Font request - kana/runic fusion?

Penda's picture

Hi. I'm not sure if this is the right place for this, but it must be worth a try.

I have a bizarre font request.

Purely for personal fun, I’m interested in a sans-serif futhorc (Anglo-Saxon runes) set evolved to resemble the Japanese kana (either katakana or hiragana), while still identifiable as futhorc. Preferably matching the dimensions and weight of simplified Chinese characters in another font (I expect creating your own hanzi font would be much too time-consuming).

I keep some private notes in a mixed runic/hanzi script, and a font like this would be amazing to see, but perhaps challenging to produce.

I would be willing to make a donation in return for such a font (only a small one, though), and I would use it a lot and enjoy it.

If this sounds like an interesting project, give it a try.

Si_Daniels's picture

>I would be willing to make a donation in return for such a font

Perhaps you have something you could barter for such a font. Maybe a ring with magical properties or a crystal with a special power.

Ray Larabie's picture

Sounds like fun. Contact me and I'll wrangle some letters for you.
http://typodermicfonts.com/pages/about

Andreas Stötzner's picture

It sounds not so funny for me, it rather sounds like an interesting exercise for the typographical mind at least. If it is to become a project as well this is another question.

It’s once again about graphically harmonizing different scripts, what about we have struggled so far for at least twelve years now …
Runes and Kana, sounds a bit strange at the first glance, but it isn’t a strange thing at all. I have worked on harmonizing Runes to Latin and airport pictos to Greek … funny yes, but very serious kind of fun ;-)

Why “sans serif”?

@ Simon: you and your folks should have been the first band to seriously think about harmonizing Runes to Kana and Arabic and Gujarati and Cherokee and … but you didn’t bother. We all know :-)

Penda's picture

Yeah, it is interesting. Runes weren't designed with paper or brushes in mind and were intended for carving, so it would be good to see a modern evolution of the script. Chinese characters and runes are my two favourite writing systems and, although I can use them together, it doesn't have much aesthetic appeal.

On the other hand, kana and kanji in Japanese (a mixed system) go together nicely. I love looking at Japanese text even though I can't read it. It seems well balanced, with the kanji making skim-reading easy and the kana breaking it up, so it doesn't look as dense as Chinese text.

If I could make my own mixed system (runes and simplified hanzi) look that good, it would please me greatly.

As for the magic ring and crystals, I have none of those to give. :P

And I don't have anything against serif fonts, it's just that a nice, clean sans-serif font is my priority.

Si_Daniels's picture

>@ Simon: you and your folks should have been the first band to seriously think about harmonizing Runes to Kana and Arabic and Gujarati and Cherokee and … but you didn’t bother. We all know :-)

If you bothered to download Windows 8 you'd know that we actually did. Sort of. :-)

>As for the magic ring and crystals, I have none of those to give. :P

Glad you could see my comment was a just a joke. The project does sound interesting. Best of luck with it.

oprion's picture

Bronze script surely comes to mind as an early incised form of Chinese characters that were rather rune-like in appearance.

dudefellow's picture

This differs from what the original poster requested, but one thing leads to another.
Taking the tendencies in the unification of scripts (see http://www.typophile.com/node/94050 and http://www.typophile.com/node/106261) to extreme simplification, this resulted [See image DKhanzyr1JPG]. The source influences are at a glance barely discernable; the A from the runes (and it looks as though the Anglo-Saxon rune Yr is turned into E), the B from Cyrillic, the H from Hebrew, as examples. Instead, the overall effect evokes Japanese katakana. Needless to say, it is Latin.

Jongseong's picture

Imitating hiragana would be challenging due to the profusion of curves inherent in that script. Katakana would be a more suitable model.

In fact, Chinese characters would be the easiest. The predominant text serif style (Song/Ming) is quite angular compared to the brushy finish of the kana glyphs that they are paired with. Characters like 打 even look a bit runish.

But from what the original poster asked for, it looks like we should imagine futhorc evolved to be written in the same traditional manner as kana, that is, with the brush. A sort of an alternative-history-type fiction. It could be a fun exercise, and for inspiration you could look at examples of Arabic or Indic scripts written in the style of Chinese calligraphy.

quadibloc's picture

And just yesterday, I saw a post here by someone working on a Hebrew/Runic fusion typeface, with illustrations of his progress.

dudefellow's picture

quadibloc 13 Sep 2013 — 8:37pm: "And just yesterday, I saw a post here by someone working on a Hebrew/Runic fusion typeface, with illustrations of his progress."

That must have been me, but it is posted in the Serif Critique section (see the two relevant nodes discernible above in dudefellow 13 Sep 2013 — 11:13am), not under this discussion. I only saw this kana/runic fusion topic after I had made designs for the Hebrew and Runic combination, and was already beginning to think that some of its elements appear in Katakana, which is why I posted here afterwards.

It should not be too difficult to design a Runic typeface to blend in to some extent with a chosen Chinese or Japanese system font, by using similar stroke thicknesses and brush-like terminals. However, in Runes generally horizontal lines are avoided whereas in Chinese characters they are prominent. This should cause the two systems of writing used together to be contrasted. Nevertheless, there are certain aspects to usual regular modes of Chinese writing that favour proximity to runes more than typical Latin scripts, because of the absence of complete curves or bowls. The lines in Chinese are mainly straight and only curve slightly as they are in runes. Of course, there are other Chinese styles that have undulations and other fuller curved lines, but I have never seen them being used in modern extended text. I would suggest therefore that the oblique lines of the runes be given slight catenary curvature, similar in fact to, but not as pronounced as, some of those in the Runic/Hebrew merger shown at http://www.typophile.com/node/106261.

Syndicate content Syndicate content