advice establishing The Australian Typography Club

noftus's picture

Hi,

I am a type enthusiast living in Sydney Australia, and have been frustrated by the lack of organisations and interest groups inspired by our wonderful world of typography.

Rather than get frustrated, I have decided to do something about it, and am going to establish an informal club called The Australian Typography Club. Inspired by organisations like The Typographic Circle, and Type Club of Toronto, the purpose of our club will be to promote choosing, using, and creating great typography.

The short version of this thread is that I am seeking advice and direction regarding:

  • setting up a typography club
  • knowledge of the type scene in Australasia
  • general guidance

If you can help, please read on!

==================

ABOUT ME
In the world of typography, I am just another keen user (a mere nobody). What's worse, I write quite messy (but that's another thread). I am however a very capable person, and run a publishing design studio in Sydney. I will make sure The Australian Typography Club succeeds.

ABOUT TYPE IN SYDNEY
For the past couple of months, I scoured high and low to find any sort of organisations, group, or course concerned with type. Bonus points for anything in Sydney. Results:

There is The Australia Graphic Design Association (AGDA). Many have their views on AGDA - and I have heard them being described as inaccessible or irrelevant. Most importantly, I do not believe there is a focus group concerned with typography. To be honest, I'm a little hesitant to contact these people.

There is an online community Australian INFront. This is a great online only community, with respect of typography.

Education-wise: There are the usual type subjects taught as part of tertiary courses. Various industry short courses also exist, for example run by AFTRS "Typography for the Screen". Oh dear, but this is run in Melbourne.

If you're aware of other organisations, groups or courses relating to type in Australia, please let me know!

PURPOSE OF THE CLUB
The mission of our club will be to promote choosing, using, and creating great typography.

On a day-to-day level, the purpose of the club would be to create a real-life community for type enthusiasts to meet, collaborate, and learn. Meetings would be held periodically (in my studio if needed), where Australian typography enthusiasts of all ages can discuss choosing, using, and creating great typography.

As a 27 year-old, I have a personal interest to get younger professionals / uni students involved. The type scene exists in Australia. There's a type gene in our DNA - we just have to get together.

ESTABLISHING THE CLUB
As an informal, not for profit, general interest club, I would imagine that the membership would steer it's direction over time. It however firstly needs to be established.

The following are 3 issues I would love advice with. Please help!
========================================================================

==> Issue 1 of 3: What is Australian Type?
When it comes to type, Australia is no New York or Amsterdam. Heck, we're only 220 years old. Compared to other cities, there is little historical culture. How can we define Australian Type? What is it? Is there such a thing? Where have we come from, and where are we going? Is it even important that there is such as thing as Australian type?

==> Issue 2 of 3: Attracting the right leaders
We would love to attract respected and knowledgeable type industry leaders to be involved in the club in some way. Those in Industry, type designers, foundries, educators. Who are these people in Australia?

From Industry:
Developers: I am aware of Elliot Harper, Chapter Rep of the Sydney Adobe InDesign Users Group. Also Mike McHugh, Creative Systems Engineer at Adobe - a fantastic Adobe CS trainer.

Agencies: My knowledge of type specialist in design agencies in Australia is limited. There are of course highly respected agencies like Frost Design, and others specialising specifically in type, magazine and newspaper redesign. Problem is: I am not aware of who the gurus are.

Type Designers / Foundries:
Unfortunately drawing major blanks here. Kris Sowerby of KLIM fame is from New Zealand. That's the closest I get.

Educators:
They lurk around teaching courses in places such as Billy Blue and TAFE Enmore amongst others. They know their stuff. With more homework I can find out these peoples names', but would love some help.

Attracting these people involves inviting them to contribute at meetings with talks, help set up the club, or merely come along for the ride, if they're at all interested. Remember it's about choosing, using, and creating.

==> Issue 3 of 3: Getting members to join
Get issue 2 right, and this one should be quite easy.

For industry professionals: word could spread with the right seeds planted.

