R descender in logo

firest0rm's picture

Seems like there are some pretty merciless critics here, so give it to me straight. This is my own job of the extra R swoosh. Any suggestions?

Arno Enslin's picture

It does not work. The tail is in disharmony with the font, the changes of the stroke width look arbitrary and the tail breaks the connection between the R and the rest of the word. Except from that it somehow looks more like a P with a tail.

firest0rm's picture

Thanks for the feedback.

I'm definitely no typography expert, so I appreciate your educated opinion. I do find that most Rs, especially ones with swashes, end up looking like Ps with tails if you stare at them for long enough. Anyway, I've studied some other examples and tried again with my swash.

I'm also curious as to what you think of combining serif and sans-serif faces in the Riverland word.

Arno Enslin's picture

I'm definitely no typography expert, so I appreciate your educated opinion.

I am likewise no typography expert.

I do find that most Rs, especially ones with swashes, end up looking like Ps with tails if you stare at them for long enough.

This is partly true. But if the tail is not in harmony with the rest of the R, the eye disconnects both parts. The second tail is slightly better, but it still does not work.

I'm also curious as to what you think of combining serif and sans-serif faces in the Riverland word.

Why do you think, that splitting the word could improve the look? Why do you want to drag attention to the meanings of river and land? And if you use a sans serif and a serif for two parts of a word, the one font really should like the other. But the difference should be clearer. And therefore you can additionally change the contrasts between the fonts in such a couple word by choosing another weight or another color for one of the fonts. But here it is a bad idea. The whole thing looks cobbled together.

Steven Acres's picture

I think you can make the /R/ with a swash look alright, it will just take a lot of work to get it perfect. Editing letterforms is no small task. I would say do not mix the serif/sans, as the first logo looks wayyy more cohesive than the second. It just needs a bit of kerning as "River" seems way more tracked out than "land."

Here's an /R/ with a swash I've done in the past, and it took forever. I considered swooping the /R/ all the way through the logo, but it was just too much, so I kept it really tight within the rest of the logo: http://www.studioimbrue.com/images/portfolio/trattoriarustica/1.jpg

ophello's picture

The weights of the serif and sans are too similar to be effective. It looks unintentional, as if you forgot to change the font for the second half of the word. Id up the contrast in type choice and weight if you're going for a one-two punch phonetically.

Lex Kominek's picture

The new swash is better, but still way too dark/thick. This is because the bottom edge has more of an 'S' shape than the top edge does.

I also agree with Arno that setting "Riverland" in two different typefaces splits the word up and emphasizes the two separate meanings of "river" and "land". I would not do this.

- Lex

hun's picture

i like it!
if there's any problem at all it's not the intention to do this type of the descender thing maybe proportions but overall this looks nice for me. maybe the descending stroke needs a little adjustment - tad thinner, and contour adjustment just a bit
i like extra ascender / descender thing of ordinary alphabets... and i think it has to be experimented a lot to break out of everyday patterns and to come up with new stimulis.. i especially like decorative, curvy, extended strokes in contrast with something more straightforward and conventional - it creates a nice contrast.. sometimes i even want to do the extended thing for y, f lol

have a nice day
hun

Boros's picture

Why does it have to have two visual tweaks - the swash of the R and the two type styles? It's too complicated, simple as it may look.

I would go back to the concept: does a hearing clinic need a classic type treatment? Then do it so with proper swash characters and/or maybe small caps. Try Poetica. Or does it have to be a little hi-tech? Try mixing a modern or neoclassic with a light neo-grotesque sans.

1996type's picture

I think it's better to keep everything serif for better unity. Furthermore, the problem with the R is that it stands out to much. I would make that swash continue in the right diagonal of the v and create a small gap between the swash/right diagonal and the left diagonal. The second swash is the one you should work with.

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