Now that's a logo!

hrant's picture

You can't do this with an alphabet:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3120229.stm

hhp

treacyfaces's picture

That's pretty interesting, the lettering under the symbol.

I've never dabbled in such lettering, the kind of stretching of a caricatured Chinese calligraphic brushstroke around the latin letterform.

Of course, there's been, at least during the latter part of the 20th century, a broad range of such type styles. Generally used for lower-class (for lack of better english at the moment) settings.

Such lettering has always struck me (as an omnicient observer) as a negative caricature. The way the old 'Charlie Chan' movie character seems to strike so many people today.

Can any Chinese here comment as to how that lettering concept (not its mediocre-looking execution) affects you?

Is it an acceptable caricature? Or is it just benign?

Is it appropriate for such a logo, regardless of who the logo might be targeted to?

Thanks!

Joe

hrant's picture

I think the much more interesting and relevant thing is that the logo is also a word. The lettering below is "just there" - it isn't the memorable component that will be "burned into people's consciousness" as the article says.

I guess it makes sense that a logography is better than an alphabet for logos!

hhp

treacyfaces's picture

>I think the much more interesting and
>relevant thing is that the logo is also a word.


That is fascinating. The kind of convergence that's very lucky in logo design.

Joe

eomine's picture

Joseph:
>Can any Chinese here comment as to how that
>lettering concept (not its mediocre-looking execution)
>affects you?

I'm not Chinese, but as Japanese writing systems are basically derived from Chinese, I think I can comment on this. :-)
Well, I don't appreciate the concept of Chinese brushstroke style applied to Latin letterfoms. I think of it as a caricature too. The worst thing is that, very often, Chinese/Japanese people use this kind of lettering themselves. It's like "self-caricature"... :-/
This Beijing-2008 lettering is quite acceptable though. The execution, I mean.


Hrant:
>it makes sense that a logography is better than
>an alphabet for logos!

(?) It sounds so obvious that I think I'm not getting what you meant here. ;-)
Anyway, I don't like this Beijing-2008 logo. The lettering is better. I think the "metaphor" is too obvious here. There's no subtlety. The original Chinese ideogram is almost unrecognizable. And, in my humble opinion, it could be better executed.

hrant's picture

> "self-caricature"

Just like Latin handwriting fonts? :-)

> I think I'm not getting what you meant here.

Since an alphabet sequences phonetic codes to make a sound that's a word, the results aren't "elemental" in the way of a logography.

> The original Chinese ideogram is almost unrecognizable.

Is it possible that it's not a character used in Kanji (Chinese loan to Japanese), or maybe it looks different in Kanji? My computer bag has four Chinese characters on it, and I once asked a Chinese, a Japanese and a Korean person to read them to me. The Japanese and Korean only got 3 right.

Try your hand at it!

bag.gif

hhp

eomine's picture

>Just like Latin handwriting fonts? :-)

Ha! Good one! ;-)

>Is it possible that it's not a character used in Kanji (Chinese
>loan to Japanese), or maybe it looks different in Kanji?

Actually, the ideogram used there seems to be in the "ancient" style. AFAIK, it's not actually used anymore, in current language. Anyway, it's not that important, and it's not what bothers me most on that logo.

>The Japanese and Korean only got 3 right.

I assume they misread the 3rd one (top to bottom)?
It looks ambiguous to me.

>Try your hand at it!

1st: "ten"= heaven
2nd: "kan"= bureaucrat, government (according to the online dictionary, I think there are other meanings, but I can't remember right now)
3rd: ?
4th: "fuku"= fortune, luck

All of them in Japanese pronounciation.
Did I embarass myself, giving you all wrong answers? ;-)
Who drew those letters in your bag? What's the 3rd one?
Now I'm curious to know what it means (the whole word)!

hrant's picture

No, they got the second one wrong: they also read it as "bureaucrat" or "government official" or at best "important person". Or actually, maybe not totally wrong, but they failed to read the first two together as "heavenly being". The third is "gift". But I think you did pretty well overall! :-)

The Mandarin reading of it is something like "tin gao chou foo", which in English (or Chinglish) means "heavenly being give you gift of good fortune".

The letters aren't drawn, they're stitched onto the front of the bag - I got it from Bangkok's chinatown.

--

Now I'll wait for Keith to correct everything I just wrote! :-)

hhp

treacyfaces's picture

Eduardo Omine said

>The worst thing is that, very often,
>Chinese/Japanese people use this kind of
>lettering themselves.
>It's like "self-caricature"... :-/


That's what I was wondering, exactly.