For young professionals and uni students, from first hand experience I know there are plenty of young enthusiasts out there. Promoting typography to up and comers is only positive for the industry. Quite easy and effective to contact design colleges, I also hear a community announcement on FBI radio etc.

==============================================================

So all in all, I'm keen to hear any words of advice, direction, or comments about the ambition for The Australian Typography Club.

...especially in relation to the 3 issues raised, and names of people / type designers / foundries / gurus.

Is there anyone from other type clubs who also could provide advice?

Thanks for any help and advice.

*edited to expand scope to Australia (was initially Sydney based only)

Update:
A Forum has been established. Please help out if you can!

http://forums.australiantype.org/viewforum.php?f=3

James Arboghast's picture

Hi Nathan. Great idea and I'm all for it. Trouble is I live in Melbourne. I've been travelling to Sydney on PR consult jobs this year, but I'm only there for a few days at a time and it's very hard to convince my employers to let me have any time off for things like type club meetings, or anything else for that matter. Mainly I'm employed as a brand consultant, AD and writer.

There is The Australia Graphic Design Association (AGDA). Many have their views on AGDA - and I have heard them being described as inaccessible or irrelevant. Most importantly, I do not believe there is a focus group concerned with typography. To be honest, I’m a little hesitant to contact these people.

Me too. I've had some contact with AGDA in the past and found them rather inaccessible and largely inactive. Certainly they didn't express much interest in typography.

Type Designers / Foundries:
Unfortunately drawing major blanks here. Kris Sowerby of KLIM fame is from New Zealand. That’s the closest I get.

I'm one of Melbourne's indie type designers / font manufacturers. There are others here, but I've had no contact with them, largely by choice because I'm very indie and like to work on my own, figure it all out for myself. Now that I'm established I'm getting more comissions, and I may be about to sign a deal with a high-profile indie retail / custom type outfit in London, who I cannot name at this time.

One other Melbourne type designer is Graham Meade:
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/meade/graham/

I'm not sure where the following people are located:

Jan Schmoeger:
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/schmoeger/jan/

Wayne Thompson:
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/thompson/wayne/

Jesse Andrew Tilley:
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/tilley/jesse/andrew/

In Sydney there's Russell Bean:
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/bean/russell/

There's a list of Aussie type people at Myfonts:
http://www.myfonts.com/country/au/

Out of all those people, the fonts I've made appear to be the most serious as far as typographic design goes.
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/person/arboghast/james/

I'm not prolific, and the best is yet to come, but out of the two main retail fonts I released last year, all two of them made the Typographica best fonts of 2007 list. I figure that's a good sign. I'm just moving into text fonts now.

For the time being it's best if you ask me what I can do for you and your endeavor. I'm happy to talk about it here online or we can converse by email.

j a m e s

kris's picture

Type Designers / Foundries:

I thought you guys would know all about The Letterbox Foundry, run by Stephen Banham! It's certainly the first Aussie foundry I became aware of. I don't know if he lives/works in Sydney, or whether that is really an issue.

--K

James Arboghast's picture

I just came here to post a link to Stephen Banham's site. Here it is:
http://www.letterbox.net.au/

Just because I didn't mention it in my first post does not mean I didn't know about Stephen Banham. I could put an exclamation mark after that but it would be pointless. Stephen Banham lives and works in Melbourne, in case you didn't know. I first heard of him five or more years ago when he began his anti-Helvetica campaign. Letterbox is not a "foundry" by the way. It's a font making outfit.

What makes you think we did not know of Stephen Banham? Thanks man, you're all heart. Perhaps Nathan knows of Stephen Banham too but also omitted to mention him. People have reasons for omitting to mention things and it shouldn't be at all surprizing. It has to do with being human and making errors.

Have a great day Kris!

j a m e s

James Arboghast's picture

27.Nov.2007 6.58pm:
http://typophile.com/node/39505

That's the first time I mentioned Stephen Banham online.

