Logo Feedback: Looking for open critique.

zerimar3's picture

Hello. I've been working on some logo concepts and posted it on Logopond for some feedback. However, I'd like a bit more feedback on how things are going.

I'm not a logo designer but I mainly do layouts for final production. I would like to feature some of my work online or have a portfolio put together. I would really appreciate any feedback that can be offered in critiquing the concepts to build some type of direction.

My original intention is to keep the logo fun, youthful, and able to reach several areas of business rather than look to industrial. The name is Baselight Creative. I'm hoping to form a small agency in the near future. Thank you for your time, I look forward to reading replies and I'll post any updates/revisions here.

Feel free to view the logo in question at the following link, this is my first try so I thank you for your patience and time Baselight Creative

Thanks!

ophello's picture

The first example won me over (top left). It's simple, no frills, clear, effective. The mark you've created does not need any adornment, circles, etc. It stands perfectly well on its own. All the other treatments detract from its simplicity.

I'd look at experimenting with the letter spacing amount on that example -- it looks a little too open to me.

I might mention this: it looks like a fist holding a light bulb. I really like the effect (someone's grabbed an idea and is thrusting it towards me.) If that isn't what you're going for, I'd make the spiral effect of the bulb look less like a little cartoon hand. :D

None of your other examples quite do it for me -- they seem like weaker, divergent derivatives of the catchyness, clarity and energy of example 1.

Also, I kind of prefer the typeface you've evolved into on the bottom. The mark, however, became stale and mechanical and lacks the character of example 1. I'm not convinced that the "CB" needs to be tilted...i think thats about all I can think of.

zerimar3's picture

ophello, thank you for your comments, I highly appreciate your thoughts. I didn't look at the bulb in the first set as a fist throwing an idea. That really stands out. I was, initially, looking to go for something fun but the more I looked at it the more cartoonish it became. The whole bulb started out with trying to combine the letters B,L, and C together.

I think my sketches are a lot sharper but due to my limitations in Illustrator came out a bit more cartoonish. I think I'll take some time to mold it more and use the typeface from the bottom logo. You're right, I don't think the CB needs to be tilted. I'll put up a revision soon. Thank you again for your time and suggestions.

zerimar3's picture

ophello, I've put them side and having taken your suggestions. Thoughts? Thank you.

ophello's picture

The question really comes down to this: is Baselight Creative a fun, energetic powerhouse or a serious, sophisticated, engineering firm?

These two examples convey very different emotions.

I understand the intellectual need you feel to cleverly combine the CB and L into one single form (I don't see the "L" yet). But you also have to ask if that kind of communication is appropriate for your client. Aside from that, the letter monogram says "CB" which is, of course, out of order...though that may not matter.

I really know nothing about this company so take my comments lightly -- it's really your call. I'm sure the client will feel which of these directions is best.

Overall, I'd say you've converged towards two very strong solutions. I have nothing more to add with regard to your typeface choice -- it works for me.

I forgot to mention: your abstract treatment (the dot rays in blue and yellow) caught my eye but it didn't stand out enough. Don't discard that one. I think a more abstract concept might work. You have two very literal translations of "baselight" but a third more abstract idea may be the answer. I'd play with that one as well.

I was just thinking...the example on the right only shows us the screw part of the bulb. what if it has some more fire and energy that the left one had?

zerimar3's picture

Thank you for your comments once again. This is a personal project for a business venture I'm looking to go in. As I stated in my first post, I don't do logo designs, primarily layouts and some work in photoshop for photos. I layout brochures, catalogs and such but primarily work in brand packaging. Most work is turned over to me just to lay it.

However, I've wanted to post some of my work online and possibly do a bit of freelancing, therefore I felt a logo would be best for an online portfolio and a mark for trade shows.

The first questions you've asked are ones I've asked myself. I would like to keep it youthful, fun, and energetic with some longevity. I would like to be able to have a logo that adapts to say, the auto industry as well as the food industry, education, and so on. A very broad logo.

When I think of a light bulb or fixture I do not want people to think we're a lighting or electrical company. This is why I threw in the logo with the dot rays (in blue and yellow). I wanted to go with a more abstract feel and something that did not relate to the word "baselight" but kept it very open.

I would like to keep working on the dot ray logo and haven't discarded it because it is abstract but may need a different treatment. Regarding the "L" you don't see, it's in the more cartoonish logo on the screw part. It's a small "L" connected to the "B" without the spine.

