Getting more informations about font catalogues

earthache's picture

Hi, I've recently started to work on my first thesis work.

It will be a historical research on typographic catalogues "from Guthenberg to www.ynotype.com", followed by the creation of a comprehensive font catalogue that will serve as the official font catalogue for the Fine Art Academy in Lecce, where I study.

The catalogue will comprehend a little taste of everything from serif to slab and sans, and the selection is supposed to help the students to get involved into typography, as well as to give them a basic palette of powerful and top-crafted types to work with.

So here I'm asking for help to find accurate historical infos about historically relevant font catalogues, i.e. the fonts owned by Guthenberg or Aldo Manuzio (just to give two examples of the first waves of font designers and printers), the font collections by Bodoni and/or other romanthic designers, the earliest font collections for Monotype and/or Lynotype etc.

I'm currently studying over and over Bringhurst books - the elements of style and the history of printed word, but I'm searching for more accurate and specific books.

Also deep insight on particular catalogues would be nice since this is a third-year thesis so I'll have a page limit and I can't write a proper book about the matter.

Thanks in advance for all the suggestions!

Peace
a.

oldnick's picture

Can't help with the old stuff, but this is the Bible on American type foundries...

http://www.oakknoll.com/detail.php?d_booknr=40614

earthache's picture

That sounds great.

I've found more infos about modern 'catalogues': Vignelli's 'few typefaces' (a very rude choice in my own opinion, but worth discussing) and Frutiger's complete typework.

I'd like to find more informations about Robert Slimbach's catalogue of fonts, and I'm struggling to find more infos about old type catalogues - e.g. Guthenberg's types and Francesco Griffo works for Aldo Manuzio (the only informations I've found up to now is that Griffo designed six romans and the first italic ever for Manuzio, that he was granted the sole use of the types, but nothing more).

Any more suggestions?

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