Never judge a book by its cover.

j a m e s

kris's picture

Sorry James, I've clearly upset you. I did not mean to rile you at all.

Congrats on making the Typographica Best of 2007 list! I eagerly await you foray into text typefaces.

--K

kris's picture

Pardon my ignorance, but I've had a look at the 2007 list, and couldn't find any thing from Sentinel Type Fonts. Did you collaborate with someone?

--K

Höfe's picture

Stephen Banham has some good work, thanks for the link Kris.

Why is James so upset at you for posting it?

Is he jealous?

crossgrove's picture

Odd: I just had lunch with 2 fellows who I imagine you'll be hearing from soon. James Yencken and Jonno Bellew have a design shop called Something Splendid in Melbourne and are heading back there this weekend from the US. They attended TypeCon and I met them on the plane back to San Francisco. I'll alert them to this thread so they can respond. Best of luck. I find it so exciting to know that type and typographic groups are surfacing all over the world.

kentlew's picture

Kris -- James's Amity and Sibyl appear on the "Other Notable Releases" list at the bottom, under the Display category.

-- Kent.

James Yencken's picture

Stephen Banham has a good link with some Australian Type People on it:
http://www.letterbox.net.au/research/res_texts_tenyears.html

I was taught by Wendy Ellerton and Niko Spelbrink in Melbourne - they're both very talented and lovely people (I think with a background in Typemedia at the Hague in the NL).

James Yencken's picture

Other people I know of:

Mark Gowing is a great Sydney Designer/Typographer - http://markgowing.com/
Barry Spencer is a young guy from Melbourne with some great geometric and experimental type - http://www.barryspencerdesign.com.au/

noftus's picture

Thanks for all comments and help so far. Much appreciated.

To be more inclusive, I am considering increasing the initiative to be Australian based.

James I'll be in contact shortly.

Appreciate any further advice.

Tell's picture

Might be worth approaching the Design Institute of Australia (design.org.au).

They're far more proactive than AGDA in my experience, and include architects, industrial designers etc. You can start spreading the gospel to a much wider audience!

pat a.'s picture

I think this is a great idea.

I'm just at a student (almost done!)/junior designer level, but would love it if there were, say, regular(-ish) type-related events – panels, talks, film screenings, that sort of thing – happening around Sydney.

I was going to suggest Mark Gowing as well, but after that I'm drawing a blank for Sydney typographers (or typographically-inclined designers).

PS. Sydney typophiles might want to have a look at the current show at the UTS Gallery, which is a 10-year retrospective of Roma publications. They're also organising a screening of Helvetica for Friday, August 29 as a related event.

James Arboghast's picture

Pardon me folks. Work is just totally full-on crazy for me at the moment.

Kris—it's no big deal. Water under the bridge my friend. A common misunderstanding.

@Höfe: Why is James so upset at you for posting it?

Is he jealous?

No, nothing like that Franz. If you read thru my post again, I wasn't upset with Kris for posting the link to Stephen Banham's website, not am I jealous of Stephen or Kris in any professional sense as type designers. My only concern there was how we act as professionals on this board, that we avoid making personal remarks and reading between the lines, making assumptions and so on.

Carl—I can understand it may seem odd to you, but I don't have the monetary means to go jetsetting and attending Typecons. I'm no businessman either, just a consultant for hire. I've got health issues and can't even work as many hours as I would like to, so life is pretty tough for me. Just keeping my day job going is a struggle. Establishing and running a type business as James Yencken and Jonno Bellew have done is not possible for me. Anyway I'm still sight impaired from my double cerebral anerysm last year and that reduces my capacity to work. I nearly died and haven't been the same since.

Nathan I look forward to hearing from you : ^ )
As you can see I'm rather out of touch with what's happening in Oz. Mainly that's due to concentrating on the international type community.

j a m e s

James Yencken's picture

Type business! I wish! We're just regular old (young) designers with a taste for typography.

