Forgotten Fonts?

Conkleton's picture

As part of project I'm doing for the final year of my degree I'd like peoples opinions on fonts that have been "forgotten". Fonts that have been brushed over or left behind but deserve more recognition and use. My example is Cassandre's Exotic 350, what does everybody else think?

Graham McArthur's picture

Cassandre’s Exotic 350 deserves to be forgotten.
Hasn't this thread been done before?

Anyway, I am in a posting mood tonight for some reason. My examples:

the original Healey from John Haddon & Co, London
Goudy Catalogue & Catalogue Italic
Old Style from Miller & Richard, Edinburgh and London - designed by Alexander Phemister in the 1850's
Bernard Roman from Frederic Wesselhoeft, Ltd, London - designed by Lucian Bernard in 1924-28
Carlton from H W Caslon & Co, London and not the ITC version
the original Stellar designed by Robert Hunter Middleton - its a sans, sorry Michael.
and lastly Hans Mohring's 1928 designs for his Elegant Face series including the Outline Face - a sans family, again, sorry Michael, but you will understand.

Conkleton's picture

Yes, as Kent points out, it seems David R has already beaten me to it, thank you all the same for your suggestions Graham.

will powers's picture

C'mon now. Cassandre never designed a type called Exotic 350.

He did design a face called Peignot, though.

David Rault's picture

Graham: this typeface's name on this page is Exotic 350 for some obscure reasons (CorelDraw renaming?), but it is obviously Peignot light.

BTW, thank you for your input in the forgotten typefaces list. I will surely take a look into it.

dr

David Rault's picture

Graham:

the original Healey from John Haddon & Co, London

> can't find any visual. it's forgotten for sure.

Goudy Catalogue & Catalogue Italic

> digitally available.

Old Style from Miller & Richard, Edinburgh and London - designed by Alexander Phemister in the 1850’s

> can't find a visual, is it so far away from Bookman?

Bernard Roman from Frederic Wesselhoeft, Ltd, London - designed by Lucian Bernard in 1924-28

> can't get a visual.

Carlton from H W Caslon & Co, London and not the ITC version

> no visual.

the original Stellar designed by Robert Hunter Middleton - its a sans, sorry Michael.

> digitally available. I have some good scans of the original sketches by Middleton, it's very close to the Linotype version and it's definitely a flare, not a sans (unless you call sans a flare, and consider optima a sans, which is not at all).

and lastly Hans Mohring’s 1928 designs for his Elegant Face series including the Outline Face - a sans family, again, sorry Michael, but you will understand.

> yes this one will be in my book.

dr

Graham McArthur's picture

David, you will find visuals if you can get hold of a copy of "Printing Types of the World" by Alfred Bastien and G J Freshwater published by Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, Ltd. But you may find it difficult as it was published in 1931.
It has visuals of all the typefaces I mentioned. It also has many more, very beautiful designs as well, but these are my favourites (it was a hard choice) and so much better than the later digitized versions. Unfortunately they are shown incomplete and not very large, most range between about 18 to 24 pt and some smaller.

If you can not find a copy in the library or second hand bookshop (well worth the effort in getting hold of a copy), then let me know and I will scan them for you.

As an aside: It may have been tied eyes last night, but I thought that I noticed some subtle differences between Exoctic 350 and Peignot. But perhaps it is just a serif equivalent of a sans 'innovation' :)

eliason's picture

this typeface’s name on this page is Exotic 350 for some obscure reasons

I suspect that comes from Bitstream's initial digitizing of the font, when the type designs were legally available but the established names were trademarked.

Here's an old email that catalogues the equivalents (Humanist 521 = Gill Sans, etc.).

will powers's picture

Thanks, Craig. I've been trying to steal some time from other chores to respond to Graham's note. The point I was tying to make was that Cassandre designed a face the foundry called Peignot. When Bitstream issued its version they called it something else, as part of their overall somewhat descriptive style of name + number. The reasoning is not obscure at all.

There may indeed be some "subtle differences" between Exotic 350 and Peignot. This invariably happens when a face is re-done by a manufacturer different than the originating foundry. It can also happen when a face is re-worked for a different technology.

Both these kinds of differences and the use of new names is all part of the type business, and has been for a long time.

powers

Graham McArthur's picture

Thanks Will. I kind of worked this out eventually after looking more closely at it. I shall pay more attention in class next time.

David Rault's picture

Graham: from where I am now, it might prove difficult to get a copy of the book you mentionned (I don't plan to go to America or England again anytime soon, and I won't find this one in Turkey or France, or Belgium or Spain, and these are the only places I will travel in the next 4 or 5 month). I would greatly appreciate a quick scan of the types you talked about.

dr

Graham McArthur's picture

No problems David. Send me an email with your preferred format and resolution: graham.mcarthur@me.com
I will scan and email back.

Typedog's picture

Graham McArthur

Where can I find this book?

Guerrizmo+Design

Graham McArthur's picture

Good question!
I got mine from a second hand bookshop many years ago. Its out of print and the Publisher does not have copies (I tried them myself). May be try ebay.

Typedog's picture

Thanks Friend! I will give it a go

Guerrizmo+Design

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