I have posted new detailed images of the type from the famous book "Hypneroromachia" on flickr.

ebensorkin's picture

I have posted new detailed images of the type from the famous book "Hypneroromachia" on flickr.

Here is the link:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ebensorkin/sets/72157604825884265/

Here is a cropped sample

Comments

Katharina's picture

Thank you, Eben, I love these samples. - Is this the actual colour of the paper? And if it is, do you this the paper has darkened over the centuries?

And another question: Did I see right that the pages are not - in German it is called "registerhaltig" - the lines on the front and the back of the page do not correspond?

ebensorkin's picture

The paper color is far from exact. Sorry! I think the paper is of high quality so it may have darkened a bit but overall I would say they are holding up remarkably well.

I did not look for registerhaltig being present or not. But it's a good question. I will see if I can tell and if not I will look again the next time I am near one of these.

Hiroshige's picture

Awesome, thanks Eben. Interesting stuff about the different shapes of the same letters. When was the book produced?

ebensorkin's picture

1499

Hiroshige's picture

1499? Fantastic! That's old!

Sorry, but my knowledge of books doesn't extend much beyond my Architecture and Art library.

After some further reading about Hypnerotomachia, seems that monks had a clever way of getting their name out...

"While the authorship of this book remains a mystery, it is generally believed to be the work of Francesco Colonna, a Dominican monk who lived in Venice. Colonna's name is revealed in the book by taking the first letter of each of the 38 chapters to spell out 'Poliam frater Franciscus Columna peramavit', meaning 'Brother Francesco Colonna loved Polia tremendously'."

...now I'm wondering if monks had their own code?

ebensorkin's picture

Yes, speculating about the Hypnerotomachia has been great sport for a long time.

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