>This Beijing-2008 lettering is quite
>acceptable though. The execution, I mean.


Ok. Thanks for your insight!

Joe

eomine's picture

>failed to read the first two together as "heavenly being".

Hmm. I knew that "kan" kanji was tricky. ;-)
Now I wonder if Chinese people read (or attempt to read) Japanese better than Japanese people read Chinese...

And, can you get me a bigger image of that "gift" kanji?
Send me in private if you prefer.

hrant's picture

I don't think Chinese people can read any [non-Kanji] Japanese.

--

gift.gif

hhp

eomine's picture

You're probably right, but Japanese people can't actually read Chinese either. We can just suppose some things.

And thank you very much for the image! :-)

hrant's picture

Jared, I remember that!
That font of yours was one of the very first -and coolest- things on Typophile.

And "HRANT" is coming out OK, I think. BTW, you know what's really cool? Some guy once told me that my name kinda sounds like "black dragon" in Mandarin.

hhp

hrant's picture

> zeal

You mean "seal", right?

> Everything about this identity is clich

rcapeto's picture

Jared, that

hrant's picture

It's true, I let my enthusiasm for a great concept* cause me to assume good things about the overall. I accept that the execution seems very clich

eomine's picture

>But it looks wrong somehow...

Yes, it should have three "legs".

>Paul Haeberli

karen's picture

The idea, in the hands of a better designer, might've worked. But in this case the execution is just really amateurish.

They might have gotten away with it if they had done the red part better, but there is no way in hell they could've gotten away with the chop suey lettering.

I always thought it was only the non-Chinese who would use such Chinese take-out font in association with all things Oriental (Chinese, Japanese, Asian, etc) I had always put it down to a lack of understanding of the Chinese culture on the part of the designers.

But as I come across more of such designs done by Chinese themselves or commissioned by Chinese, I think it has less to do with understanding the Chinese culture than understanding design.

> Can any Chinese here comment as to how that lettering concept (not its mediocre-looking execution) affects you?
I cringe.

> Is it an acceptable caricature? Or is it just benign?
I think it's unacceptable. But seeing that the "clients" are Chinese themselves...

It can't say it's the brush strokes that broke the lettering, and made it a caricature. Because I have here a good example of brush stroke lettering. Also used for a Chinese-related subject.

hrant's picture

> done by Chinese themselves

Yeah, that's the saddest, and it happens all the time, especially these days.

And to give a great historical example: in the 1970s the Greeks themselves were mostly responsible for the bastardization of their own script. The good news is that there's a strong correction going on now.

hhp

karen's picture

Looks like it's a huge step backwards from the logo they used in their bid.

kakaze's picture

Woah, I like that loopy thing a lot better than the logogramme they picked. It is a step backwards :sigh: Decision by committee sucks.

aeolist's picture

i think the red seal thingy is decent, but the lettering just plainly sucks. reminds me of some horrible chinese restaurants' logos and cheap online freefonts. the bid thing is so much better. Anyway, it seems that ppl designing for the olympics tend to use "traditional" elements of the country's culture and stuff
see for example the one for the olympics next year
http://www.2004.gr/Templates/5615/IMG0.gif

i think it's good, not anything special, but yet good.. thank god they didnt use some ancient looking greek font.
what really sucks is the mascot selection - these are supposed to look like dols made around 700 b.c.
(they are in the top right
http://www.2004.gr/files/aboutathens2004/pins.jpg
http://www.neolaia.de/2opseis/DaneiaeeU/periodiko10/Iaoeuo_2004/foibos.jpg

oh, and also we should be really happy that the olympics are returning to their country of birth, getting rid of all that commercialisation:
http://www.2004.gr/page/default.asp?la=2&id=2025
good god, they even sell toilet paper and boxer shorts with those 2 silly things on them

the olympic torch has to be the best designed item, the industrial designer who made this was inspired by the olive's leaves
http://www.2004.gr/page/default.asp?id=9143&la=2
-------------
when i first read hrant's post, about the "bastardisation of greek language", i didnt really understand what he meant (i am greek btw, or hellenic if you prefer the term)
i saw the light a few minutes later, you are probably speaking about the change in our language. We moved from the polytonical(many tones) to the monitonical(one tone) system in the 1970's. Let me give a lecture.

