Looking for a typeface with a invert 3 instead of the E

la_mamzelle's picture

looking for a typeface with a invert 3 instead of the E

Thanks

Miss Tiffany's picture

Chank's Stomper -- but I also agree with Stephen, the results could be more unique and interesting.

:-)

hrant's picture

But flipping can ruin stroke topology.

hhp

Miss Tiffany's picture

huh? haha! Sorry, Hrant, I read that remark as a joke. In which case if you aren't joking I guess it makes sense. I need to bone up on my "typographic" vocabulary.

la_mamzelle's picture

I've already think to make change the E by a 3, but i tought that it was not professionnal...

???

eomine's picture

I don't think Hrant is joking. Although mirroring a character may be applied to most vertical-stressed typefaces (Bodoni or Univers, for example) without major harms. But imagine what happens if you flip Garamond's "3"...

"Not professional"? It depends on the typeface you will flip, and of course, the way you do the whole thing. Getting a proper flipped-3 "E" and doing a bad layout/logo won't be much "professional" IMHO.

So, you might wanna check Eplica by Yvonne Dietrich and Locator Display by Eric Olson.

John Nolan's picture

Dyadis is another.

la_mamzelle's picture


image/tiffexample
typo.tif (75.9 k)



I found this one, do someone know the name?

roballoo's picture

Maybe I'm stating the obvious, but just in case it has yet to be considered...

After inverting the 3 you could then modify it (Or, make your own from scratch) so that it fit in more harmoniously with the rest of the letters used.

cph's picture

Or you could rotate the 3 180 degrees rather than reflecting it.

hrant's picture

But then you'd probably ruin the vertical proportional topology.

hhp

bieler's picture

Hrant

Yes. My heart dropped when I realized no one knew what you were talking about. Geeez.

hrant's picture

I'm sure most do, it's just that my wording was so "ceremonial" that it threw people off. And the second time it was intentionally so! :-)

hhp

beejay's picture

Renner's Topic/Steile Futura has an alternate E that
looks three-ish. It's from the early 1950s.

Pakenham, Tasse and Solex are descendants.
Don't know whether these have the 3E thing
but you could check. There might be other
descendants, too.

bj

typotect's picture

If you have Swash Italic versions of any of your fonts you'll be able to find plenty of scripty Es in there.

Fabio Augusto's picture

Another is ITC Conduit, but 3E is a
alternative only

See here:
http://www.itcfonts.com/fonts/detail.asp?nCo=AFMT&sku=ITC9231

cph's picture

Let's make up a name then.

serafino's picture

Colin Harnett

How about "THR333FLOP"

Do you folk think this is really a good idea? Italics maybe! The ITC is Oblique, (fake italic). There are lots traditional THR333FLOP italic examples.

"Branding Iron Typography." Really, anyone into a can of pork and beans? Should we sing "Home, home on the range?"

My advice, forget it!

Gerald Giampa

Melina's picture

> invert 3 instead of the E

Maybe CerebralPares Falk?

beejay's picture

backwards three

beejay's picture

that should read eerht!

hrant's picture

What about "spineless E"?

hhp

Jared Benson's picture

Emigre's Tarzana comes immediately to mind.

Stephen Coles's picture

Why not use any font and invert the 3 yourself?

Jared Benson's picture

I'm adding that phrase to the SmallTalk Generator. Just in time for Typecon too!

If it's been a while, http://www.typophile.com/smalltalk/

Joe Pemberton's picture

Now, can someboey tell us if that form of E has a name.
Surely it's not a flopped 3.

I'm sure it's use (more recently popularized by Tarzana) has
more to do with a direct reference to italics than a total
invention. Looking at Tarzana's E, it fits perfectly with some
other italic-inspired elements (the R, a, k as well as the
serifs in general).

For reference

Joe Pemberton's picture

Ok, I know I must have read this when it first came out...

Emigre's description of Tarzana:
The roman (upright) and italic versions were designed simultaneously, with the purpose of cross-pollination. In some instances, roman character designs were developed on the basis of the italics, resulting in such features as the curved arm on the lower case "k," the asymmetric capital "Y," and the rounded capital "E," yielding an informal feel to the entire family.

Bald Condensed's picture

>> My heart dropped when I realized no one knew what
you were talking about. Geeez.


> I'm sure most do, it's just that my wording was so
"ceremonial" that it threw people off.


Reading too much comic books is damaging for your
ability to comprehend words of more than two syllables.
=D

Here's a couple from the exquisite Fountain collection:
Corpus Gothic Alternative | Grimoire | OGRA
There are also quite a few with rounded UC 'E's like the
wonderful Schlager and UDO a.o.

Bald Condensed's picture

> Or you could rotate the 3 180 degrees rather than
reflecting it.


I certainly wouldn't do that! Hrant is right, and it
certainly would come out wrong, whereas flipping
might be less harmful (it all depends on the design
of the typeface).

Bald Condensed's picture

> Now, can somebody tell us if that form of E has a name.
Surely it's not a flopped 3.


I don't think it has a name, as it is a pure design
alternative, not a different character.

Joe Pemberton's picture

Yves wrote:
I don't think it has a name, as it is a pure design
alternative, not a different character.


True. A name would be overkill, but calling it a flopped 3
is a mistake. Emigre calls it a rounded E and I would
offer italic-inspired E as a worthy alternative.

Bald Condensed's picture

Nah, that doesn't sound as good. Funny, I actually
came up with "eerth" too. It starts off with an E
sound and the word gives away very well what it is.

Bald Condensed's picture

Oooh, clever! :-)

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