me know otherwise. Thanks

Luma Vine's picture

The composition is what seems the most distracting to me. Why are you overlapping things? What is the intended message, impression or meaning behind that? I am afraid it is starting to make your graphic look like clipart or some sort of watermark rather than an icon. I know the symbol is not up for discussion, but you might do well to consider some of the technical issues (thin lines vanish at smaller sizes, reproduction in more limited colors, etc.).

The word Adunate feels a bit like a mutant. There is not enough clarity to why some letters have serifs and some don't, for example. Hope that helps.

dl's picture

Good point on the serifs. Can't believe I missed those!! They will be fixed. What's your thought specifically of the two fonts together? How do you think Mackinac fits with this?

dl's picture

So here's a revision on the san serif. (once again, can't believe I missed that before. Duh! Shows how you can't see things you've been working on too long:-)

Here's my thought process: In my business, I do both design and writing. I unite the two elements of visual design for successful communication. My name is Latin for unite, as in the joining together of many parts to equal a whole.

With that thought in mind, what's your thought on the combination of these two types?

Nick Shinn's picture

Logo design 101: make it simple enough that it will work in just about any medium at any size.

This is way too complex, and would fall apart under the slightest adversity. CMYK for instance.

Even if you ran three spot colors, there would be serious registration problems.

Just imagine that one day you would like to have classy stationery with engraving, foil stamping or embossing, with letterpress type.

Don't design the logo in isolation, but in the context of your business card, which is often your first (and most lasting) impression.

dl's picture

Everyone, thanks for your thoughts on the icon. However, PLEASE, I'm only asking about the two typefaces. The only reason I initially included the icon is to show the idea of contrast.

I also want to convey the idea of contrast with type. What do you think of these two together? Working? Not working?

Please, just critique the TYPE.

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