Transparent business card

addison's picture

I have a request from an architect client for a transparent business card. Papers such as Glama Natural and Neenah UV may do the trick, but he would like a clear business card--like acetate. Can anyone offer any advice concerning this? Is silkscreening an option?

Thanks,
Addison

typeo's picture

Hey, Addison:
A client of mine had a clear business card done
on velum, printed on one side and then laminated in color. It looked great.
She has friends in Australia that do this sort of thing. Looking in the Bay Area for this type of thing.

dan's picture

Mike to avoid double posts, when you get the error message, consider that a message your post is posted. To check just go back one page and scroll up to topics, you will see your name listed as the last post in your forum.

Addison, I would think silk screening would be the way to go but, what I would do first is contact a print broker. A print broker usually has a small plant but is wired into other printers who have different kinds of presses like letter press and of course silk screen.

addison's picture

Thanks, Mike and Daniel.

I'm not familiar with print brokers--not sure there's one in Mississippi. I know of a silkscreen shop to contact, but just in case--can you suggest an out of state print broker?

Thanks,
Addison

addison's picture

Thanks for the heads-up, Tiffany. It's not negative--it's ummm, professional awareness. There are a few printers here that find press checks insulting.

adriano's picture

This was presented on yayhooray, it looks very good to me. Specially the "translucid" plastic.

mica's picture

Hot stamping is another way to decorate plastic. A very good friend of mine runs a hot stamping and plastic fab company. You can reach UR Unlimited best by phone (707 528 8871) since their website doesn't have much information. You want to speak with Gary or Mayumi.

My dad helped him build a huge laser for his business and we hire them to hot-stamp our plastic injection-molded pickup covers.

I've mentioned in another thread the usefulness of nameplate makers for these unusual requests. These are the guys that regularly diecut and print on plastics, and they are pros. I think there's a danger of a clear business card looking hoaky if it isn't done very well.

dan's picture

Tiffany, sorry you've had bad experiences with print brokers. I've had nothing but good experiences with them and I've never been denied access to a press check. The idea of working with a print broker is to build a relationship and with the relationship - Trust.

Addison, have you tried looking on the internet for speciality printing?

addison's picture

Adriano, that's the look we're going for. But actually, the image on the computer in the background shows a totally transparent card--looks like from a yayhooray messsageboard.

Mica, thanks for the info--I may look them up. Anything unique like that would be great.

Daniel, no, I haven't done much looking yet, but I've got to do that. You all have already helped a lot.

Thanks,
Addison

addison's picture

I've requested information from this company:

http://www.plasticprinters.com/

dan's picture

Tiffany, I often work in consort with a print broker bidding on a job. They know there will be at least 3 bids on a print job. By working closely with me they can even give me ideas that will make the job look great but also save my client money. They don't want to piss me off I make them money too!

Sorry for diverting the subject from Allisons need. In Photoshop users magazine there are lots of short run digital printers throughout the US. My guess is they are in places with cheap facilities (Rent). You might check out one of these sites, but, you probably won't end up doing a press check in a traditional way. They might post a proof online. One site you might check on is CreativePro.

Miss Tiffany's picture

I would be very careful of working with print brokers. Most are highly protective of their information and contacts. If you personally want to press check it, for example, most print brokers will not allow this. (Boy I sound negative)

Miss Tiffany's picture

Daniel, that is great. I wish I could find one that I could trust. I've just found that I would prefer to be there myself and hear the excuses and reasons firsthand.

For instance, before the press I frequent started doing film in-house I'd output the film myself. The press would often blame the film for being out of register by a dot or so. I would find ways to output/design the job so the film could be smaller. Now, however, they output the film for me and I can simply tease them about their film. I have a wonderful long-standing relationship with the press and feel as if I've learned more from getting dirty at the press (so to speak).

I've also dealt with some brokers that told me how much they mark up the job and found that to be too much. So I act as the broker for my own design clients keeping the price lower.

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