>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.4 - Intermediate Level

Bald Condensed's picture

This is how it works:

  • A complete glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the typeface. To win, you need to name both the typeface and the weight.
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge -- a complete glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 x 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can't win the next game.

In case of any disputes, I will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz first. Too easy? Go to the Expert Level Type ID Pop Quiz.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

all about seb's picture

Thought it might be Candice, but it is Motter Femina's Latin Small Letter F With Hook (is there a better name for this character?).
Designed by Othmar Motter and exists in one weight only.

Bald Condensed's picture

That's the discontinued Dutch monetary sign called 'florin'. It's gone the way of the dodo since the Euro finally took over in 2002.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hej Seb,
absolutely right! :)
Nothing to add but a link to a thread about the florin: http://www.typophile.com/node/13226
Your turn!
F

all about seb's picture

Okay, here you go. One of my personal favourites:

tearsforsappho's picture

Could this be Mixage EF Black by Elsner & Flake?

all about seb's picture

Dear Katelynn,

right on - it's the subtle 'Q' of ITC Mixage Black designed by Aldo Novarese.
Guess that makes it your turn. Have fun!

Seb

tearsforsappho's picture

Well, I was gosh darn close! Now to find a good one for the next challenge...

tearsforsappho's picture

Well guys, here is the new one. Being a newbie here, I had a hard time deciding how obscure to be with this, so I hope I didnt make it too easy. I suppose I shall soon find out.

tearsforsappho's picture

Hmm. A clue perhaps?

The roman of this font (this is the italic, book italic rather) was a 90's revision of the work of Lucian Bernhard.

I lovelovelove this font.

tearsforsappho's picture

Right on! Perhaps because my name starts with "k", I am partial to fonts with an interesting "k". Vibertus is next on my purchase list for this very reason. Your go!

plumbago's picture

Thanks, Katelynn.
Here we go:

Have fun!

all about seb's picture

Marcelo, how about a little hint?

plumbago's picture

Yes, yes , my bad.

The designer died ten years ago.

all about seb's picture

Ah thanks! So this must be the nice 'ffi' ligature in Phill Grimshaw's ITC Klepto.

plumbago's picture

You're right! it's Klepto by Phill Grimshaw but in fact, is the ‘ffl’ ligature ;-)

Your turn, seb.

all about seb's picture

Okay, und noch einmal!

naoiseo's picture

This made my day, some days it just comes to you! Seb I believe this is FF Zapata Black by Erik van Blokland. Released in 1997.

all about seb's picture

Well Naoise, you are spot on! It surely is a beautiful face, just begging for an opportunity to show itself.

...and glad I could help in improving your day, it's your turn now and I am looking forward to it.

naoiseo's picture

Ich bin dran! Lets stick with the Deutsch. I give you the lowercase 'a' from from a typeface I love.

naoiseo's picture

Good man Seány, du bist dran!

tikitown40's picture

hello, i'd love to know which type this is!
can anybody name it?
thank you

Lex Kominek's picture

Start a new thread, tikitown.

- Lex

smongey's picture

It is indeed, congrats!

akira1975's picture

Thank you!
And this is the new one. Here we go.

all about seb's picture

It's Eli Castellanos' delightful Barricada published through Sudtipos.

akira1975's picture

Yes, Sebastian, you’re right. It’s Barricada.
Your turn now.

all about seb's picture

Hurrah! So here it is.

all about seb's picture

Seems like it is time for a little hint. This is the section sign from a typeface that was among the winners of the 2003 Type Directors Club Competition.

all about seb's picture

Well done, Craig! Now it's your turn.

eliason's picture

Hint: a 1930s design, redrawn by ITC.

all about seb's picture

An incredible smile... but I really don't have a new challenge ;)

eliason's picture

Is this small-x-height font just a ♬ cold and lonely, lovely work of art ♪ for the rest of you?

eliason's picture

Bingo, smongey! You're up again.

smongey's picture

Thanks Craig,

I guess I'll get straight to the point!

smongey's picture

The hint was in my initial comment.

smongey's picture

Afraid not?

This typeface was designed in 2003 and then got a facelift in 2006. I can also say that it has 7 weights with small caps and italics complementing each weight.

robbiefa's picture

Apex New... That d really threw me off Sean!

smongey's picture

Well done!

Perhaps this one was a little abstract. It took a good while to crack.