I highly highly recommend Typecon - we happened to be in the US on business and got away for a week for the conference this year. So amazing, so inspiring, and so much fun. I'm already saving my pennies for next year.

Also need to include David Pidgeon from Melbourne - http://www.pidgeon.com.au/
Chase & Galley from Melbourne are marvellous typographers also - http://www.chaseandgalley.com

I wouldn't jump right on the AGDA hate bandwagon fellas. (full disclosure - I just joined a few months ago) They put on some good events and the people in charge in Melbourne are a young progressive bunch. They would almost definitely support any kind of type initiative; but everyone involved in AGDA is also a busy designer with limited time.

kris's picture

Speaking of type events, we're having one here in Wellington, NZ. You guys would just need to nip over the ditch! Some really good speakers have already been announced.

TypeSHED11

--K

James Yencken's picture

Looks like I'm saving for two type conferences next year!

James Arboghast's picture

@James Yencken: I highly highly recommend Typecon - we happened to be in the US on business and got away for a week for the conference this year. So amazing, so inspiring, and so much fun. I’m already saving my pennies for next year.

Typecon is a type trade show where (this year for instance) 400 of the 470 attendees were there to flog their wares. A certain amount of commercialization is neccessary to support industry conferences, but still I find it hard to get enthusiastic about paying $350 (add a few grand in airfares and accomodation on top of that) to go to a convention where more than half the presentations are of no consequence or interest to me, and where most people are consuming alcohol. That turns me off, because I don't drink. I'm a smoker and I'm damn proud of it. The other problem for me with Typecon is I'm no type nerd. I'm an artist and a writer.

Notwithstanding, I think Typecon is great for the people who like and enjoy that kind of thing, and I wish SOTA and the Typecon people all the best in future gatherings. Everything has its place in this world. I don't dislike Typecon nor am I anti-Typecon or anti-Type nerd. It just isn't for me.

At least I don't think it is, but I would very much love to be convinced otherwize. Typophiles you are most welcome to turn me around on this. Convince me. Tell me why I should go.

But enuff sour grapes. It's telling that James Yencken, a designer, knows of other designers interested in typography as well as actual type designers in Melbourne. I'm out of touch with the design scene since I mainly work in public relations, as a writer of business collateral, creative concepts for ads and some corporate branding. I have kept my interest in type going however by forging a career as a typeface designer and font maker. That's not well supported by my daytime contract work, but I guess I can't have everything.

I wouldn’t jump right on the AGDA hate bandwagon fellas.

I appreciate what you are saying there, but your choice of words has a polarizing effect. Leave out "hate" and "bandwagon" please. "Hate" is a dangerous corrosive word and we're all better off not using it. It has a corrosive effect.

The opinion I expressed of ADGA earlier is based on contact I made with them and their utter lack of responsiveness. They didn't return my any of my calls or emails, and I made quite a few of them. I am very professional in my business correspondence, much more professional than you may see me from time to time in online discussions at Typophile. I made the effort to establish repore with ADGA repeatedly and got nothing in return, not one word, not one call back. What else am I supposed to make of that?

They put on some good events and the people in charge in Melbourne are a young progressive bunch.

Good for them and I wish them all the best with their endeavors. Sorry, but in my estimation they have a colossal amount to learn about professionalism and how to communicate.

They would almost definitely support any kind of type initiative; but everyone involved in AGDA is also a busy designer with limited time.

I think you should speak for yourself, and let them speak for themselves. And James, please take all of what I'm saying in good faith as it's meant that way.

@Pat Armstrong: PS. Sydney typophiles might want to have a look at the current show at the UTS Gallery, which is a 10-year retrospective of Roma publications. They’re also organising a screening of Helvetica for Friday, August 29 as a related event.