After the greek revolution in 1821, the newly founded country had to determine it's ethnicity. So, apart from the religion (orthodox), they came up with a language that was neither like ancient greek, nor like the one ppl were speaking back then, but a pompous mix of both. This mixture was named "katharevousa" ("pure/clean/clear language") and it was declared official language of Greece. Now, ancient greeks only had uppercase letters and had no problems in pronounciation (they knew it by heart)(first texts in greek are dated around 1200 b.c.). However, after alexander the great (who conquered, in today's terms, pretty much the whole of greece, egypt, turkey, iraq, iran and went all the way to india and that was around 320 b.c.), the language had to be simplified. I think they started developing lowercase around then too. Anyway, to ensure that everybody got the pronounciation right, they made 3 different tones and 2 other symbols (the exact translation would be spirits - nothing to do with demonology though)
One tone to signify that you had to heighten your voice in that syllable, another meant that you had to lower your voice, a third meant that the toned vowel had to be pronounced twice.
The other 2 symbols had to do with the pronounciation of the first letter, if there would be a thick or thin sound of an "h" to it ("hercules", "hypnopaedia", "hellas" and many other h- words are taken from greek and the special "spirit" for a thick "h" sound has been replaced by the "h" letter). These symbols also had a use in spelling correctly when creating compound words.
However, all this signs no longer serve a cause, because the ancient way of pronouncing has been long forgotten (even the byzantines didnt know it)... They only served as a helping hand (or not?) in learning and spelling correctly. The whole katharevousa thing created a gap between simple folks and writers/official texts etc.(they didnt understand it). They thought that the only way to enrich the current language was to fill it with unusable ancient terms - big mistake. It was like you had to use 2 different languages, one for everyday speaking and the other for writing officially. It was replaced by modern greek once the army dictatorship was over, in 1975. Ever since the official language is "modern" greek, which has no "spirits" and only one tone, that shows which syllable has to be heightened. Oh, and we still use a lot of ancient words "as is", without having to use the weird forms of "katharevousa". So i really don't know what that "correction process" you are talking about is.

aeolist's picture

a couple of notes: The alphabet has stayed the same ever since ancient times. The same 24 letters are being used today.
And for the sake of our ethnicity, plz use the term hellenic rather than greek

hellenic and greek are both names of males mentioned in ancient greek mythology. They are both sons of Deykallion and (cant remember her name), the only couple who survived the flood Zeus created to destroy mankind. However "greek" was used during the turkish period of slavery (1453-1821 roughly) and "hellenic" is the official name now accepted

greek is not wrong, just out of date and tact

hrant's picture

> bastardisation of greek language

Actually, I was talking about the script, not the language - the way it started looking very Western/Latin especially in the 70s - but now there seems to be a correction going on.

I know even less about the Greek language than its script - which is why I appreciated the mini lesson! Thanks.

> plz use the term hellenic rather than greek

That's gonna be a tough one...

hhp

aluminum's picture

Wow! That bid logo is wonderful. I wonder if the olympic committee shut it down (maybe resembling the official olympics logo too much?)

aluminum's picture

Wow! That bid logo is wonderful. I wonder if the olympic committee shut it down (maybe resembling the official olympics logo too much?)

aeolist's picture

hehe, now that i re-read my humongous post, it was like i was bitching, i had no intention to do that

plz tell me where you heard that info from

in the age of globalisation pretty much all languages are taking in words and phrases from foreign languages such as english or french in our case
writing greek in latin characters might have been a hip for some lame restaurants to attract tourists. nowadays that script change is needed on the net. greek ppl in chat rooms write greek in latin characters to ensure that their messages is read (incompatibility issues, lack of fonts etc)
that new way of writing is called "greeklish" ("greek-solution" i think it means, although the orthography is wrong) unfortunately there are many spelling issues when writing in greeklish - the letters are different, sound different etc
for example we have three letters that sound like "i" (they kinda look like i,h,y) however many a times they do get replaced by just "i", so the language really loses it's richness

hrant's picture

Well, that's interesting too :-) but I'm talking about the normal Greek/Hellenic alphabet becoming more Latinized, for example by acquiring too many serifs.

http://www.themicrofoundry.com/ss_rome3.html

hhp

aeolist's picture

ok man, i quickly went through this article of sorts, it just talks about the ancient way of writing the caps changing to more fixed characters after the romans conquered "our lands". this is really true, but has nothing to do with today's world :-)
Anyway, you know, the greek alphabet is like the latin's alphabet dad. Greeks copied most of Phoenicians' letters back in 1500 - 1300 b.c. or something (adding a lot of characters, especially vowels - the phoenicians had none), and then the romans adapted a special form of the greek alphabet which was used in north greece i think, and naturally added some characters, making the arithmetic difference... 24 letters in greek, 26 in latin.