Sorry for holding things up.

robbiefa's picture

Yeah but you gave a nice clue at the start... Straight to the point haha! :) seems obvious now!

robbiefa's picture

Sorry for the delay, I was in Amsterdam for the weekend and couldn't put up an image!

smongey's picture

Lineto's Number Two

Eh… Just realised I can win this one. So what now?

smongey's picture

*sorry, meant to say I can't win this one.

robbiefa's picture

You just destroyed my fun! Thanks Sean! haha!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hey Robert,
do you like to start another challenge?
Thanks,
F

plumbago's picture

Rooobeeert, where are you‽

robbiefa's picture

Hey Guys, sorry I was away trying to get a job… Ha! I thought Sean would have just stuck up another one! I'll put up another one now sorry… Oh while I'm here anyone need a graphic designer! ha!

robbiefa's picture

I hope this will be a nice simple one to make up for my absence! I'm sorry again!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Robbie,

is it the G of Fontbureau’s Hermes, the more rational variant of Heinz Hoffmann’s Block?

Good luck with finding a nice job!
F

robbiefa's picture

Spot on Florian, as always! I told you this was a nice easy one! your turn!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yay! :-D
Okeee, let’s see how long this one will take you. No hints for now.
Have fun!

robbiefa's picture

Vector illustrations don't count...

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hehe … :-D
Not a vector illustration. Not a free font.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Tiffany,
lowercase: yes, ‘i’: no.
F

tearsforsappho's picture

Somehow, this reminds me of a strange blackletter lowercase "e".

Florian Hardwig's picture

Not a blackletter font, not an ‘e’.

The letter is from the Italics – which are part of a large (and growing) family.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Not a ‘z’ either, sorry.

This typeface family is made in the Netherlands.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Craig,
no, not a dotless ‘i’.

This letter is not made for the Netherlands.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Way less obscure, believe me! :^D

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Katharina,
not an ‘x’, sorry.

Quite a number of fellow typophiles might have become acquainted with this character only two weeks ago (though not with this very glyph, necessarily).

Florian Hardwig's picture

That’s right! It’s an Cyrillic lowercase letter Ge (or Ghe), italic style: г

Now you only have to hunt down the grand typeface! :—)

plumbago's picture

In some way, it reminds me of Darden's Freight Display or Big but I really don't know if there is a cyrillic version of it :(

Florian Hardwig's picture

Not Freight. But you are right, it is a display cut of a greater family that started out with regular cuts for text sizes. The typeface in question is even younger than Freight.

Come on now, folks! I know there are a lot of type designers in the Netherlands – but not all of them do Cyrillics, do they?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, Marcelo! It is Greta Grande (Bold Italic) by Peter Biľak and Nikola Djurek, from Typotheque in The Hague. The Cyrillics were designed by Alexei Kassian and Gayaneh Bagdasaryan.

The four weights are intended for large headlines (above 30pt), and therefore are designed with extreme contrast between the thick and thin, tight spacing and refined details.typotheque.com

The next addition to the Greta family will be a Greta Mono.

Your turn!

plumbago's picture

Great!
Here it is:

mark eikema's picture

I don't get the enormous inktrap for a displayfont like this... It looks like something of Underware, but it isn't.

edit: You are right I think..

150watt.net

plumbago's picture

You are right Akira!

Your turn :-)

akira1975's picture

Thank you. ;^)

Here is the next one:


Have fun!

robbiefa's picture

Hi Akira, is this MVB Sirenne Eighteen designed by Alan Dague-Greene?

akira1975's picture

Hi Robert,
You are correct. It’s the lowercase ‘s’ of MVB Sirenne Display 18 Roman designed by Alan Greene. It was fast. Congrats!

Your turn now.

robbiefa's picture

Thanks Akira,
I'm hoping this will last a little longer then my previous post.
I know it won't!!, enjoy.

robbiefa's picture

Ok i think this one is due a clue. This typeface was released in July of 2008 but was designed as a text face for one specific book. It was originally designed as a round mono typeface.

Berg's picture

T-Star by Michael Mischler?

robbiefa's picture

Good one Berg, T-Star Pro was originally designed by Mika Mischler as the text face for the book Los Logos.

Your turn Berg!

Jan's picture

Hm. In my copy of Los Logos the captions are set in T-Star Mono alright, but the text font isn’t T-Star (but Corporate S, I’d say).

robbiefa's picture

I don't have Los I do have Tres Logos and your right the text isn't set in T-Star only the Index.

