Italian font?

petapi's picture

I'm looking for Italian fonts for a logo, any suggestions would be helpful thank you.

Chris Keegan's picture

Check out Mostra

nina's picture

Looking/feeling Italian, or by an Italian designer?
Why?
What's the logo for?

petapi's picture

I'm looking for all options so anything from Italian looking, to Italian designer is good.
It's for a range of Italian food products.
Thank you for your help

Bert Vanderveen's picture

Check out this site with recent italian fonts:
http://www.progetto-italic.org/

(It's a site coupled with a wonderful book called “Italic 2.0”).

. . .
Bert Vanderveen BNO

Rene Verkaart's picture

It would be interesting to know what marks 'an italian design'. I've had a client recently ask me the same. He wanted an Italian style logo. He marked it as brown/yellow toned, modern and 'designerish'. That's not enough for me to make a good logo...
So if anyone has some thoughts on how to make a good Italian style logo, please hook up here.

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.00's picture

Something that was done with our Giacomo

hrant's picture

Pursuing Rene's line of thought:
What makes Giacomo Italian (beside the name)?

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

Montalbano sounds kind of Italian :-)

daniele capo's picture

[ Montalbano, indeed, is the name of a famous detective in a series of books by the italian writer Andrea Camilleri (but the name of the detective is an homage to another writer: Manuel Vazquez Montalban). ]

I find Mostra so "Italy, 1930" that every time I see it I feel like I’m going to drink a bottle of castor oil.

Rene Verkaart's picture

Looking at Mostra and Giacomo, they seem to be quite different. Mostra is very sharp and geometric, where Giacomo is soft and warm.
I think the hard part is if you try to define a certain style that covers a few centuries. Perhaps we should narrow it down to the last 40 years?

Ok, let me make a kick-off (and I'm surely not an expert on Italian style fonts). Italian style fonts:
- are quite often 'fat' like Extra Bold or Black
- quite often have a slightly rotated backwards 'e', giving it a diagonal cross bar
- are mainly serif fonts
- can ofcourse be sans serif and then often have soft endings

How far am I off? ;-)
Now it's your turn.

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.00's picture

I'm a Sicilian-American, not an Italian. I don't think Giacomo is particularly Italian. I do think that it is particularly me. The design of the Crema label does follow a particular vague Italian style, but it wasn't done by an Italian. Eurostyle, Microgramma, Egiziano were done by Novarese. Are they particularly Italian? Perhaps. The fonts shown on the Progetto-Italic site don't strike me as particularly Italian either.

Rene Verkaart's picture

James, from your point of view, is there something particular that gives you a warm feeling when you thing of italian fonts?
Perhaps the possible smell of a really nice pizzzzzzza? ;-)

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Rene Verkaart's picture

I googled Aldo Novarese and he's created an impressive portfolio of fonts! Them being all different makes the question even more difficult. Finding more and more italian style fonts takes me even farther away from the finish line.

My god, I still love Eurostyle. I'e used it throughout my complete academy time and it brings back a lot of good memories.

hrant's picture

BTW, there's a newborn magazine (for which I'm writing
a review) that people into this thread might enjoy:
http://www.tipoitalia.it/

Needless to say, they make a point of
using fonts with a strong Italian angle.

hhp

.00's picture

I dunno, except for the obvious references, not very italian to me.

Nick Shinn's picture

My most Italianate faces: Beaufort, Eunoia, Nicholas.

Mark Simonson's picture

I find Mostra so “Italy, 1930” that every time I see it I feel like I’m going to drink a bottle of castor oil.

That made me laugh. :-)

daniele capo's picture

Yesterday I was just talking with a friend calligrapher about what identify Italy, graphically. She suggested me that outside Italy, for example for food packaging, we are identified by smooth, curvaceous scripts, etc., and not by the sharpness of futurism (we are living a futurism revival for the 100th anniversary of the futurism manifesto, and everything become irritating when is coupled with the quasi-fascist social decline of our country).

Then I suggest to look at some late 19th century typeface and, if you have the opportunity, at the actual packaging of the period.

@Mark
I wish I could laugh

Mark Simonson's picture

Sorry. I'm not saying it's funny what happened in Italy in the 1930s. I know what you meant. It was just that your reaction to the face was not the one I usually get.

daniele capo's picture

Mark, don’t worry, it was only a joke :-)

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