Polish Language l-slash glyph

TypeSETit's picture

I've been working on one of my fonts— an update that will be available in OpenType. Recently, I completed a version of the same font for a client in Poland. She needed some of the Central European characters. After doing the work, she requested that I revise the l-slash (unicode 0142) because she said it looked too much like a lowercase T. She asked that the slash be placed high on the character, so I gave her what you see here, and she loved it.

I personally think it looks wrong, but I'm not sure how to go about resolving the look before I release it for OpenType. I was thinking of placing the slash low on the glyph, but I'm not sure if that's the right way to go either. Any suggestions?

Thanks

dezcom's picture

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TypeSETit's picture

Not so much different from Ochmonek. The stress is on the second syllable, AFAIK.

So, Ogonek is pronounced Ah-gah-nek ?

And forgive me, but I'm not familiar with "AFAIK" ... ?

Rob

Jennie Wojtulewicz's picture

I find this thread to be absolutely fascinating. I'm a grad student in digital literacy at Arizona State University and thought I knew *everything* about fonts. There are so many unfamiliar terms in this thread I feel like I am in a wonderland of typography!

Thank you for clearing up the pronunciation of Ogonek. I have never heard/seen this term and had a difficult time pronouncing it!

paul d hunt's picture

AFAIK = as far as i know

TypeSETit's picture

Ahhh, AFAIK... I get it now!

TANX

(TANX = thank you)

froo's picture

Ogohneck. Stress on the second o. O's sound like o in "oat". (Or to better explain pronounciation of o and the barred l, when tou say "water" - we hear "łoter").

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