r&r hourglasses

cpix's picture

Here is a new logo I made for a fake hourglass company as practice. I would appreciate any critique at all. Thanks.

riccard0's picture

It’s clean and effective.
Two observations: the Rs and & don’t match in regard of style: the & has an Art Nouveau feel that the Rs lack.
Also, you should align the bottom flat terminal of the & to the one of the R.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

And the & appears to have some bumpy curves: not quite curve, not quite corner at some places.

Arno Enslin's picture

I am not sure, but shall the ampersand represent an hourglass? If so, would expect, that the counters have the same size.

cpix's picture

Thanks for the critiques. As for the bumpy curves, it's probably because I haven't finalized the ampersand design yet. I am planning to smooth it out a bit more. Also, I'm on a search to find a better font for the Rs. I will work on the stuff you guys mentioned and try to come up with something better.

cpix's picture

After trying a search for a new typeface for the R's, I tried playing around w/ the serifs of the existing R's and came up with something that I feel better harmonizes w/ the ampersand.

I also aligned the bottoms of the Rs and the ampersand.

The ampersand still might have some slight irregularities but I'm planning on fixing everything when I vectorize it.

Also, Arno, do you mean the counters of the R's should have the same amount of space as the space in the bottom portion of the ampersand/hourglass? I feel they are quite similar unless you are referring to something else?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I have a beautiful cover of Isaac Bashevis Singers The Family Moskat which uses an ornate art noveau-ish typeface that reminds me of your ampersand, but I can't seem to find a digital version of this exact version. On a side note: That is one amazing book!

cerulean's picture

I believe Arno means, and I agree, that the top and bottom parts of the & should be closer to the same size in keeping with the common properties of an hourglass.

Arno Enslin's picture

I believe Arno means, and I agree, that the top and bottom parts of the & should be closer to the same size in keeping with the common properties of an hourglass.

Yes, that’s, what I meant.

And in the actual example I would say, that the first R should be dragged slightly (one or two pixel) to left.

You also could try to horizontal mirror the left R, drop the ampersand and creating an hourglass in the negative shape between the R and the mirrored R. I mean, this cries for symmetry.

Syndicate content Syndicate content