The UTS Gallery show sounds interesting. Thanks for the link Pat : ^ )

I watched the Helvetica film for the first time on DVD in my hotel room a few weeks ago when in Sydney. It was the most boring documentary I've ever seen. Nothing in it about Helvetica I didn't already know. It's a boring font and a boring subject. The only interesting person in Helvetica is David Carson.

j a m e s

James Yencken's picture

I'd also highly recommend the UTS Roma Publications Show - it was curated by Warren Taylor (another great Melbourne designer interested in type) who runs a great design/art gallery in Melbourne - http://thenarrows.org/

The Narrows hosted an Experimental Jetset Poster exhibition last year to coincide with the Melbourne screening of Helvetica. http://thenarrows.org/archive/1/jetset/1.html

James Yencken's picture

Also - just re-reading James' post near the top. I never realized Jan Schmoeger was a type designer! Wow! He taught me Indesign at University years ago and never mentioned his type skills. http://www.paragraph.com.au/

Zennie's picture

Hi Nathan

I love the idea of an Australian Typography Club.

I am a designer who is interested in type, also in Melbourne, but would get involved with online or local events.

Zennie

Graham McArthur's picture

I am from Adelaide, and know a few people here who would also be interested an Australian Typography Club provided it was truly national.

James Yencken's picture

I imagine that the physical location of any events would be a scandalous and resented topic no matter where it is held. An online component of the club would be necessary to make it truly national.

Off the top of my head it would need:
- a blog
- a directory of Australian Type Designers and Typographers
- collaborative projects of some description

Graham McArthur's picture

It all sounds good to me. let the games begin!

gemma's picture

This is a fantastic idea. I am a typomaniac (www.fortheloveoftype.blogspot.com) living in Sydney also:-)

The Roma publications exhibition at UTS is great.

At the College of Fine Arts (UNSW) in Paddington there are typography courses as part of the Bachelor of Design and the Bachelor of Digital Media program. There is also a lovely letterpress studio which is starting to be used in parts of these courses...as well as a very talented lecturer/tutor who is currently writing his thesis about the history of Australian typography and printing.

Can't wait to hear more.

David Sudweeks's picture

And the name of the organization shall be:
The Australian Typographic Board
Now that is a good name.

pat a.'s picture

seconded!
everyone gets matching suits.

kegler's picture

"The other problem for me with Typecon is I’m no type nerd. I’m an artist and a writer."

Yes, there is a strict policy against having anyone who is not drunk in a Helvetica T-shirt and horn-rimmed glasses attend TypeCon. On the other hand, if you have been to one, you could be in a better position to cast opinions & generalizations. A few artists & writers have even presented and had a good time.

kegler's picture

Granted it is expensive to travel half way around the world and my reason for having never visited "The Antipodes" is mainly financial. Hopefully circumstances will allow for both of us to be more global in our future endeavors.

noftus's picture

Thankyou for the information.

It's very pleasing to hear support and enthusiasm that I've sensed is out there.

Update:
There is a plan being formulated. I'm in the process of aggregating all information, and need to make a few phone calls. Alas, work is getting in the way.

Phase 1: Establishing The Type Club
- pre general membership phase
- attracting the right stakeholders: type designers, supporters
- penciling an initial mission/charter/purpose
- establishing what 'membership' is
- thinking about real-life events

Phase 2: Attracting Membership

Phase 3: Organising the first event(s)

Early thoughts on Membership:
- goes without saying that this is a not-for-profit club
- target base: design professionals, design students, enthusiasts, type designers, educators, academics
- membership is free for type designers, students, academics
- $20/pa design professionals and general enthusiasts
- hard to draw a line I understand

- Membership gets you:
--- the Australian Typography Yearbook posted to you annually, which showcases the best of Australian type. Type designers contribute and showcase their work here. (I am a publisher and can produce the yearbook cheap but nice.)
--- admission to type events
--- other stuff (provided by supporters)
--- tshirt? (may need to bump up membership), but need to keep it down too

A website link will be published on this thread when the time is right, where others can help with Phase 1, and become part of the core founders. There's no way I can do this on my own. ETA: 1 week.

