1942 Metal Type

Devadaru's picture

The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, published in New York in 1942. Printed by The Haddon Craftsmen, Inc., Camden, NJ.

What might these faces be? Oh, the text must be Transitional Roman by Rudolph Ruzicka, but the only digital edition I have seen lacks a full character set—Missing ligatures like ff, ffl, ffi, missing full set of superscript figures, missing characters like ā, ś; (and the parentheses are don't come close to matching the original). Any other digital versions of this or a similar typeface?

How about the title face and ornaments?

Thanks. —D

PublishingMojo's picture

It's certainly Ruzicka's Fairfield. The thin strokes appear thicker because the 1942 sample was printed by letterpress. The capital T in the digital version of Fairfield has serifs that are slightly different than this (probably Linotype) version.

Devadaru's picture

Thanks. Yes, the beauty of letterpress! An ideal digital transformation would take that "thickening" effect into account, no?

How about the title face, "Master and Disciple"? That looks like something else. (This is a chapter heading). And those ornaments?

PublishingMojo's picture

The caps look like Fairfield too. Not sure about the ornaments. They're probably Monotype or foundry type. You'd need to research old metal type specimen books to find an exact ID, but if you just want something with that look and feel, try Arabesque™ Ornaments.

Devadaru's picture

See the serifs on the S of the caps: they slant, whereas the Fairfield serifs are perfectly vertical. Also, the leg of the R is straight, but curvy in Fairfield. Again, the top of the T is perfectly flat; not so Fairfield. Maybe not Fairfield? Or a variant?...

PublishingMojo's picture

You're right, the title isn't Fairfield. It's Goudy's Deepdene. The high-waisted E and the bowl of the P gave it away.

Devadaru's picture

Thanks for your help. Well done.

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