>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.4 - Intermediate Level

Bald Condensed's picture

This is how it works:

  • A complete glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the typeface. To win, you need to name both the typeface and the weight.
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge -- a complete glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 x 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can't win the next game.

In case of any disputes, I will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz first. Too easy? Go to the Expert Level Type ID Pop Quiz.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

riccard0's picture

Carousel is so close...

nina's picture

Hey, might this be the [pound sign from Tom Carnase's] elusive ITC Didi?
The font is sometimes referred to as pre-digital, but there seems to have been an Image Club version which however isn't available anymore.

Florian Hardwig's picture

I assume John (JL) was thinking of Gary Gillot’s Carousel, too. But that’s not it.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Tom Carnase: ✓
Pound sign: ✓
Elusive: ✓
ITC: ✓
Didi: Nope, sorry.

Do you want to see another glyph?

Jan's picture

I checked everything by Carnase I could think of and didn’t find it. Hm.

nina's picture

:-\

I don't know if another glyph would help, since I already can't find this one for the life of me, but yes please :-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

I’m sorry for having ruined your Sunday noon … :D

Like ITC Didi, this font is not available at the moment. Still, there is a digital version of it. And it has popped up on the Type ID Board several times. I find its lowercase quite wobbly. Here’s my favourite glyph:

nina's picture

Slightly more verbose reply:
Firenze, designed by Tom Carnase for ITC in 1970.
Link to entire alphabet

Florian Hardwig's picture


100% correct! It’s Firenze. To answer the cryptic first hint: 1970 is the year that Ross Mills (designer of Plantagenet) and Alejandro Lo Celso (Rayuela) were born.
Your turn!

Jan's picture

Damn. Why didn’t I just say Firenze? Couldn’t find a complete specimen so I didn’t dare. Stupid me.

nina's picture

Thank you, Florian – how lovely :-)

Here's the new glyph:

barthak's picture

Pivo by František Štorm! :^)

nina's picture

Oh man, now I didn't even get to use my "more beer!!!" hint.

Your turn! :-)

barthak's picture

Sorry ‘bout that, I was so surprised I found it that I couldn't wait ;-)

New one comming up soon.

barthak's picture

Here you go. Good luck!

barthak's picture

Chances are this font is already installed on your computer.

Nick Cooke's picture

Three wheels on my wagon and I'm still rollin' along...

Nick Cooke

barthak's picture

Haha, that's great! Not being American I never heard that song before.

BTW pretty Hi-larious looking glyph isn't it?

Nick Cooke's picture

I'm not either, but I have. Yup, pretty strange but I like it.

Nick Cooke

barthak's picture

This font -- which comes with OSX and Windows Vista -- is part of a much larger typeface with an extensive language support for basic Latin -- which this one also has -- as well as Greek, most European laguages and many ( other ) North American Native languages.


The Latin is based on Baskerville and Fournier, which I'm not going to post because of WhatTheFont ;-)

eliason's picture

Oh, its the 'hi' from Tiro Typeworks' Plantagenet Cherokee.

barthak's picture

"Three wheels on my wagon, And I’m still rolling along, The Cherokees are chasing me, Arrows fly, right on by, But I’m singing a happy song."

Hi, yes it's Plantagenet Cherokee!

That wasn't so hard, was it? ;-)

eliason's picture

And I should have gotten it sooner because someone just posted that alphabet to my current critique thread.

I think this one might be easy:

eliason's picture

Yup, it's Snicker by St. Paul, Minnesota's (and Typophile's) own Mark Simonson. It was inspired by lettering he spotted in an old Superman cartoon series.

Your turn plumbago!

plumbago's picture

Here we go!

Have fun!

John Lyttle's picture

Looks a bit like the g in this sketch by a certain Londoner type designer.

Jan's picture

London type designer. Jonathan Hughes?

John Lyttle's picture

Popgod by Rian Hughes, I believe. He was featured in this newsletter, which is where I found his sketch – not for this type but for a logo that he had been working on.

Jan's picture

Oh yeah. Rian Hughes is who I was thinking of. And I think you nailed it!

John Lyttle's picture

Do you think I should I wait for Marcelo to confirm? I've got a new glyph ready to roll.

plumbago's picture

You guys have been busy!

Well done John! it's Popgod by Rian Hughes. Go ahead.

John Lyttle's picture

OK, then. I'm just using a "2" because it's my second time up to bat here. It's not a hint.

John Lyttle's picture

Here's some biographical info on the type designer: "Se graduó en Diseño Gráfico en la Temple University Tyler School of Art en Filadelfia en 1994."

It was easier to find this info in Spanish than in English. Anyway, that's my two bits' worth of hinting for now.

eliason's picture

It's Holiday Script from House Industries.

John Lyttle's picture

You got it, Craig. The type designer of Holiday Script is Ken Barber.
Shave and a haircut: two bits. Haircut. Barber. That was my groaner of a clue.
Your turn . . .

eliason's picture

Here's one for you:

John Lyttle's picture

I posted the last challenge, so I'm not supposed to win this one.
But as I look at that f and think of its designer, I can't help hum a little song from the ’80s . . .

nina's picture

Oh, that was too good a hint!

It's ITC Mixage, designed by Aldo Novarese in 1985. Medium weight.

I won't pretend I'm not copy-pasting this from the Linotype site: "Mixage font is the work of Italian designer Aldo Novarese, who cleverly combined the character shapes and proportions like those of Syntax and Antique Olive with the grace and warmth of a calligraphic typeface. Mixage font is a good alternative to more traditional sans serif designs."

eliason's picture

Bingo! You're up, Nina.

nina's picture

Whee!
Here you are, guys:

nina's picture

O, I guess it wasn't too easy then…
This is a basic Latin character, FWIW. But an alternate glyph in this font.

John Lyttle's picture

My tendency appears to be making things too easy. You don't suffer from that habit, do you, Nina? Can you give us a little hint about this curious glyph?

nina's picture

Oops, sorry, I forgot I was still wearing this hat!
Hint… hm…
The standard glyph for this character in this font has no crossbar. Think about it.

nina's picture

Almost: "X". :-)
(All the UC characters in this font have stylistic alternates; the lc doesn't.)

Jan's picture

Ha! Found it. It’s the alternate ‘X’ in Kaas by Hugo d’Alte.

nina's picture

You nailed it Jan! Kickass font BTW. :-)

Your turn!

eliason's picture

Kaas?! That would be another confusing one for Cheese or Font.

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