Keen to hear any other opinions, thoughts + advice. Thanks!

Barry Spencer's picture

Late to the game!

This sounds great.

I can't wait to see what happens.

Professor Anthony Cahalan - Dean of the Faculty of Arts at Charles Sturt University would be a good person to talk to about type.

Some other places to look are:

http://thefoundry.com.au/

http://www.100types.com/

http://nevolution.typepad.com/

Keep me posted.

Cheers,
Barry.

nev's picture

Thanks for the post up Barry.

I would most definitely be interested in something like this. I've long had an interest in defining australian type, and a society like this would be great to pool ideas and help some long lost inertia get back to speed. I've had plans for a type family that deals with a distinctively aussie flavour for too long now.

Would love to see this come into fruition somehow.

nev's picture

Just plugged it on my blog, never hurts to get the odd extra committed eyeball.

http://nevolution.typepad.com/theories/2008/08/milk-bar-jibber.html

James Arboghast's picture

@Richard: Yes, there is a strict policy against having anyone who is not drunk in a Helvetica T-shirt and horn-rimmed glasses attend TypeCon. On the other hand, if you have been to one, you could be in a better position to cast opinions & generalizations.

Fine. At this stage all I have to go on is what people say about Typecon and what I can see in photos of the event each year. Obviously attending one in person will make the picture much clearer for me. I'm sorry I generalized, but that is human nature. As for my opinions, well, I am not sorry for having opinions based on observation from a distance. Fact—people tell me Typecon is packed with nerds. That isn't my opinion, it's what people tell me, including people who have been to Typecon.

What else am I supposed to think? At least I'm thoughtful enuff to come here and test this generalization, the reason being I don't want to believe it either : ^ )

The point about alcohol consumption is that I should feel comfortable in a social context, and it is a bit hard to feel comfortable if I'm one of the few people not drinking. Is that reasonable?

j a m e s

James Arboghast's picture

The quickest way to get this off the ground will be to establish a website with blog / wiki. I'm very keen to help with that stuff.

@Nathan
Agencies: My knowledge of type specialist in design agencies in Sydney is limited. There are of course highly respected agencies like Frost Design, and others specialising specifically in type, magazine and newspaper redesign. Problem is: I am not aware of who the gurus are.

What baffles me is why so few of Australia's type specialists or gurus show up at Typophile. Typophile can seem bewildering, elitist, even offputting at times, depending on the topic being discussed. But it's an international community with a lot to offer, and to be part of it you have to roll with the punches and take a tolerant, long-term view. You (Nathan) and other Aussies have done that. You made the effort and now you're getting something really great in return. I've had my darker moments and occasional loss of faith, but in the end I stuck with Typophile. I'm still here.

So where are Australia's big shot type people? Why aren't they Typophilers? This curious dearth of Australian presence puzzles me.

The Sydney Typography Club

Is it going to be named that, or The Australian Typography Club, or The Australian Typographic Board as David Sudweeks is suggesting, or something else? Irrespective of where meetings and events are held and where the organization is headquartered, naming it The Australian Typography Club (or something similar) will go a long way towards securing membership from every state. I saw the *edited to expand scope to Australia bit, so does that mean we can substitute each instance (or most instances) of "Sydney" with "Australia"?

One thing I'm not into is the notion of Melbourne as Australia's culture capital. Currently I don't subscribe to that view, even tho I unwittingly repeated the myth several years ago on the page about me at Planet Typographie. Sydney is a very cultured place, no less so than Melbourne, just different. I hope you and other interested parties in Sydney can see beyond the Sydney versus Melbourne thing too, because it's a load of bunk with the potential to derail a national type society.

j a m e s

James Arboghast's picture

@Nathan: James I’ll be in contact shortly.

You said that 8 days ago, and I still haven't heard from you by email. You're note contactable via the Typophile User Page interface, so, how do I contact you?