So T-Star mono round – was originally designed for the index/caption face of the book Los Logos.

Berg's picture

And now the next one

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Irène,

that looks like the lowercase ‘s’ from Democratica, designed by Miles Newlyn – the font that looks like Letraset letters in the sun.
F

Berg's picture

Yes Florian, you are right. Your turn now!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hooray!

Here’s the next challenge. Have fun!

Florian Hardwig's picture

First hint:
It is one of the most widespread typefaces , I guess. Furthermore, this very font enjoys wide distribution aswell.

Berg's picture

Nice challenge! But I can’t give the answer.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Be patient, Irène! :-)
Here’s the next little hint:
The glyph is from the bold weight. The regular weight doesn’t have those ‘N’ swashes on this glyph.

barthak's picture

That looks very Zapfy, so it must be Palatino Bold ;-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Bart,

yes, that is correct; Palatino by Hermann Zapf!
This sample is taken from the Palatino Linotype OpenType version that ships with Microsoft Windows. It comes with a substantial character set, including Greek and Cyrillic, small caps, ligatures and various figures & fractions … and this glyph, the Numero sign (№).
Note the differing design decisions, across the styles. Also interesting: the inconsistent treatment of the serifs and the contrast axis (the letter ‘N’ and the masculine ordinal indicator ‘º’ are shown for comparison below):

Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic

Now it’s your turn!

barthak's picture

Hi Florian,

nice info! I wonder why Hermann decided as such.

New challenge coming up! I'm not that much of a type guru, but I'll see what I can do :-)

barthak's picture

Here it is!

Apparently, one of the designers originated in Industrial Design and developed an interest in typography, like me! ;-)

barthak's picture

Your thinking is correct ;-)

Take it away!

plumbago's picture

Thanks!

Here is the next one:

Have fun!

barthak's picture

Ooh, I know this one, but I'm not allowed to say anything :'-(

plumbago's picture

What would Hercule Poirot say if he sees a mysterious clue written with this typeface?

plumbago's picture

Well… the name of the font is certainly french but the foundry is from the U.S.

plumbago's picture

Yes Akira! you are correct. The phrase sacre bleu! or sacrebleu!, has been popularized by Agatha Christie's Belgian hero Hercule Poirot.
Joshua Lurie-Terrell from Typographica, chose MVB Sacre Bleu as one of the best typefaces of 2007.

Your turn, Akira!

akira1975's picture

Thank you, Marcelo. :)

Here is the next one:

akira1975's picture

Another glyph of the same font:

akira1975's picture

Another hint:

The designer was involved in a work of a font from House Industries. While the original drawing of the font was from another person, the designer drew the Central European characters and ligatures and defined the spacing and kerning.

akira1975's picture

Yes! Bart, you’re right.
It’s Rumba Small designed by Laura Meseguer. She designed Rumba, which is her final project for the postgraduate course that she took at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in The Hague KABK, in Holland.
And she drew the CE characters and ligatures of Holiday Sans and defined the spacing and kerning of it.

Well done. Your turn now.

barthak's picture

Great!

Here it is:

barthak's picture

I'll post another glyph on monday.

For now I'll say that the serifs remind me of a type of stone used on small roads in the country of the type foundry where this font is published.

barthak's picture

Same font, other glyph:

barthak's picture

The designer is Dutch and also attended the post-graduate course Type and Media at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague - and is a member here on Typophile.

Jan's picture

Hi Bart,
it’s Parry Normal from OurType, designed by Artur Schmal.

barthak's picture

Well done Jan, you are correct!

Your turn :)

Jan's picture

New challenge up:

Florian Hardwig's picture

Could this be the work of a fellow typophile?

Jan's picture

Oh no. Florian again.
Has just been waiting for me to come up with a challenge ;-)

Yes. Fellow typophile indeed.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Well …
is it Preface – the curvaceous sans by Nick Shinn that does without diagonals?
;-)

Jan's picture

... more or less without diagonals – yes.

Absolutely correct, Florian.

The only thing I don’t like about it is the round cap ‘E’.
Looks too much like ‘€’ for my taste.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Thanks!
Here’s the new one:

nina's picture

That might just be the Small Cap letter Q from Aller Display, out of the Aller Sans family designed by Dalton Maag for DMJX, which is free to download at their site.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Wow, Nina, that was a fast one! :D
Absolutely correct. Congratulations, it’s your turn!

nina's picture

Thanks, Florian! :) I was lucky, I just looked at this specimen a few days ago.

