Oxford English Dictionary Website Serif Font

HalosGhost's picture

Hey everyone!

It's been a while since my last post, but I've become very intrigued in this typeface. Now attending college, the OED has become one of my greatest tools, and the typeface used for the header in each entry ("definition, n." below in red) is gorgeous. If I'm not mistaken, the serifed text in the definitions are also of the same family.

Though, I have to say, without the "fi" ligature, this particular example is not so pretty.

Any and all help is greatly appreciated as always!

Joshua Langman's picture

It looks like Georgia.

HalosGhost's picture

I see some similarities, but the "d", the "f", the "i",the serifs on the "n", and the "," all appear to be different to me.

I'm really focusing on the Red text, though the other serifs may be the same, the red text is what's most important to me.

-Sam

[Edit] In looking at the stylesheets used by the definition pages on oed.com, I found "font-family:Georgia, Times, 'Times New Roman'". This could very well mean I was wrong and Georgia is the correct font, but I have to say, I still feel like there is a lot of difference. Perhaps the rendering on my computer is just weird?[/Edit]

Number3Pencils's picture

It's definitely Georgia. I guess there's some rendering weirdness somewhere, but I recognized it as Georgia as soon as I saw it, and the stylesheet confirms that. The other fonts are also Georgia (some of them bold or italic), except for the IPA in Lucida Sans Unicode and "View as..." in Arial.

HalosGhost's picture

Alright, no worries. Thanks for the help guys. What was really throwing me off was whether or not the serifs were flat horizontals, or at a diagonal. Every sample of Georgia I looked at had them different than the example from the site, but that could very easily just be my screen.

Thanks again for the help!

-Sam

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