I know I can seem like a mouthy, moralizing, overbearing, cranky kind of guy at times, but in real life I'm much more reasonable and well-adjusted. I come out looking like a cartoon caricature online. That happens to most people I think. Just take Richard Kegler for example. He can be quite sardonic at times online here at Typophile, but I know the man offline and he really is a great guy.

It's the spirit of what I say that counts, not the letter. Yada yada yada, you all know the drill by now. Take it in good faith.

j a m e s

James Arboghast's picture

@Richard: Granted it is expensive to travel half way around the world and my reason for having never visited “The Antipodes” is mainly financial. Hopefully circumstances will allow for both of us to be more global in our future endeavors.

If you can put some of your highly attractive and not-easily-dismissed font wares behind the stunning new market for web fonts Richard, the potential to make more money in our wretched business is there. I'm working towards the same, and you are one American type person I'm most looking forward to meeting : ^ )

j a m e s

crossgrove's picture

There's something to look forward to: The first Australian type conference. The Letras Latinas Bienal, Kitabat, Thessaloniki, TypeShed in Wellington, and next year's ATypI in Mexico City make the type world look bigger, more interesting and more diverse. Though it's just getting more challenging to consider attending overseas events, it's a very attractive idea to visit Australia, Mexico or Buenos Aires for a type conference.

noftus's picture

Sorry, as I said in a previous post, my day job is getting in the way. Sorry I haven't had a chance to call - also haven't had a chance to replace "Sydney" with "Australian" in the original post.

A website + forum engine has been set up, but these things take time to be 'releasable' (especially with a full on day job). I don't want to release anything prematurely - but thanks for your patience - it will be worth the wait.

In the meantime though, I've spoken to a lot of professionals in other fields about societies and clubs which succeed. I'd just like to reiterate that ego, politics and bullsh** should try to be minimised, otherwise there's no point in us making the effort.

blank's picture

…it’s a very attractive idea to visit Australia, Mexico or Buenos Aires for a type conference.

Yeah, but that this rate Americans won’t even be able to afford Mexico much longer.

noftus's picture

Update: things are moving.

A forum has been set up - if you're interested in helping out, please join and contribute. Thankyou.

http://forums.australiantype.org/viewforum.php?f=3

James I have also sent you 2 e-mails. It wasn't possible to stalk your phone number off the net :)

Graham McArthur's picture

There are now two of us registered in the forum. I am happy to help out in some way. It will be interesting to see what develops over the next few days.

James Arboghast's picture

Thanks Graham. I've just emailed the Aussies who are contactable from Typophile to remind them to register at the forum Nathan has set up. But a few Aussies on this thread aren't contactable from Typophile, so could those people please go to the forum and register. Thanks!

We need you to actually do it. That is, actually join the project by registering at the forum, otherwise this isn't going to happen. Registration is simple and only takes a few minutes.

Here's the link again:
http://forums.australiantype.org

j a m e s

Simon Robertson's picture

hey, i'm a designer in melbourne, this sounds great!

James Arboghast's picture

Hey Simon : ^ ) I've seen you around. Thanks for coming along. I'm about to post a logo critique in the critique forum and would dearly appreciate feedback and help with that one.

What kind of design work do you do?

j a m e s

Simon Robertson's picture

hi james, i'm an in-house designer for The Salvation Army in melbourne, so i create graphics for everything from conference material to training manuals to logo's to banners to book... it's quite broad. i'm also teaching myself type design and lucky for me my work is supporting it, so i get to spend a few hours each week on type design. i'm quite lucky. cheers

Miss Tiffany's picture

( James, there are plenty of us non-drinkers at TypeCon. It is a shame that you feel that way. )

David Sudweeks's picture

←orders water at TypeCon.

Nick Shinn's picture

Free memberships, not a good idea.
A good revenue model is fundamental for longevity, especially after the initial enthusiasm of volunteers wears out.

I would recommend either an autocracy or anarchy.
The alternative will be to spend forever in board meetings.

***

Our club:
http://www.typeclub.com

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