So, here's a new one. I hope it's neither too easy nor too obscure :)

nina's picture

Hmm, maybe time for a little hint, I'm beginning to think this may have been a really obscure one. So, the font in question was designed by somebody with whom I share part of my name. And this glyph actually appears in the name of the font.

Jan's picture

Ha! Found it.
It’s the tz-ligature from Mein Schatz, designed by Nina Hons.

nina's picture

Wow … that was quick :)
Congrats. That's extremely correct, except that the weight is missing – but I'll assume you'd spot that anyway ;). Your turn!

Jan's picture

New challenge up:

Florian Hardwig's picture

Huhu Jan! :D
Could this be the bold italic ‘y’ from Veronika Burian’s beautiful Maiola?
F

Jan's picture

Aaaargh ... FLORIAN. Yyessssss. Corrrrrrect.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Well, what can I say? Sorry Jan! ;^)
I have purchased Maiola earlier this year, so the challenge was not that hard.

Here’s the new one:

Florian Hardwig's picture

You might already have guessed it:
This glpyh is not a trebuchet on wheels, but rather a per mille sign (‰).

Florian Hardwig's picture

No guesses? This is from a 4-styles type family with a wide language support, including Greek and Cyrillic script.

Florian Hardwig's picture

There’s a certain reason why this per mille sign looks different from others

nina's picture

Yeah, it looks pretty funny. :) Is it from a monospaced font?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, Nina, that’s correct!
Here’s another glyph from this font. Same style, smaller scale:

eliason's picture

Is this a Luc de Groot font?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes! Now let’s swap quizes! :D

nina's picture

Ha! It's the per mille sign from Consolas Regular, designed by Luc(as) de Groot for Microsoft. Am I late?

EDIT: Italic of course, not Regular. Ouch.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, Nina, 1000‰ correct! Sorry Craig, you’re too late …
It is Consolas, ‘the de facto successor of the ubiquitous Courier’. The second glyph is a long s (ſ), as you might have guessed. I don’t know if there’s a frequent need for that character in programming, but ‘all six Western typefaces in the [ClearType] collection were to be developed […] with the same robust glyph set for all’ — LucasFonts.

Did you know that Consolas comes with a number of alternates for some lowercase characters? There are no less than four variations on the ‘r’ – per style, that is. Switching those alternative forms on can change the look of the typeface quite dramatically – which reminded me of Hypatia Sans, and Nick Shinn’s thoughts about its manifold faces. Alas, unlike Hypatia Sans, Consolas’ alternates aren’t organized via stylistic subsets, thus toggling them is more difficult.

Now it’s your turn, Nina!

nina's picture

Yes, Nina, 1000‰ correct!
Haha. Cool!

Did you know that Consolas comes with a number of alternates for some lowercase characters?
Wow. I didn't know that, although I guess something like that is bound to happen when Luc(as) 'Gazillions Of Weights' de Groot is limited to four styles only. ;-) That alternate 'r' in your lower line is pretty, uh, expressive for Consolas!

Looking for a pretty glyph now … will post the new sample shortly.

nina's picture

Here's a new one for your collective amusement (:

eliason's picture

Sorry Craig, you’re too late …

Shoot, gotta be quick around here!

nina's picture

Hmm, a little hint maybe?
The one I posted is not a letter S from an inline font.

nina's picture

Actually, I'm sure you all know this multi-weight, multi-language, sans serif typeface, although this is from its Alternate version (which is the only one I have – but judging by the PDF, it looks like this symbol doesn't differ from the regular version).

eliason's picture

Is it a section mark?

nina's picture

You're §pot on, Craig. :)

nina's picture

Hmm, this is what the S would look like (same font, same scale).
If anyone is still watching this, that is…

plumbago's picture

Fedra Sans Bold by Peter Biľak?

But is the version at Typotheque… the version at FontShop and MyFonts has a different §
That was very tricky!

nina's picture

Congrats Marcelo! That's 100% correct. (Actually I used Fedra Sans Alt Bold, as I don't have the non-Alt, but I'm pretty sure these particular glyphs are the same.)

And, I'm very sorry about the version problem. It didn't occur to me that there might be different "§" versions floating around… mea culpa.  :-|
Anyway, yes, this is the Typotheque version.