You are right in that the logo to the right shows a CB backwards but I don't mind it too much. Let me know of any other suggestions you may have regarding the dot ray logo. I'm interested in hearing them. Right now I'd like to just get as much feedback as possible from as many people, since this is my first shot at a logo design.

Thank you.

ophello's picture

I don't think that either of these examples could possibly be confused for a lightbulb company for two major reasons that I can think of:

1. i don't think any company would sell only lightbulbs
2. these examples are too playful and have the word "creative" in them, which makes it hard to reason that they're strictly manufacturing facilities.

The"CBL" you say are incorporated into the lightbulb on the left weren't apparent to me until you pointed it out. I don't personally feel that we *have* to see letters in a mark. The title below it spells it out for us just fine.

The light ray treatment needs more punch. It feels thin and spread out.

zerimar3's picture

ophello, I just wanted to add the logo you were referring to earlier. Thanks.

ophello's picture

This is a totally gimmicky idea...but try it anyway:

let the dot on the 'i' in 'Baselight' become the source of light.

zerimar3's picture

Here's the whole set that I have thus far, posted for comparison.

zerimar3's picture

Do you mean combine the ray of dots to the dot in the "i"?

aluminum's picture

Using a lightbulb for a 'creative' company just isn't very creative. It's cliche.

ophello's picture

aluminum: this was my feeling as well but it's all about execution.

If "light" is an important element, however, you can convey it in many ways.

zerimar3's picture

aluminum, you're probably right. Thanks for your comment. Any suggestions?

ophello, light is an important element to be conveyed in many different ways. I've thought of several but have had a hard time trying to convey "light" in a very abstract form other than something that will again look cliche as aluminum suggests.

ophello's picture

Rays convey light, too.

zerimar3's picture

Here's another sample I worked on over this weekend. Your thoughts on this are highly appreciated. Thank you.

ophello's picture

I like the idea of a light source spitting out magic.

stars are a universal symbol: everyone knows what a star is. I recommend avoiding that symbol because it's terribly predictable. Unless you push the design, you won't surprise your audience. And the placement of the stars in your design is very condensed, clustered, orderly. those concepts are contrary to what you've talked about.

the idea of light breaking through the surface is a good concept. Your experiments with the four light rays was promising and didnt require a recognizable symbol: they were spots radiating outward.

I might also mention: there's a universal rule in typography (somewhat unspoken, but steadfast) that states: never letterspace lowercase letters.     
I  t   d  o  e  s  n  '  t   f   l  o  w...it's really a legibility issue. If you want to space out your letters, always go with an uppercase. Try that and post the results!

Arno Enslin's picture

I might also mention: there's a universal rule in typography (somewhat unspoken, but steadfast) that states: never letterspace lowercase letters.

The rule is primary valid for distinction in body text. And it is always topped by the following rule: Good is, what works. And sometimes letterspaced lowercase letters look fine. But not here.

@ zerimar3

I don’t like the stars, especially not, that you have turned the three stars on the top.

A candle is one of the most basic illuminants. But I would not make a candle of the i.

The problem with those names like baselight is, that they provoke making a matching illustration. While it can be senseful to use a matching illustration for a lamps shop, it is a risk to use such an illustration for an advertising agency, because the word already is the metaphor. Baselight as a name for an agency is a bit plumb or uncool in my opinion, at least, if you don’t want to open a copy shop.

In the two-line-examples from your second image you need edge compensation. The line "CREATIVE" is too long, because of the capital T with its white space in "BASELIGHT".

zerimar3's picture

ophello, the idea of light breaking through the surface is a good concept. Your experiments with the four light rays was promising and didnt require a recognizable symbol: they were spots radiating outward.

I appreciate your thoughts on this. My intention was to stay away from any recognizable symbol on that one as Arno said, the word is already a metaphor.

However, in trying to break the direction of the previous concept, with the CB I wanted something totally different. The stars aren't anything unique; you're right. I was, however, trying to form a capital "B" with the stars. A frail attempt, but it helped break my feel for the direction and adopt a new direction.

Arno, thank you for your comments. I think this sums it up best: The problem with those names like baselight is, that they provoke making a matching illustration. While it can be senseful to use a matching illustration for a lamps shop, it is a risk to use such an illustration for an advertising agency, because the word already is the metaphor.

This has really helped me to think about how "baselight" should be interpreted. I have many more paper sketches that may or may not work, too many to post here. I'm still trying to nail it down.

