(x) w - generic sans {Mike Y}

rosmedia's picture

what about this one?
: )
I found it at some blog and I think the photo is from New York..

bowfinpw's picture

If this is a manufactured letter from sometime more than 50 years ago, why does it have to be anything more than a 'generic' sans W? It certainly wasn't from a digital font.

- Mike Yanega

Aure's picture

Could you explain to me what are you talking about when you say 'generic' sans W ?
Each caracter is part of a typeface family didn't it ?
As some typefaces have been made during the 15-16th centuries, if there is "olny" 50 years ago it's not as long as that no?
Thanks for lighting up my brain of very beginner typefaces lover.
:)

riccard0's picture

Each caracter is part of a typeface family didn't it ?

Not necessarily. Often just single (or few) letters are needed, thus designed.

bowfinpw's picture

My comment about the 'generic' sans was just that almost any sans would have a W like that. I also think if you were to ask almost anyone to draw a W, that is the shape you would get -- so in that sense it is 'generic' too.

My other point in mentioning 50 years, is that the photo is clearly from a pre-digital era, so font, the way most of us use it isn't so applicable. Many pre-digital typefaces were never made into digital fonts.

I hope that helps explain my remarks.

- Mike Yanega

rosmedia's picture

well explained, Mike Y.

however I thought they had some sort of type or font as a model, when they made large signs like that.

bowfinpw's picture

Kay, it doesn't seem that they would have needed one. As I said, that is the shape anyone would draw to represent a block W, as some call it. If you were to use a ruler to draw a W, isn't that what you would produce?

- Mike Yanega

Aure's picture

Ok Mike I understand your answer from now :)
It's pretty clear I'm ok with you.
Thanks for your feedback !

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