You go!  :-)

plumbago's picture

Great! thanks, Nina.

Here we go:

Have fun!

plumbago's picture

hmmm… it seems there's no one interested in the quizes anymore?
Anyway, here a little hint: The designer is a fellow latin american.

plumbago's picture

You might already have guessed it… This is not a ‘t’

plumbago's picture

yes, Craig, it's a † dagger from a very sweet font.

eliason's picture

That would be Ale Paul's Candy Script from Sudtipos!

plumbago's picture

Yes it is! congratulations.
Your turn now.

eliason's picture

Hint: This font is as old as Clint Eastwood.

eliason's picture

Or maybe even better: old as Der blaue Engel.

barthak's picture

It is Kino, designed by Martin Dovey in 1930.

eliason's picture

You got it, barthak!

barthak's picture

Great!

Here's a new one:

barthak's picture

This idiosyncratic italic is of French proportions, but its shapes take their cues from the Dutch style.

barthak's picture

Absolutely! Well done :)

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Thanks! Now I have to come up with a quest…

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Tip: it’s not available anymore, the designer withdraw the typeface

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

hint: It was for sale at Garagefonts

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Ok.
More glyphs:

Good luck! :)

Pieter

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

A glyph from a (different) typeface designed by the same designer:

Jan's picture

So the designer is Joshua Darden.

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Yes, you are right! One of the first designs he made was part of the collection of GarageFonts, but not any more. What was the name of that typeface?
He didn’t design it alone though…

Pieter

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Hint 1: Joshua Darden designed the typeface in collaboration with Timothy Glaser.
Hint 2: Also a serif version was designed with the name (name typeface) Bookserif.

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

You got it! It’s you turn now.

eliason's picture

Okay, here goes:

eliason's picture

Yes you do, but somebody else must, too!

barthak's picture

I do -- it's the inverted exclamation mark from Cochin! :^)

eliason's picture

You got it - that was quick! You're up, barthak.

barthak's picture

Just good timing, been a while since I visited the forum. Nice challenge, btw.

Here's a new one:

barthak's picture

It's not some obscure bitmap font, it's actually from a respectable Font Foundry.

Renko's picture

Oops, wrong thread. Sorry.

eliason's picture

Is that a fleuron?

barthak's picture

Not a fleuron, just a kapital letter.

Btw it's been so long that I've forgotten the name of this ffont myself! :P

Bendy's picture

>just a kapital letter.

From the roman alphabet?

Florian Hardwig's picture

It is one of the three uppercase K alternates in Martin L’Allier’s modular blackletter typeface FF Karo Line.

barthak's picture

Absolutely! Great, the quiz finally continues :)

Florian Hardwig's picture

Woohoo! Okay, the next one will be a tad easier:


Have fun!

miha's picture

Iowan Old Style Roman? If it is, this was too easy indeed.

Florian Hardwig's picture

And you didn’t cheat and used WTF? Well, I don’t think it was that easy then. John Downer’s Iowan Old Style is not very common, is it?
Well deserved, Miha! Your turn.

typerror's picture

Very popular here. I see it all the time, especially in ads.

Michael

miha's picture

Well … I cheated (this is the reason why it was easy :D). I think you should post another one!

Florian Hardwig's picture

@Michael: Okay, I didn’t know. That’s great.
@Miha: No, come on! It’s your turn, if only because of your forthrightness.

miha's picture

OK!

If it’s too hard, I’ll start exposing hints latter.

miha's picture

This typeface is actually a part of basic superfamily; there is both serif and sans design.

Bendy's picture

I thought it might be Feijoa but it isn't. I do recognise it though. What could it be?

miha's picture

It was made by a very well known company, umh, corporation. It has a specific and in a way limiting purpose, which makes it less known among traditional typographers.

miha's picture

The typeface(s) was made primary for screen use. The “corporation” was a reference to the foundry’s name.

And yes, there are certain similarities to Feijoa.

miha's picture

Yes, this is Droid Serif! It’s your turn.

I also wrote a some info:

Droid fonts have serif and sans-serif as well as monospaced design. They were made specifically for screen use.

From the website: “The Droid family of fonts was designed by Ascender’s Steve Matteson beginning in the fall of 2006. The goal was to provide optimal quality and reading comfort on a mobile handset. The Droid fonts were optimized for use in application menus, web browsers and for other screen text.

