Wanted: feedback on design and type choices

elaptics's picture

Hi All,

I'm new here, and new to typography in general. Though I've been interested in design for several years, I'm much more of a developer than designer but after watching a documentary about Gutenberg I've been bitten by the typography bug.

As I'm still very much in the early stages of learning about type I'd be interested in any recommendations for books or other resources I should investigate. I have just finished reading Robin Williams Non-designers design and type books which inspired me to create a design cheatsheet (using the techniques from the book) that I could have to hand to remind me of the main principles and ideas.

I have attached it to this post and I would really appreciate any feedback or criticism you may have on the overall design and the typefaces I chose along with any tips you have for improvement.

AttachmentSize
design principles cheatsheet.pdf151.16 KB
1985's picture

Hello, nice to meet you.

I'm no expert, but here is my offering!

Type is all about rules, but also about breaking them, on several levels. It seems that you have observed the rules in reading but I think that you need to concentrate very hard on how to design this information in order that it doesn't contradict itself! It's quite a complex task to illustrate so many ideas without the design becoming cluttered.

One rule that a lot of typographers/designers observe is to avoid using too many typefaces/colours, try and combine that rule with your design and you may find it helps clarity.

You could expand the cheat sheet into several small posters or pages of a booklet to focus on the main points, white space for example. Maybe then you could get away with more typefaces. One per poster perhaps, or one typeface on all posters and one that changes to illustrate some of your points!

The best way to learn though (at least for me) is not to focus too much on the rules, which become apparent as you design and discover what works and what doesn't.

Hope I don't sound preachy :-) Feel free to throw it all back at me!

Andy

1985's picture

Hello, nice to meet you.

I'm no expert, but here is my offering!

Type is all about rules, but also about breaking them, on several levels. It seems that you have observed the rules in reading but I think that you need to concentrate very hard on how to design this information in order that it doesn't contradict itself! It's quite a complex task to illustrate so many ideas without the design becoming cluttered.

One rule that a lot of typographers/designers observe is to avoid using too many typefaces/colours, Try to combine that rule with your design and you may find it helps give it some clarity.

You could expand the cheat sheet into several small posters or pages of a booklet to focus on the main points. Maybe then you could get away with more typefaces. One per poster perhaps, or one typeface that is constant and one that changes to illustrate some of your points!

The best way to learn though (at least for me) is not to focus too much on the rules, which become apparent as you design and discover what works and what doesn't.

Hope I don't sound preachy :-) Feel free to throw it all back at me!

Andy

elaptics's picture

Hi Andy,

Thanks for taking the time to look and replying. I kind of know that I'm using a few too many typefaces but I was really struggling to put all the points I wanted to cover together on one page in a more interesting way than having it all in a typical bullet list style. I also know that I've broken some of the rules. It was intentional but I'm not sure it comes across appropriately.

I like the top half of the page and feel that works quite well, but then I think it goes downhill somewhat after that and I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to approach making it better...

Andy (I'm also an Andy :))

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