Wine Label: Kuenstler Script alternatives?

waves's picture

So, I'm starting a redesign of a boutique winery logotype, which was quickly thrown together years ago in Word using Kuenstler Script, and some Times New Roman (Windows default fonts).

The label looks terribly generic, but I'm thinking to refine the type overall and give the composition a designer's touch because the winery has some brand equity in the design.

If the timeline wasn't so crazy, I would really like to hire out the script to a calligrapher to get a totally custom and ownable logotype, I don't think I know enough about scripts to do it myself from scratch. I need some suggestions of types that look similar to Kuenstler, but are more unique and boutique than the Windows-installed font. I'm familiar with Shelley and Novia from other threads...

What do you guys think?

Manlio Napoli's picture

Something not so similar (but better): Burgues Script or Compendium by Ale Paul.

epixs's picture

I can try some custom hand lettering for your logo.
Almost every wine label of mine is with custom calligraphy - see it here:
www.behance.net/epixs

or here
http://typophile.com/node/49547#comment-309065

__________________________
www.behance.net/epixs
epixs@yahoo.com
+359887323000

acnapyx's picture

Or you could try the wonderful Memoir by Stephen Rapp. The script has quite nice natural touch and lots of alternates, and would look wonderful on a wine label.

typerror's picture

Two beautiful scripts by Fritz Poppl... Residenz and Exquisite.

http://www.myfonts.com/search?search%5Btext%5D=Poppl

Michael

waves's picture

thanks everybody! Epixs, your stuff is really nice, if we had more time, I'd consider sourcing the script out. The logotype needs to be very close to their existing, but with a little more character. I'm really liking Burgues Script for the alternates and will probably go with that, Shelley is pretty close as well.

Generally speaking, are there 'rules' with how you should design flourishes and connect letters? It seems like calligraphic lettering is more an art and there aren't necessarily hard/fast rules or a 'correct' way of going about rendering a word. I have a great Doyald Young book at home that I'll consult, are there any other resources I should refer to when tackling this logotype?

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