Link to specimen [PDF].
Online live specimen by kernest.com.

Typefaces were made for Android, an operating system for mobile devices. Android was developed by Google and was released under open source license – consequently, fonts were also licensed under the same open source license. They are free, but I think there is a more important implication that fonts can be used in web design in their native form (“raw”) in non-IE browsers.

They also display good on Windows, unlike many professional typefaces (recent case 1, 2). (I mean that for text sizes. Headlines could be rendered much better.)

Despite their qualities they are not yet used on websites, but as software support continues and grows, they are going to be!

barthak's picture

Great! Well, here's a new one, another a:

barthak's picture

It's an award winning typeface.

plumbago's picture

Is it Fabiol Regular by Lazydogs Typefoundry?

barthak's picture

Yes it is! Well done, your turn.

plumbago's picture

Okay! Here's a new one.

plumbago's picture

It's a reproduction of the handwriting of an italian genius... I rather say no more!

Jan's picture

Well, that hint was saying too much.
The font is P22 Da Vinci Backwards.
Don’t know the name of the glyph, though.

plumbago's picture

hahaha! yes, it was a terrible hint. It is P22 Da Vinci Backwards and the glyph is a standard ligature (can you mention it now?).
Go ahead Jan, it's your turn.

Jan's picture

Oh ok. It’s the lf ligature (fl backwards!).
I’ll come up with something new soon.

Jan's picture

New challenge up.

John Lyttle's picture

I've been staring at this for weeks now. Jan, please post a hint. I keep going back to Zapata Black, willing that top serif to become incised, as on your image. It refuses to comply.

Jan's picture

Although the designer is american, at least the name of the font is half italian. Furthermore what the name refers to is something that when attemted to be produced in America is not very much respected in Europe. Wow, what a hint.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Wow, what a hint.

Yes, worked for me! :•) It’s the typeface with the eeriest curly brackets ever, right?

Jan's picture

curly brackets

You mean these: { } ?
Oh yeah!

Nick Cooke's picture

My Grandma used to drink Mackeson - it tasted disgusting.

Nick Cooke

nina's picture

Ohh now I know it too.
So why is nobody solving? Can I say what it is?

Jan's picture

Craig, Florian and Nick didn’t want to spoil John’s chance to solve it, I suppose.

nina's picture

Hmok, I'll play nice :o)

Jan's picture

I’ll clarify Florian’s hint (eery curly brackets).
Typesize reduced a bit.

John? Are you there?

eliason's picture

(I only didn't say because I'm running the expert quiz at the moment.)

Berg's picture

I finally found it, completely without merit, because of the hints.
It is Birra Stout, by Joshua Darden.

Jan's picture

That’s correct, Irène. Your turn.

John Lyttle's picture

You didn't need to show restraint for my sake, but thanks. I was unlikely to have solved the Birra Stout mystery. I am only now familiarizing myself with Darden Studio.

Berg's picture

Here is the next one.

Berg's picture

That was fast John!
Yes, it is Faceplate AGauge, by RXC (Rodrigo Xavier Cavazos).
It is your turn now.

John Lyttle's picture

Here I go, posting a glyph here for my first time. That's not a hint, by the way.

John Lyttle's picture

Este tipo de letra es hermosa.

plumbago's picture

Oh! sí, es hermosa, yo sé cual es, I know it but I’m running the expert quiz. Luis is the first name of the person on who this typeface is inspired, right?

John Lyttle's picture

You are right, Marcelo. Thanks for not saying the last name, since that is also the name of the typeface.

Florian Hardwig's picture

My money is on Lagarto Italic by Gabriel Martínez Meave. The glyph should be the ‘fi’ ligature.
F

John Lyttle's picture

You are right, Florian! Looking forward to your challenge . . .

Florian Hardwig's picture

Thanks, John!

Here’s the new glyph. Hope it’s not too heavy. Have fun!

John Lyttle's picture

I was born in 1966. If this is the typeface I think it is, we're the same age.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi John,
I think you think of the wrong typeface, sorry.
This one is younger: It was published in the year when the designers of these two faces* were born:

*) They have absolutely nothing to do with the typeface in question. I just thought it’s too early for a plaintext hint.

Jan's picture

Something by Tom Carnase from the 70s?

riccard0's picture

Not Manhattan... Not Fat Face...

riccard0's picture

Carousel is so close...

nina's picture

Hey, might this be the [pound sign from Tom Carnase's] elusive ITC Didi?
The font is sometimes referred to as pre-digital, but there seems to have been an Image Club version which however isn't available anymore.

