Fabulous modern script on Flickr a must-see

dezcom's picture

You have got to see this gem posted by Aron Jancso from Budapest.

http://flickr.com/photos/mil3n/2252183004/in/pool-607735@N20

ChrisL

PublishingMojo's picture

You can't resist reading this 'cause it's so hard to read. "What a pretty design . . . Oh wait, are those letters?" It throws the whole rule book out the window:
Discarded Rule 1: Script fonts should look like calligraphy, so they should have an oblique stress.
Discarded Rule 2: Don't use script for all caps (that first line says WHY, doesn't it?).
Discarded Rule 3: Don't reverse a font with hairline strokes out of a black background.

eliason's picture

Wyu
Tournées
Fcench
FiCm
Festiyol

What's so hard to read about that?

dezcom's picture

Rule 4: Nobody ever used a script when readability was the prime motive.
Rule 5: Rules don't apply to the unruly
Rule 6: Those who make the rules get to break the rules
Rule &: "It is good to be King"

ChrisL

Stephen Coles's picture

Clearly a Bantjes fan.

dezcom's picture

Maybe so, Stewf but it is different, less handmade looking.

ChrisL

Sharon Van Lieu's picture

I think it is beautiful. What do the first two lines say?

Sharon

nina's picture

"WKU Tournées." Though I didn't actually manage to read the WKU part, I found that out by reading the comments. (Seems to be a school?)

Anyway … I agree that it's wonderful. And impressive! I wish I could do something halfway resembling this.

Áron Jancsó's picture

hi folks!
im Aron.
thanks for all the comments about my design!
Stepehn you are right, it was the time when Marian Bantjes was my favorite designer. :)
and about legibility...
well :)
i started learning graphic design just a year before, so im a beginner. just wanted to make something nice like Marian does.

(btw: wku tournées french film festival, and it was a class assignment at wku, graphic design course)

Zara Evens's picture

Beautiful, and yes - it looks an awful lot like Bantjes work, especially her Seduction poster for Yale.

There are most definitely times when I wish I could replicate her style.

Áron Jancsó's picture

yeah, Seduction is one of my faves :)

Quincunx's picture

> You can’t resist reading this ’cause it’s so hard to read. “What a pretty design . . . Oh wait, are those letters?” It throws the whole rule book out the window:
Discarded Rule 1: Script fonts should look like calligraphy, so they should have an oblique stress.
Discarded Rule 2: Don’t use script for all caps (that first line says WHY, doesn’t it?).
Discarded Rule 3: Don’t reverse a font with hairline strokes out of a black background.

I had no problem reading it.

The stuff about the rules is a pile of crap, no offence. :)
1. Who says script fonts should look like calligraphy?
2. All caps... I actually see 'wku' in lowercase, if you compare them to T and F's from the other lines.
3. Exactly why should you not reverse hairline from a black background? Seems it's working fine...

Wesley.Bancroft's picture

What I am curious about is if this was done on a grid? and did you do any hand/sketched comps... those would be nice to see. : )

and speaking of Bantjes, is anyone going to Art Center of the 13th to hear her speak? Be there.

piccic's picture

Who says script fonts should look like calligraphy?

Hmm… lettering should at least resemble letters, otherwise it's a code, and not script[ure]…
It seems "fonts" have nothing to do with that kind of illustration treatment, as much as I appreciated Lee Schultz Antionette and Salome.
In a similar vein, I think Missionary by Miles Newlyn is a good example to indicate an extreme limit you can reach if you wish to write a text meant to be read, and not decoded, after which letters become mere illustrations.

For example, which has been the idea behind making Restraint as a typeface? Id' be curious to know…
It's a pattern generator in the form of a typeface, and it helps by mechanizing the ornamentation elements, but it's no longer a typeface.

Leilajax's picture

A nice poster design! thanks for sharing.

Leila,

Quincunx's picture

> Hmm… lettering should at least resemble letters, otherwise it’s a code, and not script[ure]…

Well, they are letters? :) I asked 'who says script fonts should look like calligraphy', since Victor Curran said that that is a rule. A script -- or maybe lettering is a better word -- only has to look like calligraphy if the designer wants it to.

That they should look like calligraphy is a rediculous claim/rule, in my opinion, which is proven by Marian Bantjes and Aron.

scottsullivan's picture

SOSO hottttttt

- Scott Sullivan

kosal's picture

I wouldn't call it a modern script. Typographic experiment/drawing is more like it. That way's everybody's happy.

dezcom's picture

I am happy whatever you call it.

ChrisL

SuperUltraFabulous's picture

I love love love that!

The script that is.

The bottom half of that poster is just okeedokey.

Turn the script into a font.

You have rocked, and you shall rock again!

Mikey :-)

Áron Jancsó's picture

thank you very much for all the kind comments!

about the rules...
i wasn't even aware of such things :D

Wesley,
no drawings on paper, just did it with vectors, it was a half a day's work. and i did in in flash :D, so its not really professional, for example the hairlines aren't shrinking, there's only a gradient on them :)
(don't ask why flash and not illustrator... i didn't even know how to use illustrator at that time)

and check my other works if you like (mostly typographic stuff): http://www.flickr.com/mil3n/

piccic's picture

Quincunx: You don't understand what I meant: they are letters, but they are used in a way that becomes more illustration than word, so the text meaning is the second thing you get.
I am not saying this is not good, I just said, as you agree, that this is lettering illustration, or art, as in English art seems to be used for any graphic endeavor.

The fact that one might like it or not is not the key, since taste may be pretty deceiving.
I have tried to incorporate such abstract treatments in typeface design, and I find more interest in this than the simple use of letters in illustration, that's what I mean.
But of course, being an illustration, it depends on the whole essence of its communication as desired by the author.

For example, I prefer a lot Áron's typeface Milen Serif. I would make alternative attempts to re-evaluation of the weight distribution (especially on [c], [s] and [y]), but the alphabet it is done with great consciousness, and the layout choosen to present it and choice of colors are immersive and successful.

Of course, Victor Curran comment did not make much sense.

I am happy whatever you call it.
LOL… :=)

Turn the script into a font.

Áron Jancsó's picture

thank you, piccic!
yes, you are right about the c,s,y. i'm not finished with this face. i have to work on some other letters too.

Quincunx's picture

@Aron
"about the rules...
i wasn’t even aware of such things :D
"

Don't be, those 'rules' were nonsense. :)

@Claudio:
I agree. :)

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