(just to clear something up, the phoenicians were an ancient tribe of traders. they lived around Israel-Palestine-Jordania)

i think i'll stop being a history teacher right now...

John Hudson's picture

Perhaps we need a new Greek type thread?

The change in fashion of Greek type design to which Hrant refers is not intrinsically related to either the change from polytonic to monotonic (never complete) or the longer history of language change. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Greek graphic designers and publishers wanted types that were 'modern' and which looked as much as possible like the popular Latin types of the time. Linotype, who had a virtual monopoly on typesetting systems in Greece, duly provided Greek designs of bestselling families like Helvetica, Baskerville and New Century Schoolbook. In all these designs, drawn by Matthew Carter, a deliberate effort was made to introduce as many Latin forms as possible, and to attach serifs wherever possible (Matthew jokes that he was surprised the Greek clients didn't ask for serifs on Helvetica). The proportions of the letters in these designs derive directly from the Latin (themselves constrained by the unit measurements of previous typesetting systems), rather than being tailored to the Greek alphabet and the frequency of letter combinations in typical Greek texts. Wherever possible, Greek letters were formed simply by adding to, subtracting from or rotating Latin forms; the Helvetica Greek lowercase sigma, for example, is simply a latin o with a stick coming out the side. To be fair to Matthew and his colleagues at Linotype, who now acknowledge that these designs are neither attractive in themselves nor authentically Greek, it is necessary to state again that this is what the Greek market wanted.

In 2001, when Linotype asked me to work with them to develop a large 'core font' version of Helvetica supporting multiple scripts. I suggested that we redesign the Cyrillic and Greek from scratch, rather than using Matthew's 1970s version. Linotype deserve a round of applause for agreeing to this and paying for the design of a new, more authentic Greek rather than using what they already had. It's still Helvetica, of course, so there is only so much one can do in the way of beauty and readability, but I think this comparison illustrates the difference in approach to Greek type design as it has changed over the past thirty years:
Helvetica Greeks

hrant's picture

Great summary!
And equally great visual comparison between the old Helvetica-Greek and yours. Good going on the "redesign", taking advantage of the fact that Greeks are a lot less confused now about what makes good type.

> a deliberate effort was made to introduce as many Latin forms as possible

But fortunately they didn't go as far as Jan van Krimpen (bottom row):

grklapid.gif

That was just plain nuts.

--

In trying to figure out why some of the most talented Latin designers make the worst non-Latin fonts, I've arrived at the theory that pride in one's own culture motivates creativity in it, but even if it's justified it inhibits good design in other cultures.

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

John, compared with the Carter version, yours has a number of slightly curved stems where he had straight ones: but not consistently.

For instance, both pi and upsilon have straight vertical stems in the Carter version, but in yours the pi has straight legs, but the upsilon is quite curved. What principle are you using to determine whether stems are straight or curved?

hrant's picture

> not consistently

With respect to what, though?

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

> >not consistently

>With respect to what, though?

I'm just comparing the two shown above. (Neither of which is like the version I'm familiar with from school days, Times, which is "italic".)

I realize that the Hudson version is not a "redo" of the Carter. I'm just interested in the design logic.

aeolist's picture

i guess even today's greek designers are not at all font-wise, probably because you can't get any "official" education on this. You can only attend classes at small inefficient private colleges, for a couple of years. (There are only public universities in Greece)

i dont find the carter version so far from reality or horrible or anything. i am not sure if your newer version is more "authentic". I would say it is a thousand times better executioned and very attractive. however, in essence, the lc sigma is an o with a stick.

i also notice that you are featuring second (kinda unofficial and calligraphic) ways or writing certain letters, theta and fi.
there are alternatives to sigma and pi as well, i can post a couple of images if anybody's interesting

ah, this is just great, i just remembered i have a small book on greek typography, 1499-1999... gonna get back with interesting images

hrant's picture

> the lc sigma is an o with a stick

Why?

hhp

John Hudson's picture

however, in essence, the lc sigma is an o with a stick.

I completely disagree. The sigma is a single stroke without reversal: this is obvious if you look at Greek handwriting and at any of the Greek types prior to the 20th century.