Since this hasn't been broadcast completely, I was also thinking about discarding the name as well. You said it is plumb and uncool, and I agree to some point. However, considering the target audience, it has potential to function. I originally was going for just "bright creative" but noticed that it was taken already.

I also appreciate both the explanation and clarification for the universal rule on lower case spacing of letters. Thank you. Are there any other suggestions, recommendations, or thoughts you could share? I really appreciate the time and thought put into the comments.

ophello's picture

zerimar - for a self-proclaimed "non-designer" you have many of the successful traits of a good designer. Namely: willingness to listen, openness to change. I think you've got a good shot at doing what it is you plan to do.

With respect to your latest trials...keep making those sketches and don't be afraid to share them, however "unfinished" they may seem. The process of making a successful logo is probably one of the most difficult ventures a designer can undertake. It demands all of one's skills, patience and wisdom.

No design is "good" without a solid concept. It doesn't matter how loose your ideas may seem - get them out in the open and share them.

ophello's picture

My final thought on this: if you keep the name "baselight," I feel that there needs to be a component of energy racing outwards from a common point. There are so many interesting and varying ways to show that. You have your work cut out for you.

It's been interesting seeing the evolution from "logo idea" into "name science." It is obvious that the name and the mark depend on each other. If one changes, the other follows suit.

Ratbaggy's picture

just throwing stuff in the mix, con't really have the time to discuss stuff at length at the moment.

I'm watching and interested in your progress though!

:)

ophello's picture

Rat, that's an interesting concept. Light shining through.

zerimar3's picture

My apologies for no replying sooner, I came to check on this thread. I'm not sure how to set my options to be notified via email immediately following a post.

ophello, thank you very much for your kind comments. They are very encouraging and refreshing. I've been told I have an eye for design. I'm not sure that I do but I know what I like when I see it and dissect it's form/shape. I appreciate the many facets of art form but went into literature during my educational career.

I know I have my work cut out for me. I've started from scratch over the week. I have many pencil sketches but nothing coming to fruition just yet. I do agree that there must be a common point with light/energy racing out of it. However, I've also considered "light" as in light-weight. I've thought of air, foam, bubbles, just things that are weightless regarding light, only to pull away from light as in source of, such as bulb, spark, fire, etc.

Ratbaggy, thanks for your concept and effort in sharing your thought visually. That hadn't crossed my mind as I'm looking for a solid form of a type, but this has opened up an area to explore. Again, light through darkness is great; I'm going to explore it, yet I'm also thinking in terms of weight as much as contrast.

gillo's picture

The CB here is supposed to represent the screw part of a bulb, right? It took me a while to get that. My first impression was that it resembled a compact fluorescent bulb, which plays on the lightbulb/idea theme but, imho (and I have no experience with logo design or branding or what kind of cliches abound these days in those fields), is not quite as predictable and perhaps suggests that the ideas represented are very up-to-date or forward thinking.

riccard0's picture

My first impression was that it resembled a compact fluorescent bulb

Mine too.

zerimar3's picture

gillo, thanks for your comments. You're right, it is the base of the bulb, the screw part. I can see how it would resemble a compact fluorescent bulb as well. However, in my initial post way at the top in the first picture, you'll see the first concept I had. I was trying to combine the letters B,L,C into the concept which looked a bit cartoonish. Now with this concept, I get a feeling that it might be too industrial. It's not bad, but it's not what my initial intention was.

I was aiming for something fun, clean and simply. Youthful and without trying to display the words "base" and "light" in the logo mark.

Arno made a good point earlier in the post by saying, "The problem with those names like baselight is, that they provoke making a matching illustration. While it can be senseful to use a matching illustration for a lamps shop, it is a risk to use such an illustration for an advertising agency, because the word already is the metaphor.

I think it has plenty of truth when working with names like these. However, ophello has made some dynamic points as well which are to be considered regarding the name.

I'm thinking "base" as in the base of a bulb, idea, or even a base in baseball or a foundation of a house or structure. I'm also thinking of "light" as in shining, bright, but also in terms of weight.

I'm sketching up a few more comps as I feel that, to some degree, I've gotten to the final stages a bit too soon without sketching more first. Nonetheless, thank you for your thoughts, I look forward to more of them.

riccard0, thanks for chiming in. Do you have any further thoughts regarding the logo mark or process? I'm open to hearing any input you might have.

Thanks!

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