Corporate Identity for Visual Communications Company

steez's picture

Proposed Corporate Mark
Hey all. I'm in the process of developing an identity for a visual communications company. Its decided name is 'LI' which is an abbr. of Lindborg. I've chosen to stick to a typographical sollution for the logo, but I'm open for suggestions. Any feedback is welcome.

Cheers!

dana's picture

Opinion: The geometry and form are pleasing to my eye

mystic's picture

Be cautious on changing your name to LI. LI Can be any number of things and it may have been your full name that made you easy to remember.

dan's picture

Two thoughts One: I don't get the square before the LI and Two shouldn't communication be communications You are going to do more than one project I hope

steez's picture

v.02
Greatful for all that info! Cheers! It sure will be 'Communications'. Just a small mistake. Thanks for pointing it out tho.

I've tweaked it a bit, making the I lowercase. I feels it makes it a bit more playful, and hopefully it will make it less corporate, I want to express/communicate 'playfulness' through the use of typography. Does it work? I feel the letter almost become 'figure-like'. Does it need balancing?

S.

steez's picture

You have a point with the .li as an extension of a website hosted in Lithuania, or Liechtenstein actually! Don't know if it is a bad thing really? Is it? At what point does a client need to know the rationele behind a corporate mark? Do they?
Even if a spectator makes a connection with, say Liechtenstein, would there be any negative connotations affecting the way they see the logo?

S.

steez's picture

Tried an outlined version, and also changed from helvetica neue to DIN Schrift 1451 Engschrift. Sits nicer I think, also helvetica is just being murdered out there with so many vis.com businesses using it.. Suggestions anyone?

Cheers!



S.

dana's picture

Some observations/questions

steez's picture

Hi Dana,

Thanx for that feedback! I've now adjusted the dot to line up with the 'L' horizontal stroke. I also had to add 'IT Strategy' to the tag-line. Not sure to go for lower or uppercase tho. Suggestions? I've also introduced a bit of colour! At the moment 100% cyan, but I'm leaning more towards a light 'corporate' blue.

At the moment I'm most happy with the top, second from the left. You? Or anyone for that matter?

Cheers,

S.

Variations of .LI Corporate Mark

dan's picture

Sebastian, I was fine with your direction until you added: & IT Strategy. Why don't you also say: & We take out the trash. You might do IT Strategy but if Visual Communications is the core business drop the & IT Strategy, its just an add on. Plus visually the tagline disappears. I see you tried to compensate in a couple of versions by spacing out .Li, that doesn't work for me, it starts to fall apart.

speter's picture

The visual identity seems to be turning IT on its head, quite literally.

dana's picture

Observation

steez's picture

Hey all. Thanx again for all the feedback. In terms of the extended tagline, it wasn't my choice people! However, I will try to talk 'them' out of it. I also decided to go back to helvetica neue, condensed black. I feel that the other faces weren't quite bold enough against the 'chunky' '.LI'. Suggestions of a suitable typeface anyone? I've now narrowed it down to four versions. I'm still having a hard time deciding on outlined or not? Also, do you guys have any suggestions on the distance between the baseline of 'LI' and the tagline? Should it be based on the distance between the elements of 'LI'? (it currently is) I'm still working on the corporate colours, will get back to you on that one...

Cheers,

S.

final four

mystic's picture

As for the distance, scale it down so that it's about 50 pixels tall. if you can't read Visual Communications, adjust the size ratio between the logotype and the tagline as well as the spacing between the two. The reason you want to do this is because the entire logo usually takes up 50 pixels with about 7 pixels white padding around the logo, usually being 65 pixels total on the web. Of course, this depends on the design of the website, but this is very common and you want it to be readable at low resolutions as well as very high resolutions (like 1280 x 1024). I think you want to avoid using different ratios for print and web.

mystic's picture

As you can see, the tagline is not very visible at low resolutions, which is not appropriate for websites (see all major corporate websites of all industries for verification of this concern).

You also cannot read the tagline from far away. If the tagline is important for the business, which most are, it should be somewhat visible. In many cases for new brands, the tagline is as important than the logo/logotype is seeing as people have not made the connection that ".LI" symbol means "visual communications".



Again, you still might want to consider why you are using ".li". Maybe it's because your client/management says so, but I think it's a bad idea in a lot of ways. Acronyms and shortforms usually made it harder for people to remember the brand. People will not say "Lee" or "Lie" communications when they talk about the brand. They just won't know what to call you and it'll be extra hard for people to make the connection with your old name (if they know it) and new people will be clueless. Don't pick a shortform just because IBM and others have one.

steez's picture

Hi Ken,

I've taken the reduction issues you mentioned (Cheers!) in consideration and when mocking up the website I actually wouldn't reduce it to the extent you did. I found the tagline to be fully visible. This goes for the business card and letterhead as well. I will post some photos soon to give an idea, and for feedback of course!

As for the name, I was to some extent given a relatively open brief, with lots of creative freedom, but this business will be to some extent be sub branded through another existing IT firm lacking the services we will offer, so I

mystic's picture

If you make it bigger than 65 pixels, it'll look huge at 800x600. This is why most sites never cross that pixel barrier.

I still think you should have Lindborg in the name. I'm basically assuming that "LI" is the logo, not the name and that Lindborg should be somewhere.

I think the mark itself is fine. It gives the impression you want. But a logo that is memorable is nothing if people don't have something to associate it with, i.e. a name. There are very few brands that rely on the mark alone and it takes billions of dollars to make sure people know it. For an abstract company like yours, you almost have to have the name in the logo. If I started to call my company Upfactor as "UF" and used the same logo, that would confuse a lot of people. It doesn't make a lot of sense since Upfactor is short enough and an identifiable name on its own. In a way, I'd be making the brand worse by cutting it down. I think you're doing the same thing.

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