OpenType feature support in web browsers

Ray Larabie's picture

I'd like to direct my customers to current information about which current browsers support OpenType features. I think class based kerning and default ligatures (liga) features are supported by some browsers but I'm not sure which ones. Is someone keeping score?

PabloImpallari's picture

Firefox does, others I don't know.

ralf h.'s picture

Safari and Chrome support the basic features in recent version.
Firefox as well and any OT features called with a -moz syntax: http://opentype.info/blog/2010/08/14/better-web-typography-with-opentype...
Depending on the browser and the font-size one might need to set:
text-rendering: optimizeLegibility;

Ray Larabie's picture

It sounds like Firefox's liga (standard ligatures) feature is on by default? Do Safari & Chrome have liga turned on by default?

Can anyone confirm the class based kerning works in either Chrome, Firefox or Safari?

ralf h.'s picture

It sounds like Firefox's liga (standard ligatures) feature is on by default?

It depends on the type size.

Do Safari & Chrome have liga turned on by default?

AFAIK not. But there are extensions for Safari and Chrome to set "rendering:optimizeLegibility" for every page automatically.

Can anyone confirm the class based kerning works in either Chrome, Firefox or Safari?

It is triggered the same way as the ligature support.

Ray Larabie's picture

Cheers!

Tosche's picture

HI, I'm looking for a list of features supported in web browsers, similar to the link below.
http://www.typotheque.com/fonts/opentype_feature_support

At least I'd like to know if the following features are supported in major browsers or not.
calt rlig isol init medi fina
(Sounds like Arabic, but it's Mongolian)

PabloImpallari's picture

Firefox has .liga tured on by default.
Nice :)

Now it seems that it also have .calt turned on by default?
Not nice :(

Anyone can confirm that .calt is ON by default?
Mmm... maybe it's nice :) if I rethink my programming

DTY's picture

Here's a link to a discussion about calt in Firefox:
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=463940

As explained there, implementation has been uneven (see also http://typophile.com/node/38209).

ralf h.'s picture

The point of the CALT feature is to improve the text display for certain letter combinations. So turning it on by default is the recommended behavior – in contrast to something as DLIG, SSxx and the like.

Khaled Hosny's picture

calt should be on by default, if your font is using it for a non-default substitution, then you are using the wrong feature tag (note, the substitution can still be contextual but under a different tag, e.g. dlig, this is very legitimate).

dlevine's picture

Is the ccmp feature available on any web browsers?

PabloImpallari's picture

By the way:
You can use this: http://www.impallari.com/testing/ to test open type features in web browser, and since the source code is available (here http://www.impallari.com/projects/overview/drag-and-drop-font-testing-page ) you can easily modify it to add more features for more complex testing

John Hudson's picture

'ccmp' is a default feature in most OTL shaping engines, so should be applied automatically, i.e. you don't need to specify it in CSS for browser use.

graceboy's picture

The most important factor some web browsers lag today is openType feature support in web browsers. The class based kerning and default Ligatures features are supported by Firefox and many other browsers and it was interesting to see the answers and opinions of different people
http://www.windows8helpnow.com

rdokoye's picture

Feature support in Firefox is always an issue and with the latest updates, which I've had a number of issues migrating over to, I'm not too keen on it as of now, I'd imagine Google Chrome (http://www.compuchenna.co.uk/google-chrome-is-slow/) would have broad support for it as of today.

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