Florian Hardwig's picture

I assume John (JL) was thinking of Gary Gillot’s Carousel, too. But that’s not it.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Tom Carnase: ✓
Pound sign: ✓
Elusive: ✓
ITC: ✓
Didi: Nope, sorry.

Do you want to see another glyph?

Jan's picture

I checked everything by Carnase I could think of and didn’t find it. Hm.

nina's picture

:-\

I don't know if another glyph would help, since I already can't find this one for the life of me, but yes please :-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

I’m sorry for having ruined your Sunday noon … :D

Like ITC Didi, this font is not available at the moment. Still, there is a digital version of it. And it has popped up on the Type ID Board several times. I find its lowercase quite wobbly. Here’s my favourite glyph:

nina's picture

Slightly more verbose reply:
Firenze, designed by Tom Carnase for ITC in 1970.
Link to entire alphabet

Florian Hardwig's picture


100% correct! It’s Firenze. To answer the cryptic first hint: 1970 is the year that Ross Mills (designer of Plantagenet) and Alejandro Lo Celso (Rayuela) were born.
Your turn!

Jan's picture

Damn. Why didn’t I just say Firenze? Couldn’t find a complete specimen so I didn’t dare. Stupid me.

nina's picture

Thank you, Florian – how lovely :-)

Here's the new glyph:

barthak's picture

Pivo by František Štorm! :^)

nina's picture

Oh man, now I didn't even get to use my "more beer!!!" hint.

Your turn! :-)

barthak's picture

Sorry ‘bout that, I was so surprised I found it that I couldn't wait ;-)

New one comming up soon.

barthak's picture

Here you go. Good luck!

barthak's picture

Chances are this font is already installed on your computer.

Nick Cooke's picture

Three wheels on my wagon and I'm still rollin' along...

Nick Cooke

barthak's picture

Haha, that's great! Not being American I never heard that song before.

BTW pretty Hi-larious looking glyph isn't it?

Nick Cooke's picture

I'm not either, but I have. Yup, pretty strange but I like it.

Nick Cooke

barthak's picture

This font -- which comes with OSX and Windows Vista -- is part of a much larger typeface with an extensive language support for basic Latin -- which this one also has -- as well as Greek, most European laguages and many ( other ) North American Native languages.


The Latin is based on Baskerville and Fournier, which I'm not going to post because of WhatTheFont ;-)

eliason's picture

Oh, its the 'hi' from Tiro Typeworks' Plantagenet Cherokee.

barthak's picture

"Three wheels on my wagon, And I’m still rolling along, The Cherokees are chasing me, Arrows fly, right on by, But I’m singing a happy song."

Hi, yes it's Plantagenet Cherokee!

That wasn't so hard, was it? ;-)

eliason's picture

And I should have gotten it sooner because someone just posted that alphabet to my current critique thread.

I think this one might be easy:

eliason's picture

Yup, it's Snicker by St. Paul, Minnesota's (and Typophile's) own Mark Simonson. It was inspired by lettering he spotted in an old Superman cartoon series.

Your turn plumbago!

plumbago's picture

Here we go!

Have fun!

John Lyttle's picture

Looks a bit like the g in this sketch by a certain Londoner type designer.

Jan's picture

London type designer. Jonathan Hughes?

John Lyttle's picture

Popgod by Rian Hughes, I believe. He was featured in this newsletter, which is where I found his sketch – not for this type but for a logo that he had been working on.

Jan's picture

Oh yeah. Rian Hughes is who I was thinking of. And I think you nailed it!

John Lyttle's picture

Do you think I should I wait for Marcelo to confirm? I've got a new glyph ready to roll.

plumbago's picture

You guys have been busy!

Well done John! it's Popgod by Rian Hughes. Go ahead.

John Lyttle's picture

OK, then. I'm just using a "2" because it's my second time up to bat here. It's not a hint.

John Lyttle's picture

Here's some biographical info on the type designer: "Se graduó en Diseño Gráfico en la Temple University Tyler School of Art en Filadelfia en 1994."

It was easier to find this info in Spanish than in English. Anyway, that's my two bits' worth of hinting for now.

eliason's picture

It's Holiday Script from House Industries.

