Artist/Painter name and mark critique

tre's picture

I'm working on a logo for a artist that does commissioned paintings. Her style is loose, colorful, and playful. She works as a pediatric nurse so many of her commissions have been "childrens paintings" of colorful turtles and the like, but she doesn't want her branding to limit her to that niche. Her company name is westwerk arts. These are the fist iterations of the logo.

tre's picture

PS interested in getting some feedback on the name. This is what the client gave me but is not married to it. Is it clear between the name and the mark what the product/service is?

penn's picture

The type seems too 'techy' — I'd explore other options there.

It's also very close to the mark — add more space between.

What is 'westwerks'? Is that her name? If not, I'd question why she's not using her name.

tre's picture

I see your point on the type. The through was this; she does a lot of children's art because of her day job as a pediatric nurse, but doesn't want to get pigeonholed into working in just that genera. She wanted her logo to reflect the looseness of her style while maintaining a refined image. This is to be able to appeal to corporate commissions as well as her current client base. I customized the type here to add more stylized elements as opposed to using standard sans characters. That was the intent. Knowing that do you think that was accomplished?

Her last name is westphal. My suggestion to here was to use the name westwerks without the art at the end, but to include a tagline as apart of the over all ID. Something more explicitly describing her services

Jennifer E. Dahl's picture

Does she sign her pieces? Would this logo be on every mural she paints? If not she should reconsider using anything other than her actual name. If I were to commission a painting I'd look for an artist not a company.

tre's picture

Great point @Jennifer

Tomi from Suomi's picture

From typographers point of view: 't' and 'w' are too far apart, and 'r' and 'k' also. To my eye 'r' is way too wide. Also, same thing with the last 'r' and 't'.

I can not see any serious artist signing any work with silk screen signature.

boozdewinters's picture

I agree with Jennifer. The name is the most important aspect to any artist.

And in regards to catering to a more diverse client pool, it does not necessarily mean that a rigid and angular typeface should be used. The mark definitely implies that 'westwerks art'has something to with paintings, but it does not portray her as an artist. Some might interpret that as a logo for an art gallery. And also there is no sense of playfulness or looseness (as is her painting style) being conveyed by the logo at the moment, mainly because of the mark being accompanied by the rigid typeface.

I hope this helps.

Good Luck with your further explorations

tre's picture

?

kattttor's picture

getting a Dinsey feel from that 'p' and type in general. The type is still very close the mark.

The mark is very nice but I'd choose another typeface.

penn's picture

What about just using her signature (sans mark)?

tre's picture

Thought of that but frankly what she signs her work with isn't that sexy and I think something else is better to build an enterprise around. The long term goal for her is to build this brand into online and brick and mortar marketplaces for distributing and retailing her art. So I'm branding more than just the artist.

tre's picture

an example of what I'm talking about
http://www.nopattern.com/nopattern/
Chuck Anerson the artist NOPATTERN the Brand.

Ratbaggy's picture

Sure it doesn't necessarily need to be said...
The NoPattern 'brand' has nothing to do with a logo. It's got a hell of a lot more to do with ego and getting your work in the 'right' places.

evanbrog's picture

She wanted her logo to reflect the looseness of her style while maintaining a refined image.

Then in that case it seems to me the mark is the looseness and her name is refined--if I'm not mistaken that's what you were going for in the first draft. It's just that wasn't the best choice of a font. I would think nice clean, uppercase sans serif. Maybe it has just a bit of character or playfulness (just a tad). Using a script might be to formal for a loose painter. I think you can probably say professional without saying too formal.

evanbrog's picture

She wanted her logo to reflect the looseness of her style while maintaining a refined image.

Then in that case it seems to me the mark is the looseness and her name is refined--if I'm not mistaken that's what you were going for in the first draft. It's just that wasn't the best choice of a font. I would think nice clean, uppercase sans serif. Maybe it has just a bit of character or playfulness (just a tad). Using a script might be to formal for a loose painter. I think you can probably say professional without saying too formal.

tre's picture

@Ratbaggy not sure what you mean. Is that a critique of the methods or of chuck?

Ratbaggy's picture

neither really. just a comment...the brand wasn't created with a 'logo'

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