New site: Type Library

blank's picture

Every semester my students ask me for a lists of books about typography, lettering, calligraphy, and type design. To make list keeping easier for all involved I set up a new web site, Type Library, that includes a wide range of books with links for purchasing them. Please check it out and let me know what you think.

And I realize that there are a great many books not on the list. I will keep adding to the list as time allows.

Mark Simonson's picture

I would recommend adding Lettering Design, by Michael Harvey, to the Lettering section. Lettering for Reproduction, by David Gates, is also good. Both of these books are out of print (I think) and the techniques are pre-digital, but they cover a lot of useful principles that are relevant to type design as well.

apankrat's picture

> with links for purchasing them

With affiliate links to be precise. Not that I mind, but still.

blank's picture

With affiliate links to be precise.

Out-of-print books don't pay for themselves ;)

blank's picture

And since the Amazon thing got brought up, I will be adding WorldCat links later. Right now I want to get the basics working so I have less to fix when something needs fixing.

Chris Dean's picture

Very nice work. A few more from the literature section of my “website.”

Canadian Department of Heritage (1994). Access series: design guidelines for media accessibility. (Cat. No. R64-182/5-1993E)

Dyson, M.C. (1999). Typography through the eyes of a psychologist. Hyphen, 2(1), 5–13.

Ehses, H. (1976). Design Papers 1. Semiotic Foundations of Typography. NSCAD University. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Hartley, James (1994). Designing instructional text. Kogan Page, London, England.

Müller-Brockmann, J. (1981). Grid systems in graphic design. Arthur Niggli Limited, Switzerland.

Tschichold, J. (1962). The form of the book. Hartley & Marks Publishers Inc. Washington, United States.

Probably want to mention The Crystal Goblet.

And I lost this book. Great collection of essays.

http://www.amazon.com/Looking-Closer-Vol-Classic-Writings/dp/1581150229/...

See also, an older thread, Typophiles with blogs/websites.

Visible Language, formerly The Journal of Typographic Research, is pretty nice too.

This reminds me, I have an entire library of my own to add. In the meantime, feel free to browse my Literature and Links sections. You might find something useful.

Chris Dean's picture

And what do you mean by “the Amazon thing?” Is it unethical or illegal to link to amazon without their consent? Perhaps you could simply list the references as APA, MLA, Chicago &c. style and leave the link fiasco out of the picture? Students can Google a book title.

Dan Gayle's picture

My favorite book is Dowding's Finer Points in the Spacing & Arrangement of Type

Nice site :)

William Berkson's picture

Another good manual is Mitchell and Wightman's Book Typography: A Designer's Manual
Here is the direct link for UK and Europe: http://www.libanuspress.co.uk/

In the US http://www.oakknoll.com/detail.php?d_booknr=92771&d_currency=

And I see you can get it cheaper used on Amazon.

J. Tillman's picture

I think every book should have the name of the author listed or mentioned in the description. Many books have no author referenced.

Chris Dean's picture

The typographic desk reference. Haven’t read it, but hear good things about it.

blank's picture

Is it unethical or illegal to link to amazon without their consent?

Nope.

Many books have no author referenced.

I really screwed the pooch on author names. It’s atop the list now. Thanks.

dezcom's picture

The typographic desk reference is very useful, I use it often like a dictionary. It is not something to be read cover to cover.

Justin_Ch's picture

I would recommend adding Lettering Design, by Michael Harvey, to the Lettering section.

There's a more recent Michael Harvey book called "Creative Lettering Today" which combines his earlier books in one volume and also covers digital drawing.

Mark Simonson's picture

Thanks, Justin. I didn't know about that one.

A new book, "Lettering, a reference manual of techniques" by Andrew Haslam, has just been published by Laurence King. The title is a bit of a misnomer since it's not just about "lettering", but virtually every known way of making letters, from drawing to typography to signmaking and even embroidery. Kind of like a DK book for designers with each technique summarized in a few pages.

Aaron Moodie's picture

Great resource, thanks. Just bought a few books from there.

Worth adding to the magazine list is Slanted. Best type mag out there IMO http://slanted.de

Chris Dean's picture

Now this is how you properly reference something. Below is a reference of a book chapter, English translation, reprinted from another source (according to APA 6):

————

Tschichold, J. (1991). Consistent correlation between book page and type area. (H. Hadler, Trans.). In R. Bringhurst (Eds.), The form of the book. Essays on the morality of good design (pp. 36–64). Washington, United States: Hartley & Marks Publishers Inc. (Reprinted from Aufsätze über Fragen der Gestalt des Buches und der Typographie, by J. Tschichold, Ed., 1975, Basil, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Verlag)

————

Never mind hyperlinking book titles.

a) they can suffer from link rot

b) if your reading list is set in a proper reference format and your students publish, they can simply copy and paste from your master list into their references section.

This is standard practice in (my circle of scientific) academia. In the printed publication the first line would be outdented, but I don’t know how to do that here without forced line breaks.

blank's picture

Complete academic citations would make a real mess out of the site. Putting that much information in turns it into a massive academic bibliography, which is not an easy thing to browse. To make it work I would really need to use a more powerful CMS system that could store each book as a database entry and offer detailed information when requested. I am already planning to do this just to make adding images, sorting, etc. possible, but only if there is enough interest from users. I am actually surprised at the high level of interest; if it continues I might launch a kickstarter to pay for an overhaul.

I am also not interested in helping students copy/paste formatted citations; if they really looked something up they can prepare their own. If my experience with undergrads is any indication they need the practice!

