Where can you find these ribbon like swooshes that are everywhere these days?

Plaidjaney's picture

bemerx25's picture

Illustrator (or vector artwork program of your choice) is your friend. You make 'em. Or you can buy dingbat fonts that have such elements (or even regular fonts that have them), but really it's very easy to do on your own. Set up some custom illustrator brushes and have a go. The ones that are worth keeping, save in an illustrator file that you can then load as a Illustrator brush set for future projects.

Plaidjaney's picture

Thanks for the response. I use illustrator, but I'm not very good at using the brush tool. When I've loaded the calligraphy brushes and tried to imitate, my result doesn't have the elegant thick thin I'm seeing. Do you have a favorite brush?

blank's picture

Sudtipos calligraphic fonts are packed with this kind of stuff. iStock has tons of stuff, and there are stock packs of ornaments like this that you can buy.

If you want to do this in illustrator the calligraphic brushes don’t cut it, you really need to draw custom art brushes from paths that taper and keep applying them to the stroke to get what you want. Another option is to draw unstroked paths in Illustrator, print them, trace them with calligraphy markers, and then scan those to retrace digitally.

oprion's picture

Create a new art brush, and apply it to to bézier curve.
As easy as I-II-III


_____________________________________________
Personal Art and Design Portal of Ivan Gulkov
www.ivangdesign.com

Plaidjaney's picture

Thank you so much for itemizing the steps I've got step III (although mine looks a lot less smooth), but HOW did you get that shape for for step I and II?

Plaidjaney's picture

Thank you for your tip on Sudtipos. Those fonts are amazing!

oprion's picture

@ Plaidjaney

The shapes for step one are simply drawn with a pen tool.
_____________________________________________
Personal Art and Design Portal of Ivan Gulkov
www.ivangdesign.com

dirtcastle's picture

Nice example, Oprion!

There are a number of pre-fab font and stock options for this, such as Aridi Printers Ornaments or Bickham Script ornaments.

But I have found that a pre-fab ornament rarely works. And while I'm no master swoosh illustrator. I definitely agree that drawing, even a simple rudimentary ornament, is the way to go if possible.

Oprion's brush trick is a good one. In addition to drawing shapes by hand, you can also use the spiral tool and the blend tool to create smooth shapes. But if you have difficulty using the pen tool, the only substitute is additive/subtractive combining of paths using Pathfinder.

Also, if you can draw by hand, you can scan and trace ornaments. A lot of people use this method because it frees you up to try lots of different ornament arrangements.

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