traditional hangul typography

andrej trilavov's picture

hi,

I'm having problems with identifying traditional hangul (korean writing system) orthography (3 glyphs right on the picture).

From what I understand, left on the picture are 3 modern hangul sans serifs meaning 'kuk sul do', and on the right is some sort of a traditional hangul writing system which is totally unfamiliar to me. I was told it means 'kuk sul do', too. So, basically I would need precise information how is this orthography called.

So if there is a korean ninja somewhere around, help would be much appreciated. :)

Thanks!

lunde's picture

Yeah, what he said.

billtkd's picture

Both of them do say 'Kuk Sul Do'. On the left it is in Hangul (Korean letters) and on the right, Chinese characters. It means 'The Way of the National Art'. Wikipedia claims that it means 'National Korean Martial Art' but that would be 국립 한국어 무술 (Kuk Lip Han Kuk Uh Mu Sul). (Mu Sul means martial art. Han Kuk is Korea.)

(And no, I'm not a Korean ninja. There's no such thing, although I do practise taekwondo—태권도 or 跆拳道.)

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