Chris Dean's picture

…which is not an easy thing to browse.

I agree, the above example is very complex, but that’s probably as hard as it gets. For the most part, if it’s just a book, I think it would be simple for the lay-person to browse:

Bringhurst, R. (2005). The elements of typographic style. Hartley & Marks Publishers Inc. Washington DC, 
United States.

Authour, year, title, everything you need for a simple search. But I do agree, students need practice. It took me some time to get familiar with APA, and to date, there are many in my lab who do not know it fully. Not even the department chair knew how to do the complex example I showed previously. But then again, I guess they don’t need to. That’s what they pay RAs for.

A well coded (tagged) database would be a wonderfully useful tool. Once the structure is in place, you simply need to add to it as you go. It takes time, but after 2-3 years, you’d be surprised ah what you can end up with. I can’t imagine what would happen with an open-source approach. I would recommend starting with a spreadsheet. Depending on the context, I use this for article reviews which helps other authours contribute.

Paying someone to develop a custom fillable form to populate a database may well be worth it.

Richard Fink's picture

@christopher
>This is standard practice in (my circle of scientific) academia. In the printed >publication the first line would be outdented, but I don’t know how to do that here >without forced line breaks.

You mean hanging indents, I suppose. (APA) It isn't the top line that's outdented it's everything else that is indented. that is, as far as I'm aware, the left margin stays the same as the body of the paper.

Here's a shot at doing it in a comment:

Tschichold, J. (1991). Consistent correlation between book page and type area. (H.
  Hadler, Trans.). In R. Bringhurst (Eds.), The form of the book. Essays on the
  morality of good design (pp. 36–64). Washington, United States: Hartley
  & Marks Publishers Inc.(Reprinted from Aufsätze über Fragen der
  & Gestalt des Buches und der Typographie, by J.Tschichold, Ed., 1975,
  Basil, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Verlag

Richard Fink's picture

And it's a pain in the ass.

dezcom's picture

Can't you just write: "Tschichold@google.com?

Chris Dean's picture

@Richard: What you described is what I was trying to describe. I’ve always (erroneously) called it “outdented” for some reason. Is there a formatting feature on Typophile to do that or did you do it manually? And it’s not a pain at all really. Even basic word-processing software like Pages can do it automatically.

Dan Gayle's picture

@James

A kickstarter would be cool, just for the experience of it. I'll volunteer any programming/html services you need.

William Berkson's picture

I don't think Christopher's suggestion here is advisable. One of the advantages of the internet is that you can keep things short and uncluttered, and use hyperlinks. Keeping it simple and clean is paramount, and I think James is on the right track.

—By the way, James, on the question of simplicity, the (author) after each author's name is overkill. All you need is the names on a separate line, especially if it's in a different font, as here. At most "by" at the beginning...

Chris Dean's picture

But again, links can rot. Text can’t. A broken link without the necessary information to search just in case is useless. An important consideration if you want a resource with longevity.

blank's picture

Dan, I might take you up on that offer later. But I have another font release to deal right now.

William, I added the (Author) credit because there are also editors and directors on some projects. I might drop it anyway.

Richard Fink's picture

@chris

1) Keep the lines short enough so they don't re-wrap no matter what the zoom level is and whatnot.

2) I used two consecutive em spaces to get the indent on each line.

I don't know why, but Word always screws up the formatting on my wife's APA style papers. As resident support guy, I have to fix manually.

@dezcom

I agree. We should all be given google email accounts just like we have social security numbers. At birth. Even dead people should get one posthumously.
Google is working on the delivery issues, I hear. And we should be able to send email to our dear departed ones by the end of the year.

Chris Dean's picture

@Richard: Re “Keep the lines short enough so they don't re-wrap no matter what the zoom level is and whatnot.”

I’m not sure I follow. Are you speaking of how my “Literature” section on Read the type functions? I am by no means a web designer so any input you have would be appreciated. Personally, I like my text big so I always find myself zooming in and I prefer it to wrap as opposed to giving me a horizontal scroll (as it does on useit.com for example. Anyone know how to do this in WordPress?

dezcom's picture

"...we should be able to send email to our dear departed ones by the end of the year."

Just in time for New Year messages ;-)

Richard Fink's picture

@christopher

No. I meant getting the hanging indent to stay put without any unwanted line breaks.
Gotta leave some empty space between the last letter of the line and the right hand margin.
But this is only necessary in a text box. In a word processor, once the indent is set, it should just reflow. Making any sense?

Unrelated to your link list. Quite excellent, BTW. Bookmarked.

I like Dunwich's too.

Richard Fink's picture

@dezcom

I'm sure it's already been done with snail-mail, but the premise of getting a whole bunch of email replies from a bunch of famous dead people could be pretty funny.

I wonder what rnixon@google.com would write back to me. Hah!

Nick Shinn's picture

Some Typophile contributors have died, and it's strange to read old threads in which they participate—with my avatar (and those of others) updated.

blank's picture

One reason I stopped using Facebook was that it kept sending messages about Gerald Giampa after he died. Creepy thing, Facebook.

speter's picture

LinkedIn *still* suggests I connect with Doyald Young.

dezcom's picture

Linkedin never reads obits.

kentlew's picture

> LinkedIn *still* suggests I connect with Doyald Young.

That seems like a very sinister thing to do. Or perhaps just occult.

Richard Fink's picture

séance.com

wonder if the domain name is taken...... probably

Syndicate content Syndicate content