go green

MrKikkoman's picture

Made a quick logo/concept for my sister. It's going to be for a blog that provides information on "green" services and what not in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

The mark is Texas and the orange part represents DFW.

Not sure if I feel satisfied about it, but she likes it. What do you think?

microspective's picture

The concept is great. The shape of the largest leaf is funky. I think you can alter its shape in a way that both perfects the balance of the mark and maintains the shape of the state. There's also something about the top left leaves that disrupt the balance.

Nice type. The kerning isn't so hot, though. Either tighten up "reen" to match the "go" and "gr" or loosen "gog." I personally think the tighter version might look a bit better.

evanbrog's picture

Is there any leaf that's very specific to Texas? the state tree or something? I remember a lot of pecan trees from my last visit

MrKikkoman's picture

Well, the pecan tree is the state tree here. However, I live here and didn't even know that without looking it up, so I don't believe modeling the leaves after pecan leaves will be that significant.

On the plus side, the leaves do look like pecan tree leaves. =)

penn's picture

It was really hard for me to make out the shape of Texas in the leaves. The idea isn't bad though. I'd push the development a bit further. Also, the orange color makes it seem like that leaf is dead. Is that what you want for the key area?

penn

microspective's picture

@penn,

I thought that, too (orange=dead leaf), but with a call to action like "go green," it implies that they are not yet green and need to be. Thoughts?

katedawson1's picture

I really didn't see the texas shape until someone pointed it out. At first I thought, "Why are the leaves plopped in that awkward configuration?" I like the texas-shape idea, but I don't think this is quite right yet. ____________________________
www.coroflot.com/kate_dawson

Miss Tiffany's picture

In order for this to work, IMHO, you need more/smaller shapes to articulate the single/large shape. Unilever does a good job of this.

penn's picture

Unilever, yes good example.

penn

evanbrog's picture

and you could also do such a treatment with the lonestar itself

MrKikkoman's picture

Good ideas. Thanks for all the feedback.

Ya, I've seen the Unilever logo before but was hoping to achieve the same effect with simpler shapes. I can try out some different configurations of the leaves.

I can see how orange can resemble a dead leaf. Hmmm

evanbrog's picture

Maybe this logo does ride the coattails of uni-lever, but having lots of small little shapes certainly relates to the presentation of information in blog format. Perhaps, if done right, you leave a lone-star over the dallas/fort worth area made by negative space

jonathanhughes's picture

Although the fact that the leaves are Texas might be made more obvious with a little tweaking, I saw that it was texas right away.

Kirs10's picture

I didn't see Texas until I read your goal. The shape needs to be tweaked a little and you've gotten some good suggestions. I'd like to add one, try making all of the leaves one shade of green and the DFW leaf a different shade of green and match that color to the letters "DFW". I believe using one color for the overall shape of Texas will help unify the parts into a whole.

theplatypus's picture

The action word, "GO" also indicates progression or advancement. Is there a way to portray this using screens or sizes of the leaves to become progressively more Green? 'Cause our society can't "Go Green" over night.

best regards,
daniel

covertjapan's picture

in addition to others comments, you need to finess all of the leaves. make all of the curves perfect and harmonious with each other.

kamolahy's picture

Keep at it. Leaves are a tired symbol, but using them to become a different object could work. I think you just need to keep reworking the concept. I didn't see texas until you mentioned it. Maybe abstract the shapes of the leaves to become more interesting and lend to the shape of the state. You're doing vice versa and abstracting the shape of the state to maintain the shapes of the leaves and it's confusing.

You have a great concept so keep iterating until you hit jackpot.

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