John Lyttle's picture

You got it, Craig. The type designer of Holiday Script is Ken Barber.
Shave and a haircut: two bits. Haircut. Barber. That was my groaner of a clue.
Your turn . . .

eliason's picture

Here's one for you:

John Lyttle's picture

I posted the last challenge, so I'm not supposed to win this one.
But as I look at that f and think of its designer, I can't help hum a little song from the ’80s . . .

nina's picture

Oh, that was too good a hint!

It's ITC Mixage, designed by Aldo Novarese in 1985. Medium weight.

I won't pretend I'm not copy-pasting this from the Linotype site: "Mixage font is the work of Italian designer Aldo Novarese, who cleverly combined the character shapes and proportions like those of Syntax and Antique Olive with the grace and warmth of a calligraphic typeface. Mixage font is a good alternative to more traditional sans serif designs."

eliason's picture

Bingo! You're up, Nina.

nina's picture

Whee!
Here you are, guys:

nina's picture

O, I guess it wasn't too easy then…
This is a basic Latin character, FWIW. But an alternate glyph in this font.

John Lyttle's picture

My tendency appears to be making things too easy. You don't suffer from that habit, do you, Nina? Can you give us a little hint about this curious glyph?

nina's picture

Oops, sorry, I forgot I was still wearing this hat!
Hint… hm…
The standard glyph for this character in this font has no crossbar. Think about it.

nina's picture

Almost: "X". :-)
(All the UC characters in this font have stylistic alternates; the lc doesn't.)

Jan's picture

Ha! Found it. It’s the alternate ‘X’ in Kaas by Hugo d’Alte.

nina's picture

You nailed it Jan! Kickass font BTW. :-)

Your turn!

eliason's picture

Kaas?! That would be another confusing one for Cheese or Font.

Jan's picture

Kickass font. Yeah, I love it. New challenge up soon.

Jan's picture

The designer describes the origin of his typefaces as “combining traditional drawing values with the computer’s mastery of geometric form.”

Jan's picture

Correct Riccardo. Your turn.

riccard0's picture

I have to admit I'm a better googler than I am at identifying typefaces...
Ah, the shame!
I'll post something up as soon as possible.

riccard0's picture

Well, yes, it is a "script small l"...

eliason's picture

I thought it was Moped Sans, but no.

riccard0's picture

Nothing that fancy, alas...

riccard0's picture

Ok, then.
It is a ℓ.
It was designed in 1990, but based on a much older specimen.
It's name is somewhat related to London.

riccard0's picture

Oh, well, there's always someone that kill a thread off. It seems that today it's my turn… ;-)

riccard0's picture

Here's a little bump:


It's a wood type from 1830.

John Lyttle's picture

Is it Poplar—glyph 157? The ℓ would have been glyph 250.

riccard0's picture

Aaaaand we have a winner! :-)

Poplar was designed by Barbara Lind in 1990 for the Adobe Wood Type series from photographs taken by Rob Roy Kelly of the one surviving copy of an 1830 William Leavenworth type specimen book. Leavenworth possessed unusual artistic abilities, and his treatment of the letterform counters as narrow slits made it the only wood type of its kind displayed during the nineteenth century.

Your turn, JL.

John Lyttle's picture

Thank you, Riccardo. Here we go.

John Lyttle's picture

I typically give away too much in the hints. I'll try to mend my ways by saying simply that this is not a 2.

riccard0's picture

It's a Q, I suppose.

John Lyttle's picture

Sorry! A typo. It's a lowercase q.

John Lyttle's picture

This is probably where I get carried away and hint too broadly.
If the glyph in question were a lowercase g, it would look like this:

John Lyttle's picture

The type designer in question has a background in sign making and tests his typefaces on a plotter to avoid problems at the vinyl cutting stage.

John Lyttle's picture

The studio is in Fort Worth, Texas.

eliason's picture

Ah, it's Harliquin (sic). (Which I only got by googling...)

John Lyttle's picture

Yes, Craig. It is Harliquin by Steve Contreras at Signfonts (Art & Sign Studio). I'm with you on the "sic" — I'd rather see this script named Harlequin. Anyway, your turn…

barthak's picture

Cap X, Englische Schreibschrift from Berthold?

eliason's picture

Exactly right, barthak!

barthak's picture

Here's a new one, if anyone is still watching this...

The roughness is because I do not own the face ( it's not the cheapest of fonts ) and the website doesn't provide a bigger sample.

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