1689 Tombstone Font

malbright's picture

Found this beautiful inscription here in London. Look at those alternate characters. And that ampersand!

Any ideas on what might come close?

processcamera's picture

You could try submitting a smaller picture of the inscription to the Ampersand Blog:
http://ampersand.gosedesign.net/contact/

Special-K's picture

What is the small 'E' and 'D' all about?

bowfinpw's picture

Getting back to your original question Mike, have you looked at some of the antique type revival fonts from Ted Staunton at Sherwood Fonts, like Mayflower, based on a 1610 bible?

- Mike Yanega

DPape's picture

That might come close: Igino Marini's FELL Great Primer Roman SC http://www.hifonts.net/en/hiFont.2471

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

What is the small ’E’ and ’D’ all about?

I imagine that those were ways of saving space... If you look at old manuscripts and even early printed books, you will see many abbreviated words -- the abbreviations were a way to save space or make words fit. (By the way, I just found a PDF on early American tombstone inscriptions here.)

bowfinpw's picture

The interesting thing to me is the inconsistency of the way some of the contractions were done. For example, one "THE" uses an HE ligature, but others don't, and isn't YE just an archaic form of THE? It's almost like the stonecarver found his layout needed these adaptations to maintain symmetry on the face of the stone, as each line is centered. Almost as if he worked from the edges toward the center.

- Mike Yanega

oprion's picture

"isn’t YE just an archaic form of THE?"
Technically, it isn't Ye as much as

(þe), written with a thorn that looked very much like, and was often mistaken for a Y.
_____________________________________________
Personal Art and Design Portal of Ivan Gulkov
www.ivangdesign.com

marcox's picture

"Ye" is a personal pronoun -- think "you" or "y'all." :)

(Second-person singular and plural are the technical terms.)

"Oh ye of little faith..."
"Judge not, that ye be not judged."

bowfinpw's picture

Marc, I recognize that usage too, but in this case it doesn't seem to be used as a pronoun.

- Mike Yanega

oprion's picture

“Ye” is a personal pronoun — think “you” or “y’all.” :)
Not on this tombstone :)
_____________________________________________
Personal Art and Design Portal of Ivan Gulkov
www.ivangdesign.com

marcox's picture

Good point, guys. I didn't read the inscription itself, only the comments.

Ah, the joys of English (which was much less standardized in those days).

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