John Hudson's picture

i also notice that you are featuring second (kinda unofficial and calligraphic) ways or writing certain letters, theta and fi.
there are alternatives to sigma and pi as well...


I did draw a scribal pi for the Helvetica Linotype font, but I don't like it so left it out of the specimen. This is a difficult form to make convincing in this style of type. I did not make a lunate sigma.

John Hudson's picture

Nick wrote: For instance, both pi and upsilon have straight vertical stems in the Carter version, but in yours the pi has straight legs, but the upsilon is quite curved. What principle are you using to determine whether stems are straight or curved?

Do you mean pi or psi? I'm guessing the latter.

It came down to a question of what works: the upsilon desperately needs the entry stroke and the curved right side. I could have carried this over to the psi, but I didn't want the whole design becoming too cursive: I wanted to maintain some of the rigidity that is a hallmark of Helvetica. The psi works okay with the straight sides, and is a much less common letter than upsilon, so I think it can afford to carry the rigidity.

hrant's picture

> The sigma is a single stroke

While I would say that the sigma is a sigma, and not any other letter. So the further it is from other letters (and not necessarily just those in its own alphabet) the better - as long as the requirements of decipherability and "belonging" are adequately met.

The most important parts of a letter are its acrocratic features. Often there are things other letters don't have - in the case of the sigma, its horizontal protrusion. So you could say that the sigma is a stick with a "o" coming out of it! :-)

But ideally you want to reduce the "o"-ness of its "o", maybe even by breaking it.

hhp

aeolist's picture

i went through my book. unfortunately it didnt have much info.
In the 15th-18th century most greek fonts were based on calligraphy and handwriting. From the beginning of the 19th century until today there have been some unique greek fonts, many feature serifs and remind us of byzantine writing. In the 50's most typographers used linotype, in the 60's it was monotype and in the 70's it was offset and phototypesetting.
here are a couple of pics

01
02
03

first one is self-explanatory i guess
second one was printed 1952, it's from the textbook of first grade - elementary school (they kept that book intact for 20-25 years)
last one is my silly handwritting, just pointing out alternative ways of drawing some of the letters

about the sigma sign, most ppl use the alternative way of drawing it, as it shows in 03.gif above. The sigma is for sure one stroked without reversal , and the way to draw it is to start making the circle from the highest point at the top and when you finish it to draw the horizontal line, all in one stroke (if you start by making the line first, you'll eventually end up making the alternative version). What i meant by that "in essence the sigma is an o with a line coming out of it" is that geometrically, that's what distinguishes it from the rest of the letters. How do you know that the shape you are looking at is in fact a sigma?

hrant's picture

> How do you know that the shape you are looking at is in fact a sigma?

1) You never know 100%.
2) It has the right acrocratic features.

hhp

kakaze's picture

Which one is the Sigma?

aeolist's picture

sigma is the fourth from the top

kakaze's picture

It's the one that looks like a cursive "o" then? You can make it look like a "G" and it's still the same letter?

aeolist's picture

yeah, it's the same thing if it looks like a G-6 or something
which for me raises the question, how we know which letter is which, even if it doesnt have the same acrocratic features (i guess that's the basic shapes it's composed to, for this one a line and a circle)
in this particular case, you will only understand it's the same letter if you try handwritting it both wsys, as i explained in a prior post i think (trying to do the same shape, but starting from a different point)

hrant's picture

A tidbit from the current Icograda newsletter:

"
Morisawa Font
By Shinnoske Sugisaki, JAGDA, Japan

A poster for a well known font foundry in Japan 'Morisawa.' Innumerable Chinese characters are enumerated in order to express the numerousness
of the character set. In Japan, more than 3000 Chinese characters (ideogram) called Kanji are used together with Japanese characters
(phonogram) called Kana.

More than 1.5 billion people in the world use Chinese characters with the same meanings but with different pronunciations. This design is
transformed three-dimensionally to express today's advanced technology of fonts used in computers and the Internet.

Please view in Galeria > http://www.icograda.org/web/galeria-current.shtml
"

hhp

eomine's picture

Honestly, I didn't like this poster.
I am tired of full-color-gradients and 3d-lens-effects.

But thanks for the link, there are some interesting stuff there.
This one is a nicer one, in my humble opinion.

Stephen Coles's picture

Yakuza is featured in Interrobang, a SOTA Journal that
debuted at TypeCon2003. I think this is yet another sign
that you should finish up the font for release, Jared.

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